The Diane Rehm Show

Weekdays at 10 am
Diane Rehm

For complete details, visit the Diane Rehm show website.

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About the Diane Rehm show

For more than 30 years, The Diane Rehm Show has offered listeners thoughtful and lively conversations on an array of topics with many of the most distinguished people of our times. Each week, more than 2 million listeners* across the country and around the world tune in for a lively mix of current events and public affairs programming that ranges from hard news analysis of politics and international affairs to in-depth examinations of religious issues, health and medical news, education and parenting. The first hour is news-oriented while the second is typically devoted to one-on-one interviews with authors of newly-released fiction and nonfiction.
Diane's guests include many of the nation's top newsmakers, journalists and authors. Newsweek magazine calls the program one of the most interesting talk shows in the country, while The National Journal calls Diane "the class act of the talk radio world." Each hour includes dialogue with listeners who call, e-mail, or tweet to join Diane's virtual community and take part in a civil exchange of ideas. Diane's listeners and peers regularly praise her intelligent and probing, but unfailingly civil, manner.

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Podcasts

  • Friday, July 25, 2014 12:28pm

    A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories: A blast kills at least sixteen at a UN school used as a civilian shelter in Gaza. The source of the bombing is unclear and Israelis and Palestinians blame each other. Secretary Kerry proposes a weeklong truce. Pro-Russian separatists hamper the international investigation on the downed Malaysian plane in eastern Ukraine. Pro-Russian rebels shoot down two Ukrainian military jets. President Obama meets with Central American presidents on the child migrant crisis. And the Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram is suspected in bombings in Nigeria that kill at least seventy-five people.

  • Friday, July 25, 2014 11:28am

    President Barack Obama meets with Central American leaders today on strategies to stem the flow of migrant children to the border. Prospects for immigration legislation grow dim, with congress down to one week before recess. Two federal appeals courts issue conflicting rulings on the affordable care act, setting the stage for further challenges. David Perdue wins the GOP’s senate runoff in Georgia, pitting him against democrat Michelle Nunn in November. The midterm contest could decide control of the senate. And a botched execution in Arizona takes two hours, one of the longest deaths by lethal injection in U.S. history.

  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 12:28pm

    Michelangelo created some of the most celebrated works in the history of Western art, including the "Pieta," "David" and the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Born in Italy during the Renaissance, Michelangelo was considered a genius in his own time. He was also known to be egotistical, hot-tempered and consumed by his work. He fought the notion that the artist was simply a craftsman and often clashed with patrons over creative control. Michelangelo insisted that he need answer only to his own muse. In doing so, a new book claims, he revolutionized the practice of art - and the role of the artist in society. A discussion about the life and legacy of Michelangelo.

  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 11:28am

    New York Sen. Charles Schumer recently declared: “Polarization and partisanship are a plague on American politics.” He says one of the main culprits is our party primary system. It is not a new criticism. Political scholars have long argued that when primary elections are restricted to voters from one party, nominees with the most extreme views often win. But some question whether open primaries – where voters can cross party lines -- actually improve the electoral fortunes of moderate candidates. And others worry open primaries dilute a party’s ability to nominate their own candidate without outside interference. Diane and her guests discuss the role of primaries in today’s polarized politics.

  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 12:28pm

    Ifemelu and Obinze are young college students in love when they leave military-ruled Nigeria. She heads to America on a scholarship, while he plunges into an undocumented life in London. For the first time in their lives they grapple with what it means to be black. They are the lead characters in the award-winning novel “Americanah” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. The book is many things: a romance, a story about immigration and a series of observations about race and what it means to be American. A readers’ review discussion of “Americanah.”