The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on iTunes, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 3/27 - Rebroadcast: How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain

Tuesday, 3/28 - N.H. Governor Chris Sununu

Wednesday, 3/29 - Discerning Dyslexia

Thursday, 3/30 - Understanding Transgender and Gender Identity

Friday, 3/31 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup
 

Transgender: Exploring Gender Identity

3 hours ago
Wikimedia Commons

Many people struggle with basic questions about gender and labels, including the concept of a transgender identity. While debate around recent legislation has brought the issue into the spotlight, social media and the internet have played a key role in shifting the culture's perspective on gender for several years.

On this edition of The Exchange, we'll look at the terms, the biology, and the emotional aspects of gender identity.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 31, 2017

4 hours ago

The New Hampshire House gets ready to vote on it's version of the state budget, but some conservatives say the Republican-crafted budget is too rich.  New Hampshire's two U.S. senators say they'll vote against Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's Supreme Court pick.  A new energy project coming from Canada and an adverse decision by regulators thickens the plot when it comes to the Northern Pass project.  

GUESTS:

WoodleyWonderWorks; Flickr

Once described as " word blindness," dyslexia affects a person's ability to read accurately and fluently. It's surprisingly common, but early screening and intervention can make a major difference.  

Now, a new state law requires school districts to do just that, but funding for a reading specialist in the N.H. Department of Education -- as required under the law to oversee the state's efforts on dyslexia -- was not included in either the Governor's or the House budget.

Allegra Boverman via Flickr/Creative Commons

During an interview on NHPR's The Exchange Tuesday, Governor Sununu insisted that a GOP-led effort to require voters to provide proof they are connected to the community where they vote is not meant to exclude anyone but simply to ensure the integrity of the state's voting process.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It's been about a month since N.H. Governor Chris Sununu delivered his budget address, which included $18 million for full-day kindergarten.  The House meanwhile appears to have somewhat different priorities  -- eliminating that funding in its version of the budget.

Scroll down to watch our Facebook Live video stream of Governor Sununu on The Exchange.

We'll get the Governor's take on this development, as well as his views on last week's collapse of the GOP health care bill. And we'll find out how far along he is on achieving his goal of talking with 100 companies in 100 days in hopes of convincing them to come to the Granite State.


How Emotions are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain

Mar 24, 2017
MacMillan

Our guest says most of us are pretty clueless about this - given all the misinformation on how our brains and bodies create our feelings.  In her new book, Lisa Feldman Barrett challenges long-held theories about emotions, debunked by modern neuroscience, but still shaping everything from health care to public safety.

This show was originally broadcast on February 27th, 2017. 

GUEST:

  • Lisa Feldman Barrett - A University Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University. She received an NIH Director's Pioneer Award for her groundbreaking research on emotion. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 24, 2017

Mar 24, 2017

Governor Chris Sununu made an unannounced trade mission to Montreal, re-affirming his support for Northern Pass and urging updates to NAFTA. House budget writers craft their version of the new state spending plan, eliminating 18 million dollars in kindergarten funding.  And flags are lowered to half-staff on the news of the death of State Senator Scott McGilvray. 

GUESTS:

New Thinking on Nuclear Weapons

Mar 22, 2017
The Smithsonian Institution

We examine nuclear security in a world where Cold War policies have left the country's nuclear weapons on a hair-trigger alert. President Donald Trump has proposed boosting federal spending on the production of nuclear weapons by more than $1 billion in 2018.  With escalating tensions recently due to nuclear weapons testing by North Korea, we discuss nuclear weapons policy, the current international situation, and how we can reduce the risk of nuclear war.


Becoming Savvy About Fake News

Mar 21, 2017
Pexels

The wave of fake news that flooded Facebook and other social media during last year's election campaign was a wake-up call for many.  But fake news  has actually been around for a long time. Seventy-five years ago, regional newspapers in the South falsely reported that first lady Eleanor Roosevelt  was quietly organizing  black women into secret "Eleanor Clubs," with the motto: "A white woman in the kitchen by 1943."    In the digital era, that kind of rumor can spread far and worldwide, in no time. 

Sky Guys: Hopes for Hospitable Exo-Planets

Mar 20, 2017
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Last month, NASA announced the discovery of a seven-planet system called TRAPPIST-1, just 39 light-years from our Sun.  The Sky Guys will  discuss why this system might give hope for other habitable planets beyond our solar system.  And SpaceX announces that two people have already put down a deposit for a trip to the moon and back in 2018.  Plus a look at NASA's research into the effects of space travel on humans, and how you can join the search for Planet 9.


Stefan Fussan via Flickr/Creative Commons

It's very early in the federal budget process, but President Trump's proposal  -- with its boost in military spending and severe cuts for several agencies, including the EPA, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. State Department  -- has made major waves,  including here in New Hampshire.   Now, Congress, which has the power of the purse, takes it from here, so whether President Trump's budget priorities hold sway,  is far from certain. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 17, 2017

Mar 17, 2017

Confusion reigns at town halls across the state as a nor'easter hits on Town Meeting Day.  The N.H. Senate examines bills reforming the state's Division of Children and Youth.  This follows a report that the head of DCYF closed hundreds of cases of suspected abuse over a two-day period last year.  And N.H.'s congressional delegation, along with Governor Chris Sununu, oppose the Republican healthcare plan.


Mike Mozart

Proposed Senate Bill 247 aims to prevent lead poisoning in children by strengthening lead testing requirements for children, and placing stricter requirements on properties containing lead paint. For some families, lead poisoning has caused long-term health problems that sometimes don't appear until years after exposure, and experts think the restrictions are not strong enough. However, landlords worry that the new requirements would be difficult to comply with, and come at a huge cost, and funding will be insufficient. For example, companies like Brady Sullivan are still managing fallout from lead poisoning several years ago that contributed to health problems in children living at their properties. We'll look at all sides of this issue.


Broadband Development in the Granite State

Mar 14, 2017
Tony Webster

Broadband, which connects homes, businesses, and schools to high speed internet, has been developing throughout the state, including in rural areas for several years. Which areas are still lacking access, and why? What is the importance of providing proper internet access to schools and places where businesses will develop? We'll delve into how broadband infrastructure works, and where it is working, in New Hampshire.


Michael Brindley for NHPR

A Senate bill that would alter the definition of “domicile” for voting purposes has caused an outcry among Democrats and others who claim it unnecessarily complicates the voting process and would suppress the vote among certain groups, including college students.

At a recent packed hearing, the vast majority were in opposition to the proposed changes.

Republican State Senator Regina Birdsell, lead sponsor of the bill, says her intention is not to exclude anyone. 

New Hampshire Public Radio

We're discussing proposed changes, under Senate Bill 3, to the state's legal definition of domicile:  An inhabitant's domicile for voting purposes is that one place where a person, more than any other place, has established a physical presence and manifests an intent to maintain a single continuous presence for domestic, social, and civil purposes relevant to participating in democratic self-government.  A person has the right to change domicile at any time, however a mere intention to change domicile in the future does not, of itself, terminate an established domicile before the person actually moves.  

Supporters of Senate Bill 3 say the above definition needs clarifying and tightening in order to avoid voting abuses. Opponents say proposed changes are, at best, unnecessary, and at worst, could dissuade certain people from going to the polls. 


NHPR

The winter tourism industry in New Hampshire provides thousands of jobs and garners millions of visits to resorts across the state. In the past few years, however, shorter, irregular seasons have forced ski resorts to adapt, either by using snow machines far more than expected, or preparing for fewer customers. Today, we're looking at how skiing, and winter sports, are changing across the Granite State. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 10, 2017

Mar 9, 2017

The N.H. legislature had a full calendar this week, debating changes to the state’s election laws, transgender rights and marijuana decriminalization.  N.H.'s congressional delegation reacts to President Trump's revised travel ban, and assesses the impact in  N.H, and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions makes a surprise visit to an N.H. youth summit on opioid abuse.


The Southern Illinoisian

Their mug shots are now regularly featured in the news -- people swept up in Operation Granite Hammer, an anti-drug enforcement program that started in 2015. Since then, police have made more than 100 drug arrests. They have been particularly tough on dealers whose deals turn lethal, pursuing long sentences in those cases.  But many on the treatment end warn tough sentences and tactics do little to quell the demand for drugs, and dealers themselves are often addicts, who need care, not incarceration.


Fred McNeill

Too often, says civil engineer Fred McNeill, it takes a disaster – sinkholes swallowing cars or dam bursts flooding communities -- to get the attention of officials and others who fund the underpinnings of wastewater treatment and dam infrastructure.  

Allegra Boverman; NHPR

Both President Trump and Governor Sununu released details about proposed budget plans within the last few weeks, so we'll discuss the impacts of these plans, including increased defense spending, and more funds for managing the opioid crisis. We'll also look at current wage and unemployment statistics in the state, and how Granite Staters feel about their economy. 


Amy Quinton; NHPR

Officials overseeing the state’s dams and wastewater treatment plants say they’re heartened by calls for more investment in infrastructure by Governor Sununu and President Trump.

But they're also alarmed by the Trump Administration’s proposed cuts to the EPA.

Speaking on The Exchange, Fred McNeill, Chief Engineer at Manchester’s Environmental Protection Division, says the EPA funds several state positions that help maintain and improve the city’s one thousand miles of underground water infrastructure.  McNeill is concerned these jobs may now be eliminated.

Kieth Shields; NHPR

A continuation of our series on New Hampshire infrastructure: wastewater and dam structures are old, crumbling, and vulnerable to severe weather. Intense storms, flooding, and drought have all contributed to the damage, and many of our dams and underground pipes are over 100 years old. We'll discuss the challenges with tackling this problem, including lack of funding, and stricter regulation requirements.


New Hampshire Public Radio

Not too long ago, New Hampshire was faulted for casting too wide a net when it came to institutionalizing people with mental illness.  That led to a lawsuit and a $30 million settlement, with the state agreeing to boost community-based care.

Now, though, according to Ken Norton, executive director of the NH chapter of the Alliance on Mental Illness, the state has swung too far in the other direction, with inadequate access to institutionalized care:

New Hampshire Public Radio

Under a court settlement, the state agreed to boost support for community-based services, with the aim of keeping people out of institutions like psychiatric hospitals. But the need for this kind of care has not abated, raising the question: Does the state need to re-think how it spends it mental health resources, to shore up both ends of the system?


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 3, 2017

Mar 2, 2017

Governor Chris Sununu returns from a trip to Washington bullish on block grants and President Trump.  New Hampshire's  all-democratic congressional delegation have different views of the President and his address to Congress.  Here in New Hampshire, a North Country judge drops murder charges for Celina Cass's stepfather due to mental competency. 


37 INK

Enslaved to George Washington, Judge escaped to New Hampshire during Washington's presidency. She was relentlessly pursed by Washington, who sought to regain what he thought of as his property. Decades later, she revealed her story as one of the few early female fugitives. We sit down with the author of a new book on Judge's life. 


Rogue Heroes: The History of the S.A.S

Feb 28, 2017

In his book "Rogue Heroes" author Ben Macintyre describes the origins of Britain's notoriously secret special forces unit, the S.A.S.  The inspiration for special forces around the world, the S.A.S. was originally made up of eccentric rogues and miscreants  who did not fit into the ranks of the regular Army. Their motto "who dares wins" became the most famous military motto in Britain.


Anticipating Trump's Budget Proposal

Feb 27, 2017

We preview President Trump's first federal budget proposal.  We've learned to expect the unexpected from Trump; will that trend continue when he releases his budget in the next few weeks? We examine which campaign promises may become reality, look at where tax cuts may apply, and examine the prognosis for the ACA, entitlements and immigration.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Compared with the University System of New Hampshire, which was flat funded under the budget Republican Governor Chris Sununu presented earlier this month, the community college system did pretty well.

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