The Exchange

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. NHPR listeners have a daily forum to discuss important issues and speak directly with elected officials.
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Next week on The Exchange:

Monday, 8/31: AEI President Arthur Brooks’ ‘The Conservative Heart’

Tuesday, 9/1: New Hampshire Drug Czar John Wozmak

Wednesday, 9/2: Political Junkie Ken Rudin

Thursday, 9/3: N.H. First in the Nation Primary

Friday, 9/4: Friday N.H. News Roundup

woodfin / Flickr/CC

The New Hampshire presidential primary celebrates its 100th birthday next year, and a new book chronicles those many decades, including lots of primary lore. It also examines whether the first primary really has as much power over the nomination process as many believe it to.
GUESTS:

iprimages / Flickr/CC

While Donald Trump continues to dominate on the GOP side of the presidential primary race, Carly Fiorina and Ben Carson make substantial gains in Iowa. Meanwhile, Democratic front-runner Hilary Clinton appears to lose her stride, with more liberals around the country ‘feeling the Bern.’ And President Obama heads to Alaska to talk climate change. 

Guest:

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Since appointed by Governor Hassan to lead the fight against an epidemic of heroin and opioid abuse, Wozmak has faced some political pushback and a budget impasse. We’ll talk with him about that and hear his plan for marshaling the state’s resources to tackle drug abuse and overdose deaths.

GUEST:

  • Jack Wozmak – New Hampshire’s senior director of Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health for the Governor’s Office, also known as the state’s ‘drug czar.’
     

We’re talking with Arthur Brooks, prominent conservative and president of the American Enterprise Institute. In his new book, he says that conservatism has for too long been a movement of the head instead of the heart. The book also includes his blueprint for a more prosperous America, and his social justice agenda for what he calls the New Right.

GUESTS:

  • Arthur Brooks – president of the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C.
Tiger Pixel / Flickr / Creative Commons

What began as a pet project for computer programmers and digital-privacy activists is today a financial technology worth billions of dollars. Author Nathaniel Popper takes us behind the scenes of that dramatic transformation and looks ahead at how this digital currency could shape the global economy of the future.

Andreas Levers / Flickr/cc

Roughly seventeen million Americans suffer from alcoholism, making it the country’s most prevalent addiction. We’ll look at efforts in New Hampshire to address this. Plus, we’ll hear from critics and supporters of the most commonly prescribed approach to treating the disease, Alcoholics Anonymous.

Elizabeth / Flickr/CC

After allowing their six and ten year old children to walk a mile home by themselves, a Maryland couple are fighting accusations of child neglect. The case has inflamed a familiar argument over how much supervision and independence children need. We’ll look behind the clichés and get the range of views on free-range parenting.

Morgan / Flickr/CC

Less Medicine, More Health. That’s the contradictory-sounding title of a new book by Dartmouth researcher and Doctor Gilbert Welch. It’s a challenge to the conventional wisdom among patients and providers that more testing and more treatment is always better.  Welch says in some cases, you can have too much health care – and can even be harmed by it.

Assessing Greek Life On College Campuses

Aug 24, 2015
Tbass Effendi / Flickr/cc

Fraternities have been getting more bad press lately after embarrassing incidents from racist chants in Oklahoma to the branding of pledges here in New Hampshire. We’ll look at the headlines, but also behind them, including what the data says about the impact of fraternity and sorority life for students from grades to personal health.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - August 21, 2015

Aug 21, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top news stories of the week: GOP Presidential contenders come to Londonderry, wrangling over Common Core at an education summit, a five million dollar White House initiative focused on heroin promises help for East coast states including New Hampshire, and a sinkhole big enough to swallow a car snarls traffic on I-93. 

Eversource

Officials with Northern Pass, the controversial hydropower project, have announced an offer to bury an additional fifty-two miles of power lines – roughly a third of the total. But opponents still have concerns, including impacts on the environment and property values. We’ll get the latest, hear from both sides, and find out what might be next. 

Brett Levin / Flickr/CC

We  sit down with Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer, who is in New Hampshire talking about his efforts to ease federal marijuana laws. It’s a huge debate going on around the country, as more states move toward medical marijuana, decriminalization, and, in a few cases, legalization.

Michael Coughlin / Flickr/CC

We talk with author Pete Earley, whose book “Crazy” examines how prisons and jails have become warehouses for people with mental illness. Earley describes his own struggle to help his bipolar son avoid incarceration, as well as the wider mental health system of a “revolving door” between hospitals and prisons.  

New Hampshire Tourism: What Brings Visitors?

Aug 17, 2015
Quiggyt4, ShellMotorSportsUS, weesam2010 / Flickr/CC

Maine is known for its lobster and coast, and Vermont for its quaint villages and bucolic scenery. But what draws tourists to the Granite State?  Our visitors are a mixed group – from Nascar fans to rock climbers to those who love tax free shopping.  We’ll find out what pulls people here, and whether the state’s brand could use an update. 

Friday N.H. News Roundup - August 14, 2015

Aug 14, 2015
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

We're checking in on the top news stories of the week: Granite State Democrats are upset with the national party’s debate rules, and a schedule that puts New Hampshire’s event right before Christmas.  Former Congresswoman Carol Shea Porter aims to retake the first district seat she lost last year.  And a federal court rejects New Hampshire’s ban on so-called “ballot selfies.”

joeshoe / Flickr/CC

As internet natives, brought up in the digital age, today’s young activists are increasingly turning to online platforms to organize and communicate. From Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter to the ALS ice bucket challenge, social movements have begun to enlist the mobilizing force of social media.

DonnaG / Flickr/CC

After the GOP debates, Donald Trump continues to rile the race, while Carly Fiorina gains praise for a strong performance. On the Democratic side, the crowds for Bernie Sanders continue to grow.  Meanwhile, President Obama campaigns for his Iran nuclear deal, and protests rose this weekend in Ferguson on the anniversary of Michael Brown’s death.

U.S. National Archives / Flickr/CC

This month, there’s been a lot of attention to the rules and regulations around casting a ballot, with last week’s fiftieth anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, and a federal appeals court rejecting a Texas voter I.D. law.  We’re discussing how and why most states have tightened up their voting requirements, including New Hampshire.

Scrutinizing Supplements: The Hype And The Hope

Aug 10, 2015
Clean Wal-Mart / Flickr/cc

Millions of Americans swear by them, from the daily multivitamin to herbal remedies claiming to cure various ailments. And while some supplements have solid science behind them, others have been questioned by research. Meanwhile, recent reports have found that some products don’t contain the ingredients listed on their labels.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - August 7, 2015

Aug 7, 2015
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

We're discussing the top stories of the week: executive councilors vote to cut funding for Planned Parenthood, amid national controversy surrounding the group,  severe weather causes the collapse of a circus tent, killing a father and daughter and prompting an investigation, and GOP presidential candidates engage in their first official debate days after the Voters First forum in Manchester.


Immigration and the Campaign Trail

Aug 6, 2015
John McIntosh / Flickr/CC

It’s been a top issue this primary season: how to fix what most everyone agrees is a system in need of reform. The remedies vary, from bolstering the border to establishing a path to citizenship.  In some cases, as with GOP candidate Donald Trump, the rhetoric has been heated. We’ll look at how this issue is playing out among both parties.

m.p.3. / Flickr/CC

After the recent crisis, the Greek economy is only slightly more stable ground. Meanwhile, economic uncertainty afflicts other countries in the Eurozone, which binds nineteen nations into a single currency.  Americans meanwhile are watching the turmoil and wondering what’s at skate for them in Europe’s struggles.

Does Homework Matter? N.H. Educators Weigh In

Aug 3, 2015
Marco Nedermeijer / Flickr/CC

The emerging focus in New Hampshire on what’s called “competency-based” education, emphasizes mastery of a subject over time in class or number of worksheets completed.  But traditional homework has many defenders, who say it solidifies class learning and fosters good study habits.

  This program was originally broadcast on January 8, 2015.

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - July 31, 2015

Jul 31, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

After a fiscal committee vote, the top official taksed with coordinating the state's response to substance abuse keeps his job, despite criticism from some Republicans for falling short. Local activists on both sides of the abortion issue face off over funding for Planned Parenthood after anti-abortion activists release secretly taped videos. New Jersey governor and Republican presidential candidate Chris Christie holds his fifteenth town hall while Hillary Clinton holds her second.

Wikimedia Commons

He was governor of New Hampshire, the first head of the Social Security Administration, and U.S. ambassador to Great Britain during World War II. Yet John Gilbert Winant remains little known among Americans. We unearth the history of this unsung Granite Stater and hear about an effort to memorialize his contributions.

Army Medicine / Flickr CC

Whether they have insurance or not, many Americans have trouble affording dental care. This leaves many adults -and children- forgoing needed dental care that leads to bigger health problems down the road. But  medical research and many doctors are promoting the idea that insurance for oral health should not be separated from general health insurance, setting the stage for potential reforms to the way we treat the health of our teeth.

The Politics of Polling Ahead of the Primary

Jul 28, 2015
IowaPolitics.com / Flickr CC

We look at how pollsters collect data and how that data affects the political process in this upcoming 2016 presidential primary.

masha krasnova-shabaeva via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/4set22

How much sleep do you need and how do you get it? We explore these and other sleep-related questions with the latest on sleep research.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - July 24, 2015

Jul 24, 2015

We're following the top New Hampshire news stories of the week. Governor Hassan makes a budget overture that Republicans find lacking. New Hampshire residents take up arms to defend military recruiting centers. And more visits from presidential candidates, including the latest entrant, Ohio governor John Kasich.

An Update on No Child Left Behind

Jul 24, 2015
butterflymosaics / Flickr CC

Fourteen years after the implementation of the education program, the federal government attempts to rework education standards from this controversial act. We'll look at how Common Core standards and NCLB overlap, or differ, and what changes this could bring to our school systems.

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