The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 8 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on iTunes, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Next Week on The Exchange:

Monday, 5/23 - Turmoil in the Democratic Primary

Tuesday, 5/24 - Mental Health in the Community

Wednesday, 5/25 - N.H. Economic Roundup

Thursday, 5/26 - Vitamania Book

Friday, 5/27 - Friday N.H. News Roundup

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - May 27, 2016

6 hours ago

We'll be discussing the recent class action lawsuits by residents with private wells near the Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics plant in Merrimack.  Saint-Gobain is the likely source of water contamination in the area, according to state officials.  With  bipartisan fanfare, New Hampshire launches the first statewide initiative of a national campaign called Change Direction, promoting more open discussion of mental illness.   Plus, the legislature winds up it's session with negotiation on issues from police body cameras to mandatory minimum sentences to short-term rentals like AirBNB.

stevendepolo / flickr.com

We think we know all about vitamins, but according to author Catherine Price, most of us know nothing about these thirteen invisible chemicals.  Over the century since they were discovered, vitamins have changed human destiny by preventing and curing many diseases.  Price's "Vitamania" points out that these micronutrients have also taken on a life of their own in the hands of marketers, affecting how we think about health, and the decisions we make about what we eat.


tinafranklindg / flickr cc

We examine several key indicators and their impact on the Granite state.  One is rising inflation.  Another is consumer debt:  Americans are spending more, but we're also borrowing -- to the tune of nearly one trillion dollars.  Also, a new report finds a worrisome trend: business formation in small towns and rural counties has dropped dramatically.

Casey McDermott / NHPR

State leaders recently joined the medical and mental health community to launch  "Change Direction NH," part of a national initiative to raise awareness of mental health disorders and  eliminate the stigma around these issues.  Long considered an afterthought to physical well being, mental health has gained recognition as having equal importance, although it's still not easy for many to discuss or seek help. Change Direction NH attempts to fix that, promoting awareness of the signs of mental illness.  Still, challenges remain, including access to treatment.  


Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The once-polite democratic presidential races has turned bitter. Sanders's supporters are increasingly agitated about the nomination process, while Clinton's campaign says the numbers strongly favor her and it's time to unify. And some activists want the DNC chair to resign, while others say all this just helps Donald Trump.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup - May 20, 2016

May 20, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top New Hampshire news stories of the week: Exxon Mobil loses a lengthy court battle over water contamination in the state, which means millions for cleanup; last week's shooting of two Manchester police officers revives the debate over mental illness and access to guns; and the Granite State retains its single area code status, at least for now.


Smart Sign / Flickr/CC

The Obama administration's recent directive addressing the use of school bathrooms and other facilities by transgender students heightened a debate playing out in several states over so-called bathroom bills and transgender rights.  We'll look at how New Hampshire schools and communities are responding.


Steve Lum / Flickr/CC

With the lilacs every spring comes an unwelcome harbinger of the season: black-legged ticks. And with New Hampshire near the top of the list of states with the highest incidence of Lyme disease, Granite Staters take this tiny arachnid seriously. We'll find out what's new this season in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention when it comes to this tick-borne illness.

Prescription Drug Treatment Info / Flickr/CC

As health care costs overall have continued to rise, medicines are driving a good share of that trend. We'll look at some of the factors at play, including advertising, patents, and government programs and regulations -- also, plans underway on Capitol Hill to address the issue. 

GUESTS:

Library of Congress

Founded in the 1830s, the Queen City's Amoskeag Manufacturing Company became an industrial powerhouse of international renown, making Manchester a magnet for immigrant laborers and later, union activism. We're talking with two Granite State historians about this period and its relevance today.


freestateproject.org

They volunteer at food pantries and sled-dog races. They exhibit negative and disruptive behavior.

Those are the competing impressions among some Granite State residents when it comes to members of the Free State Project, the so-called “liberty-minded” group that recently announced success in encouraging 20,000 people from around the country to move to New Hampshire to further their agenda of less government and more personal freedom. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - May 13, 2016

May 13, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top N.H. news stories of the week: state lawmakers take up a final flurry of bills, including several addressing the opioid crisis; veteran state senators announce they will not run for reelection, leaving six out of twenty-four seats open; and after years of reports of declining bee populations, UNH researchers are abuzz with news of seventeen new bee species.


freestateproject.org

Recently, this movement announced success in its plan to encourage twenty-thousand libertarian-minded people from around the country to move to New Hampshire.  And already, Free Staters have had an influence on Granite State politics, although it's not always been welcome.  We'll check in on this project and its impact.

Read a summary of the hour-long conversation here.

CollectoratorToo / Flickr/CC

Why get married?  That's a question many Americans are asking these days - with rates of people tying the knot lower now than any time in U.S. History.  And even those who do get hitched are waiting longer, with average marriage ages up for both sexes.  We’ll look at these trends, what's behind them, and what their impacts may be.


Ivo Rocha Jr / Flickr/CC

We’ll check in with where the Northern Pass project stands, and what’s next in the process.

 

GUESTS:

 

ihaveadreamorgeon / Flickr/CC

With the number of diagnoses and prescriptions on a twenty-year rise, these days, having a kid with ADHD is no longer outside the norm. Still: there's plenty of disagreement over the nature of the diagnosis itself, when medication can help kids, and when other approaches might be better. 

This program was originally broadcast on January 19, 2016.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - May 6, 2016

May 6, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top new stories of the week: the first district congressional race gets a little less crowded, as Republican State Rep Pam Tucker drops out; lawmakers propose converting the former Laconia State School into a substance abuse treatment center; and Governor Hassan issues her first veto of the year, for a bill concerning local building inspections.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

In this tumultuous election, delegate math has a source of contention, with some calling the process rigged and many Americans scratching their heads about how much their votes matter.  And while the Indiana primary may have quelled some uncertainty for the GOP, questions remain. Meanwhile, on the Democratic side, the delegate hunt continues.

A House Divided: Islam in Today's Middle East

May 4, 2016
empty spaces08 / Flickr/CC

While these two Muslim groups have often co-existed peacefully over the course of history, in our time, sectarian differences have risen and boiled over, resulting in conflicts across the Middle East. Our guest is a longtime Middle East scholar who examines the religious, economic, and political factors involved.

University of the Fraser Valley vis Flickr CC https://flic.kr/p/eJ1MhR

A recent study finds New Hampshire families pay some of the highest rates in the nation for childcare. We explore the economics of the issue, including the financial challenges facing childcare centers and the impact on the state's workforce. We also look at solutions being explored by lawmakers in Concord and on Capitol Hill.

Screen grab from airbnb.com

While the debate about services like Airbnb is loudest in cities such as San Francisco and New York, it's also made inroads in less urban places like New Hampshire. We look at concerns over the lack of regulation, as well as the opportunities. Then, at the end of the hour, we'll discuss Uber, another major sharing economy company growing in the Granite State.
 

GUESTS:

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - April 29, 2016

Apr 29, 2016
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

We're covering the top new stories of the week: the Statehouse addresses a number of issues, including marijuana penalties, gun permits, and what to do with a sizeable revenue surplus. And the Democratic race in New Hampshire's first congressional district becomes more heated and bitter.

Jacqui Jade O'Donnell / Flickr/CC

From petting zoos to pick-your-own, farmers across New Hampshire are diversifying in new ways to stay afloat. But that’s raising tensions in some towns, where neighbors say large-scale events like weddings can be a nuisance. We look at the impact of a recent state Supreme Court ruling on the issue and how lawmakers are exploring solutions.

Kinder Morgan / http://www.kindermorgan.com/content/docs/TGP_Northeast_Energy_Direct_Fact_Sheet.pdf

The energy company's announcement that it had suspended the controversial three billion dollar proposal prompted celebration among the project's opponents who considered the pipeline dangerous and unnecessary. But others warn that without more infrastructure, energy costs will rise.

NHPR

After years of little to no growth in wages, Granite State workers may see their paychecks fatten.  Spring has sprung for the construction industry, especially on the Seacoast and in the Manchester area.   And a national ranking finds what many New Hampshire parents already know:  child care here is among the priciest in the nation.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - April 22, 2016

Apr 21, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top news stories of the week: including dozens of bills under consideration by state lawmakers, including a proposal to allow officials to investigate parents suspected of opioid dependence, and news that Harriet Tubman will be the new face on the front of the twenty dollar bill, a move applauded by U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen, an early promoter of the idea.

GUESTS:

How Wild Should New Hampshire Be?

Apr 21, 2016
THE SHARED EXPERIENCE / Flickr/CC, BIT.LY/23A9KSV

Rocky ledges and mountain vistas draw many a hiker and biker to New England, to the point where some trails have become a bit too popular for those seeking an escape from civilization. It's something of a dilemma for nature lovers: How to balance recreation with preservation, and who decides how wild the wilderness should be? We discuss a story involving the Appalachian Trail that illustrates this quandary and is featured on Outside/In, NHPR's new show about the natural world and how we use it, hosted by Sam Evans-Brown, and premiering Friday, April 22, at 3 p.m. on NHPR

Sara Plourde / NHPR

With every census, states have the chance to re-draw political boundaries based on population changes.  Usually, the legislature controls the process, giving the party in power much greater influence. We're examining how this has affected New Hampshire's voting districts, the balance of power at the Statehouse, and other approaches taken elsewhere.

Ana Ulin / Flickr/CC

Some insist these sweeping pacts help the overall economy, leading to more affordable goods and raising the standard of living for Americans. But others argue they displace workers and lead to lower wages. We examine this debate, including how it's playing out in the presidential campaign, and the role trade plays in New Hampshire's economy.

This program was part of an NPR initiative called A Nation Engaged.

TSCeleb News / Flickr/CC

With more attention to problems in police-community relations around the country, one change that nearly everyone agrees on in the Granite State is the need for more body cameras. We'll discuss a bill that proposes rules for New Hampshire law enforcement that may opt to use the technology, addressing questions of privacy, effectiveness, storage, protocol, and cost.

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