All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4 pm
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel and
Brady Carlson

Every weekday, local host, Brady Carlson, and national hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features from NHPR and NPR.

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Law
5:33 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Clinton's Use Of Personal Email Could Hamper Archiving Efforts

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 2:01 pm

NPR's Melissa Block talks to Jason R. Baron, former director of litigation at the National Archives, about federal laws governing email. Until four months ago, officials could use personal email as long as they forwarded it to agency records.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Science
4:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Archaeologists Use Moles To Solve Mysteries Of Middle Ages' Fort

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Moles get a bad rap. They dig tunnels destroying gardens and lawns.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

They're not particularly cute or cuddly - I mean, come on, there are games where the goal is to hit plastic moles on the head.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

A Snowshoe Trek From An Adirondack Mountain Summit

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR Story
4:30 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Monarch Butterfly Population Rejuvenated After Last Year's Record Low

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:29 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
6:25 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

House Passes No-Strings-Attached Bill To Fund Homeland Security

An effort by some congressional Republicans to block President Obama's executive actions on immigration by tying it to a Homeland Security spending bill officially failed on Tuesday. House Speaker John Boehner yet again bucked the most conservative wing of his party and brought a "clean" funding bill to the floor. It passed easily, thanks to unanimous backing by Democrats.

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Law
5:23 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Ferguson Political Leader: DOJ Report Validates Protesters

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:25 pm

The Justice Department is set to release a report that condemns the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department for its discriminatory practices. NPR's Melissa Block speaks with local political leader Patricia Bynes about the report and its implications.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remembrances
5:23 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

'Minnie Monoso,' First Black Latin Professional Baseball Player, Dies

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:25 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
4:34 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

In France, Young Muslims Often Straddle Two Worlds

Ismael Medjdoub grew up in one of Paris' banlieues. He spends up to two hours a day commuting from his home in Tremblay en France to work and to school at the prestigious Sorbonne in Paris.
Bilal Qureshi NPR

Originally published on Thu March 5, 2015 10:40 am

The French, with their national motto of "liberty, equality, fraternity," are so against religious and ethnic divisions that the government doesn't even collect this kind of data on its citizens, but it's believed that nearly 40 percent of the country's 7 million Muslims live in and around Paris.

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U.S.
4:24 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Not Clearing The Snow Off Your Car Before Driving Could Cost You

A driver clears his car windshield in Boston on Jan. 27, after a heavy storm hit the city. Pennsylvania could be the next state to pass legislation that would cite drivers that take to the road before removing the hazardous ice and snow.
Robert Nickelsberg Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:25 pm

After weeks of winter storms, snow fatigue has set in across much of the country.

You may be tired of clearing ice and snow off your car, but that can be a safety hazard. And now you could face a fine in some states.

Mike Taylor of Elkins Park, Pa., says just this week he was behind a car on the Pennsylvania Turnpike when, "Snow on the roof blew off, hit my windshield, forced me to jiggle, and it was only because of the stability of the car and I slowed down that I didn't have an accident," Taylor says.

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Law
4:18 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Attica Prison Guards Plead Guilty To Misconduct After Beating Inmate

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:25 pm

In 2011, the three guards in New York state beat inmate George Williams so badly that he suffered two broken legs, broken ribs, a broken shoulder and a severe fracture of his eye socket, among other injuries. NPR's Melissa Block talks to Tom Robbins of The Marshall Project about his reporting in collaboration with the New York Times.

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All Things Considered
2:00 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Granite Geek: A Simple Way To Stop Winter Car Rust

This might not be the best example of winter car care. Regular washings can keep your car from rusting like this one.
Credit Don O'Brien via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/JJrqM

For people, winter has pros and cons - but for cars, this kind of weather is not ideal.

David Brooks writes the weekly Granite Geek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and GraniteGeek.org. He spoke with All Things Considered about the effects of road salt on cars in winter - and the simple and not-so-simple ways we might stop those effects before they start.

 

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Code Switch
6:38 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Before Rosa Parks, A Teenager Defied Segregation On An Alabama Bus

"I knew why they chose Rosa" Parks instead of her as a symbol of the civil rights movement, Colvin says. "They thought I would be too militant for them."
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 9:43 am

Rosa Parks is well-known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a public bus in Montgomery, Ala., in December 1955. But Parks' civil rights protest did have a precedent: Fifteen-year-old Claudette Colvin, a student from a black high school in Montgomery, had refused to move from her bus seat nine months earlier. However, Colvin is not nearly as well-known, and certainly not as celebrated, as Parks.

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Parallels
4:58 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Britain's Muslims Still Feel The Need To Explain Themselves

Members of the Muslim community leave the East London Mosque after prayers before the start of the holy month of Ramadan in June 2014. The mosque has an estimated 7,000 worshippers.
Rob Stothard Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 5:48 pm

Jihadi John, runaway schoolgirls, no-go zones: the headlines are everywhere in Great Britain.

If you are Muslim in Britain, you can't get away from them. If you're Salman Farsi, you're often at the center of it.

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All Tech Considered
4:58 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Free Wi-Fi On Buses Offers A Link To Future Of 'Smart Cities'

More than 600 Porto city buses and taxis have been fitted with routers to provide free Wi-Fi service. It's being touted as the biggest Wi-Fi-in-motion network in the world.
Sérgio Rodrigues Veniam

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 1:43 pm

Board any city bus in Portugal's second-largest municipality, Porto, and you've got free Wi-Fi. More than 600 city buses and taxis have been fitted with wireless routers, creating what's touted as the biggest Wi-Fi-in-motion network in the world.

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Law
4:58 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Supreme Court Seems Divided Over Independent Redistricting Commissions

Arizona commission attorney Mary O'Grady (left) and Stephen Miller, a city council member, point to a possible redistricted map in 2011.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 12:49 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court seemed closely divided Monday as it heard arguments testing how far states may go to prevent political parties from drawing congressional district lines to maximize partisan advantage.

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On Aging
4:17 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

GAO Report Urges Fewer Antipsychotic Drugs For Dementia Patients

About 1 in 3 patients with dementia who live in nursing homes are being sedated with antipsychotic drugs, the GAO says. Outside nursing homes, about 1 in 7 dementia patients are getting the risky drugs.
Wladimir Bulgar iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 1:16 am

Older adults with Alzheimer's Disease or other forms of dementia are at risk of being prescribed dangerous antipsychotic medication whether they live in nursing homes or not. That's according to a study from the Government Accountability Office published Monday.

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History
4:17 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Ben Franklin's Famous 'Liberty, Safety' Quote Lost Its Context In 21st Century

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 11:40 am

Benjamin Franklin once said: "Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." That quote often comes up in the context of new technology and concerns about government surveillance. Benjamin Wittes, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and the editor of Lawfare, tells NPR's Robert Siegel that it wasn't originally meant to mean what people think.

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Politics
4:17 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Sen. Mikulski, Groundbreaker For Female Legislators, Won't Seek Re-Election

Mikulski (left) and her then-opponent Linda Chavez hold hands before the Maryland Senate candidates debate in 1986.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 4:00 pm

A surprise political announcement Monday — the longest-serving woman in Congress, Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, said she will not seek re-election next year. Mikulski was first elected to the House in 1976, and 10 years later was elected to the Senate.

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Movie Interviews
6:07 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

A Most Vibrant Year For Cinematographer Bradford Young

In Selma, director of photography Bradford Young wanted the camera to feel like a participant. "It was just about never retreating, always staying dangerously close to Martin Luther King," he says.
Atsushi Nishijima Paramount Pictures

Just two months into 2015, cinematographer Bradford Young is already having a big year.

Two acclaimed movies, Selma and A Most Violent Year, bear his name as Director of Photography.

"It's an interesting time," he laughs.

He sat down for a chat with NPR's Arun Rath, who started by asking about the striking depictions of violence in Selma.

"You have to be very delicate," Young says, "because as much as film has the ability to raise humanity, it also has the ability to put us down."

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Code Switch
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

How Pittsburgh's Freedom House Pioneered Paramedic Treatment

Freedom House paramedics, who first were deployed in the 1960s, provided a crucial service for Pittsburgh residents. The program became a national model for emergency medical transport and care.
Courtesy of University of Pittsburgh

In the 1960s, Pittsburgh, like most cities, was segregated by race. But people of all colors suffered from lack of ambulance care. Police were the ones who responded to medical emergency calls.

"Back in those days, you had to hope and pray you had nothing serious," recalls filmmaker and Hollywood paramedic Gene Starzenski, who grew up in Pittsburgh. "Because basically, the only thing they did was pick you up and threw you in the back like a sack of potatoes, and they took off for the hospital. They didn't even sit in the back with you."

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World
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

London's Homeless Line Up For Free Meals From Mobile Sikh Kitchen

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

How Is Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu's Washington Visit Playing In Israel?

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Animals
6:13 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

To Curb Bear Population, Florida Reinstates Hunting Season

This black bear was spotted atop a tree in Tampa, Fla., on May 17, 2013. The bear population has been on the rise, so state wildlife officials are calling for a bear hunting season.
Skip O'Rourke MCT /Landov

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

For the first time in two decades, Florida officials have scheduled a bear hunting season. It's a response to a rise in bear attacks — but it has some environmentalists upset.

Experts say there's plenty of room for humans and black bears to co-exist, but the smell of food is pulling the animals out of the woods and into neighborhoods.

If you want to understand the situation, take a trip to Franklin County, in the pandhandle. A few months ago, a bear attacked a teenager there while she walked her dog near a convenience store.

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Code Switch
5:45 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

Diversity Sells — But Hollywood Remains Overwhelmingly White, Male

Gina Rodriguez stars alongside Justin Baldoni in The CW's Jane the Virgin.
Danny Feld The CW

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

If you want an accurate picture of ethnic and gender diversity in the United States, don't look to Hollywood.

That's the conclusion of the "2015 Hollywood Diversity Report" conducted by the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA.

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Politics
4:59 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

Is The Battle Won And Done For Those Who Fought For Net Neutrality?

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: All in favor, say aye.

UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Together) Aye.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Opposed?

UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Together) No.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: The ayes have it.

(APPLAUSE)

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Space
4:59 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

Rejected As A Mars One Astronaut Candidate, She's Turning To Plan B (Or M)

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Last year, we introduced you to Heidi Beemer, a young woman determined to one day leave this planet and go to Mars.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

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Law
4:59 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

The Challenges Of Jury Selection In The Boston Marathon Bombing Trial

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Around the Nation
6:28 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

New Museum Depicts 'The Life Of A Slave From Cradle To The Tomb'

In recent years, some popular antebellum plantations have started to incorporate displays about slavery. But the Whitney Plantation has designed the visitor's entire experience around that history.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:31 pm

The section of Louisiana's serpentine River Road that tracks along the Mississippi between New Orleans and Baton Rouge is known as "Plantation Alley." The restored antebellum mansions along the route draw hundreds of thousands of visitors a year.

The newest attraction aims to give visitors a realistic look at life in the pre-Civil War South. Don't expect hoop skirts and mint juleps, but stark relics that tell the story of a dark period in American history, through the eyes of the enslaved.

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Europe
6:28 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Putin Critic Boris Nemtsov Shot Dead In Moscow

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Television
5:51 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

'Battle Creek' An Attempt To Break CBS's Formulaic Lineup

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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