New Hampshire's Electoral College Members Vote for Clinton; Decry Sexism in 2016 Race

Dec 19, 2016

The ritual formality of the state’s Electoral College vote was observed in the Executive Council chambers in Concord Monday: ballots were cast, documents were signed and sealed with wax.

The outcome was as ordained by the local results: New Hampshire's four votes, from four Democratic electors, went to Hillary Clinton. But the sting of the election – at least for Democrats -- remained visceral.

Demonstrators chanted outside the statehouse.

“Recount the vote, recount the vote, recount the vote."

And inside, the electors’ remarks were, at times, raw. One elector, Former House Speaker Teri Norelli, proclaimed Clinton the victim of sexism.

“If we listened we heard it during the campaign every day. Her voice was too loud, she was too ambitious, she was too emotional, she was not emotional enough. She laughed too loudly, she didn’t smile enough, she was a nasty woman.”

Protesters gathered outside the New Hampshire Statehouse during the Electoral College vote Monday
Credit Josh Rogers for NHPR

 She also exulted in her near record vote total.

“Hillary Clinton won the national popular vote, receiving more votes than any white man in our history.”

The other electors were less pointed, but said Clinton’s loss to Donald Trump must be overcome.

Former state senate president Bev Hollingworth warned that too much is at stake for voters to disengage.

“All of us should have common interest in seeking truth and repudiating disinformation. We should all have a common interest in promoting participation in our democracy.”

Elector Dudley Dudley, who in the 1970's was the first woman to serve on the Executive Council, hopes New Hampshire will consider joining other states an an agreement that award future electoral college votes to the presidential candidate who wins the popular vote nationally. Dudley envisions New Hampshire Secretary of state Bill Gardner offering counsel.

“I’ve asked the Secretary of State to look at it and give us some advice, and will see what that advice would be.”

Bill Gardner was quick to note lawmakers would need to decide any such change, and as far as him weighing in, let’s say he’s in no hurry to go there.

“I have enough with the date, the Primary, and so, ah...”

Carol Shea-Porter, the state’s final elector, said she’ll be focusing on guidance she learned as a child, the serenity prayer.

"It helps me to remember that are things you need to accept with grace, and there are things you cannot, that you need courage to fight that and you need wisdom to know the difference," words she says Democrats everywhere would be wise to consider.