The Diane Rehm Show

Weekdays at 10 am
Diane Rehm

For complete details, visit the Diane Rehm show website.

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About the Diane Rehm show

For more than 30 years, The Diane Rehm Show has offered listeners thoughtful and lively conversations on an array of topics with many of the most distinguished people of our times. Each week, more than 2 million listeners* across the country and around the world tune in for a lively mix of current events and public affairs programming that ranges from hard news analysis of politics and international affairs to in-depth examinations of religious issues, health and medical news, education and parenting. The first hour is news-oriented while the second is typically devoted to one-on-one interviews with authors of newly-released fiction and nonfiction.
Diane's guests include many of the nation's top newsmakers, journalists and authors. Newsweek magazine calls the program one of the most interesting talk shows in the country, while The National Journal calls Diane "the class act of the talk radio world." Each hour includes dialogue with listeners who call, e-mail, or tweet to join Diane's virtual community and take part in a civil exchange of ideas. Diane's listeners and peers regularly praise her intelligent and probing, but unfailingly civil, manner.

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Podcasts

  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 12:28pm

    When journalists Katty Kay and Claire Shipman interviewed high-powered women, they noticed something unexpected. These women were leaders in their fields - CEOs and politicians - yet almost all expressed a lack of confidence in their abilities or worth. In a new book, Kay and Shipman try to figure out why. They meet with neuroscientists and psychologists to understand the new research on confidence. While it is partly influenced by genetics, self-assurance can be learned. Kay and Shipman argue that women can become more confident if they make an effort to take more risks and start to care less about pleasing people and perfection.

  • Thursday, April 17, 2014 11:28am

    Doctors and their patients often don’t have the information they need on the relative effectiveness of different treatments. Clinical trials provide invaluable data but can’t and don’t cover the myriad of individual circumstances in the real world of patients. As part of the Affordable Care Act, a number of hospitals, research centers, clinics, insurers and patient groups are working to create a massive database of medical records – stripped of personally identifiable data. The idea is to allow scientists to study the relative effectiveness of any number of different drugs, devices and treatment plans, but questions about privacy persist. Please join us to talk about big data and medicine.

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 12:28pm

    For a number of years American colleges and universities have increasingly relied on adjunct professors. As full professors retire, they're often replaced with part timers - who typically earn less, receive no benefits and have little say in academic affairs. Today part-time instructors account for about half of all faculty at the nation's public and private higher education institutions. Administrators defend the trend as a necessary cost-cutting measure amid rising expenses and reduced revenues. But many adjuncts have begun to fight for better pay and benefits. Guest host Susan Page and a panel of experts talk about the growing reliance on adjunct professors.

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 11:28am

    In a phone call this week, President Barack Obama warned Russian President Vladimir Putin against further aggression into Ukraine. As tension mounts between Russia and Ukraine, understanding the political motivations of Vladimir Putin.

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014 12:28pm

    Akhil Sharma, the author of the best-seller, "An Obedient Father," speaks with Diane about his latest novel, which tells the story of the Mishra family as it moves from Delhi to Queens in the late 1970s while making their way in a new country and coping with a wrenching tragedy. Sharma discusses on blurring the boundary between fiction and memoir.