This Week in N.H. News: Luxury Loft Lead Issues, Drought Dilemmas & More

Aug 5, 2016

After a few weeks' hiatus, we're back! Even when this weekly rundown isn't here to catch you up on what happened around New Hampshire, you can always stay in the loop with our weekly newsletters — sign up here to get them delivered right to your inbox.

Special Series: Homelessness in N.H.

Credit Illustration by Emma Jacobs

In New Hampshire, being homeless "can mean a three-hour walk to the grocery store, or dying on the way back from the soup kitchen."

This January a disabled homeless man was hit and killed by a car in Concord. His death opened a conversation about what homelessness looks like in our state. It turns out, there's no one answer to that question.

This week, NHPR's Jack Rodolico and Natasha Haverty took a look at the lives of New Hampshire's homeless residents and the driving forces that sometimes keep them hidden in plain view, and others that criminalize their plight.

Explore the full series here.

Brady Sullivan's Lead Problems Persist

The Environmental Protection Agency is accusing one of New Hampshire’s most prominent real estate developers of breaking two federal lead paint laws. It’s the latest in a string of public health complaints against Brady Sullivan Properties, as Jack Rodolico reports.

Jack's been following the Brady Sullivan story for a while now, and you can see his earlier reporting right here.

Playing God, or Fair Game?

When a Harvard professor accidentally let Gypsy Moths loose in the 1860s, he didn’t realize he was releasing a scourge that would plague New England forests for more than a century. Nothing could stop the moths except a controversial method of wildlife management called biocontrol.

This week, the Outside/In podcast digs in to the scientific version of “fighting fire with fire” - eradicating invasive species by introducing another invasive species. There have been lots of biocontrol success stories, but also a few disastrous failures. So, is it an effective weapon? Or is it scientific hubris?

Listen to the episode, or subscribe to Outside/In on iTunes and never miss a download.

Mourning a New Hampshire Summer Icon

 

Elizabeth Moreau, a Hampton Beach icon, died of a stroke on Monday night after nearly forty years on the boardwalk. In the days since, there has been an outpouring of response on social media.

People have flooded the Hampton Beach Facebook page with pictures and memories of Elizabeth and the gallery.

A few weeks before she died, Moreau and her husband spoke with NHPR about their gallery, and why she loved coming to work every day. Get the story here.

In Other News

Granite Staters Go for the Gold

Tonight, the 2016 Summer Olympics will officially kick off in Rio de Janeiro — with a small cohort of Granite Staters among those competing in this year’s games. USA TODAY identified three athletes hailing from New Hampshire.

By WMUR’s count, at least seven more U.S. Olympians will be representing Dartmouth at this year’s games, and at least three more athletes with New Hampshire ties will be competing for other nations.

Have You Ever Seen the Rain? (Not Lately, in N.H. …)

We’re facing one of the worst droughts in recent decades: More than 100 local water systems have imposed formal restrictions or bans on outdoor watering, while everyone else is also being told to conserve as much water as they can. (For more on current conditions, check out the U.S. Drought Monitor.)

Wondering what to make of all of this? Let experts from the N.H. Department of Environmental Services, the University of New Hampshire and elsewhere explain what’s up with the dry weather and what it might mean for you, courtesy of The Exchange.

‘Pledge’ Politics Divide GOP Governor Hopefuls

Since 2010, top Republicans running for governor in New Hampshire have been quick to sign on with Americans for Prosperity-New Hampshire’s anti-tax “pledge.” This year, things are a little different — and it all comes back to the state’s Medicaid expansion. (And, as the Union Leader notes, the gubernatorial race isn’t the only place where AFP’s become a source of division within New Hampshire’s Republican ranks.)

That said, AFP remains a growing political force in the Granite State, and you can read all about its influence in our recent reporting right here.

~ Flashback Friday ~

This week marked 35 years since NHPR (formerly known as “WEVO”) first hit the airwaves. Wondering what that first broadcast sounded like? Check it out here.

And for a stroll down memory lane, check out some of our favorite throwback photos from the past three-and-a-half decades. (You might recognize a few familiar faces among those being interviewed in our studios over the years.)

Also Worth A Click

  • An age-old Granite State debate: Where, exactly, is the North Country anyway? (Union Leader)
  • ‘Lord Stanley’ Swings Through the Upper Valley: Dartmouth Alum and Stanley Cup Winner Ben Lovejoy brought the trophy back to his old stomping grounds this week. The cup itself served as a cereal bowl, took a campus tour and was accompanied by two bodyguards along the way. (Valley News, The Dartmouth)
  • New Money: Some lucky customer at the Raymond Hannaford is about to be $487 million richer after last week’s Powerball drawing — but just who that person is remains a mystery. (Union Leader)
  • Leafy Bounty: You might consider turning your next hike into a harvest, thanks to some tips from one dude from Henniker who’s started a business selling foraged herbal tinctures. (NHPR)
  • Minority Report Healthcare: New “cognitive” technology being piloted at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center sounds like something out of a science fiction movie — the hospital’s trying to use artificial intelligence to monitor some patients’ conditions for warning signs that a human might not immediately pick up on.  (Technology Review)
  • Vroom-Vroom! Did you know that New Hampshire is home to an “indie motorcycle magazine?” Now you do. (NHPR)
  • Oh, Boy: “Florida Man” strikes again. This time, he’s accused of breaking into the Statehouse. (Union Leader)
  • Neither Rain, Nor Granite: One New Hampshire post office celebrated its 200th birthday this week — and it also happens to be the oldest continually operating one in the country. (Keene Sentinel)