Michelle Obama's 'Evolution Of Mom Dancing' Is Back With Part 2

Apr 3, 2015
Originally published on April 3, 2015 5:56 pm

On The Tonight Show Thursday, Jimmy Fallon and first lady Michelle Obama dug out their cardigans to bring back their dance hit, "Evolution of Mom Dancing." Obama was on the show to promote the fifth anniversary of her "Let's Move" campaign against childhood obesity.

Here are some highlights from the interview:

1) Fallon's attempt at an Obama impression

"Didn't you get the memo? It's a barbecue" is what Obama apparently once said when Fallon showed up to a Fourth of July event wearing a three-piece suit. And naturally, as he retold the story, Fallon did the president's part in his best Obama voice.

The first lady stopped him: "That was your Barack Obama?"

"Was it good?" Fallon asked.

"No."

2) Childhood obesity

The first lady started her "Let's Move" campaign five years ago to lower the prevalence of childhood obesity.

"We've really started to shift the culture," she said, noting that fast-food chains now have healthier options, and school lunches are changing. "I'm just proud of the fact that people are sort of catching on to the cultural shift."

For the record, rates have stabilized since around 2003. Of course, there's no way to know whether "Let's Move" actually contributed to that.

3) Easter egg roll

The annual White House egg roll will bring 35,000 people to the South Lawn on Monday. The tradition, as Obama explained, is for children to push an egg from start to finish with a spoon. "Currently airing on ESPN 4," Fallon quipped. He had a better idea, though: Dye a dozen eggs, only cook eight and then "one at a time, you and the president smash them on your head. Whoever smashes two raw eggs loses."

4) Evolution of Mom Dancing, Part 2

If you missed Part 1, here it is:

This time Fallon, dressed in a pink cardigan and khakis, and Obama danced the "This Ol' Thing? I Got It At Talbots," the "Getting A Bag From Your Collection of Plastic Bags Under The Sink" and the "You Go, Girl."

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