Inside NHPR
11:30 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Top Stories: Vanishing Rest Stops; Making Local Food More Profitable

Credit Ryann Ford

1. Vanishing Rest Stops

For the past fifty-three years, rest areas have offered weary travelers a place to pull off and pause and maybe even learn a little local history. Traditional rest areas are disappearing across the country… Louisiana for example, has already closed twenty-four of its thirty-four stops. Ryann Ford is a photographer whose work has been featured in the New York Times and Texas Monthly. She’s been trying to capture these doomed rest areas with her camera… before they disappear.

Credit Emily Corwin / NHPR

2. Growing Pains: What One N.H. Farmer Is Doing To Make Local Food More Profitable

With almost 60 farmers markets across the state, demand for local food is growing.  But local farmers still struggle to make a profit growing local food. In fact, about three quarters of all farms in New Hampshire gross less than $10,000 from sales each year.

Credit Todd Bookman / NHPR

3. There’s Moonshine In These Here New Hampshire Woods

While "White Lightning" may have its roots in Appalachia, there's at least one illegal operation brewing in the deep shade of New Hampshire's forest. As part of Foodstuffs, NHPR's new series celebrating food, Todd Bookman reports.

4. Summer Reads 2013 Edition

There’s nothing more tempting than a day off spent soaking up the sun on a hot beach with a good read. Summer reads don’t have to be mindless, though. Michele Filgate likes to find the perfect book for every occasion, and isn’t afraid to add some substance to the usually light fare offered by summer reading suggestions.

5. The Hardest Thing To Find In The Universe?

What is rarer than a shooting star? Rarer than a diamond? Rarer than any metal, any mineral, so rare that if you scan the entire earth, all six million billion billion kilos or 13,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 pounds of our planet, you would find only one ounce of it?

6. Nuclear Power: Fading Away Or Powering Up?

After the disaster in the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan, many nations shelved their plans for increasing nuclear power generation. But with growing concerns about global warming, some nations are now giving nuclear a second look.

7. The Sometimes Positive Effects Of Trauma

The number of shocking events over the past year is overwhelming. Although the specifics of each catastrophe varies, media coverage adheres to a similar script involving communal resilience, collective support, and predictions of post-traumatic stress among victims and witnesses – even those thousands of miles away. In recent years, a small branch of positive psychology has been exploring the possibility that adversity can be a source of strength and wisdom.

8. New Program Will Support Unemployed People Starting Own Business

People collecting unemployment benefits in New Hampshire will soon have another option for finding work – creating their own job.

9. The People’s Forest

“The People’s Forest” a new film about the White Mountain National Forest by filmmaker David Huntley premieres on Tuesday. The 48 minute documentary examines a dramatic period in the life of New Hampshire’s great woods from 1860 to 1910 and shows how the human forces that conspired to nearly destroy the land came together again to save it.

Credit Courtesy of Alex Dowst

10. Farm Goes All In On Heirlooms

At farmer's markets, co-ops, and small local farms, heirloom tomatoes are becoming more common. They're older tomato breeds – some very old – that haven't been hybridized or genetically modified, and with seeds that can actually be planted to grow new tomatoes. A pair of young New Hampshire farmers wants to raise awareness that heirloom doesn't just mean tomatoes, and they've started what they say is the state's only all-heritage farm, River Round Heirloom, to prove it.