The Exchange

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. NHPR listeners have a daily forum to discuss important issues and speak directly with elected officials.

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Next week on The Exchange:

Monday, 11/23: Special Legislative Session & Anti-Drug Task Force

Tuesday, 11/24: Suburban Poverty

Wednesday, 11/25: Thanksgiving Tales, Tips, & Travails

Thursday, 11/26: Special Holiday Programming

Friday, 11/27: Rebroadcast


Tales and Travails of Thanksgiving Day

File Photo Digital Archive / Flickr/CC

From burnt pies to traffic jams to last year's giant power outage, everyone has a story to tell about this uniquely American holiday.  We'll hear tales from around the Granite State about how we gather on this day, and look at what makes Thanksgiving so linked to tradition.


Poverty Moves to the Suburbs

22 hours ago
Kayla Wicker / Flickr/CC

Rural and inner-city poverty often get most of the attention, but now, poverty in American suburbia is growing fastest. We're looking at why this is happening, how these trends play out in New Hampshire, and the ways in which low-income struggles here differ.





Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Approved by a special legislative session, a newly minted task force will spend the next weeks considering several options for tackling the state’s drug problem, which has claimed more than five hundred lives in the last two years. The goal is to craft legislation quickly -- in time for the January return of the legislature.


Friday N.H. News Roundup - November 20, 2015

Nov 20, 2015
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

We're looking at the top stories of the week: responding to the attacks in Paris, Governor Hassan joins twenty nine Republican governors in asking President Obama to hold off on accepting refugees from Syria, lawmakers meet in a special session to address the state's opioid crisis, and state environmental officials deliver a possible setback to the Northern Pass Project.


Jeff L / Flickr/CC

Even as this feud was still going on, back in the summer of 2014, experts on labor unions, corporate governance, and employee culture were noting just how unprecedented the boycott was. Now, there's a new book and a forthcoming film examining this epic battle and exploring its ramifications.


After months of scrutiny for abuse and neglect, this residential facility for people with brain injuries and developmental disabilities closed. We're following up on an investigation by NHPR and the radio program Reveal about the history of the center, its connections to similar facilities nationwide - and what this means for a vulnerable population.



Phil Roeder / Flickr/CC

We head over to the Hawkeye state - Iowa - to check in on the other "First in the Nation" contest, with Iowa's caucuses coming about a week before New Hampshire's presidential primary next year.  We'll find out what the candidates are saying, and how they're playing, in Iowa. 


  • Ben Kiefer -  host of IPR’s daily noon talk show River to River, which he also helps produce.


The Paris Attacks: Reactions in the Aftermath

Nov 16, 2015
Roman Boed / Flickr/CC

The attacks on Paris over the weekend shook the world, and although some questions are starting to be answered, there are still a lot of question marks surrounding the event.


Friday N.H. News Roundup - November 13, 2015

Nov 13, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top news stories of the week.


  • Sam Evans-Brown - NHPR's environment and education reporter
  • Dean Spiliotes - civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at Southern New Hampshire University and author of the website, N.H. Political Capital.
  • Paul Steinhauser - NH1's political director and anchor
  • Rik Stevens - Northern New England correspondent for the Associated Press
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

GOP presidential candidate and Ohio Governor John Kasich sits down for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. The forum was recorded live-to-tape on Thursday, November 12th in front of a live audience.

Listen to the full conversation right here:

This event is a partnership between New Hampshire Public Radio and Concord Young Professionals. Broadcast times: Thursday, November 12, at 8pm and Monday November 16th at 9am and 8pm.

Live tweets from the forum:

Special Broadcast: An NHPR and Reveal Investigation

Nov 11, 2015
Anna Vignet for Reveal

We're broadcasting this month's episode of Reveal, an investigative news program from the Center for Investigative Reporting.

You can hear the episode and read the accompanying story right here,

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Recent polling shows that many Americans in both political parties agree that it’s a serious problem. But while they are unhappy with the influx of big money donors into elections made possible by the Citizens United ruling, they also seem pessimistic about changing the system. Still, some have made this a top priority, claiming that meaningful campaign finance reform is essential to a healthy democracy.


New Hampshire's Lead Poisoning Problem

Nov 9, 2015
Diego Torres Silvestre / Flickr/CC

While the harmful effects of lead on young children have been well-documented for decades, public health experts say the issue remains a major concern in this state and that stronger policies are needed.  We'll look at efforts to curb the impact and prevent future poisoning, and also why change has been so difficult.


Friday N.H. News Roundup - November 6, 2015

Nov 6, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're following the top news stories of the week: Governor Hassan’s call for a special legislative session to tackle the opioid crisis meets resistance from some Republicans who call it political grandstanding, Presidential candidates begin officially filing for the First in the Nation primary, and, in municipal elections, incumbent mayors fare well, though Ted Gatsas’s slim victory margin may mean a recount in Manchester.


Processing the Risks of Red Meat

Nov 5, 2015
cookbookman17 / Flickr/CC

Recently, the World Health Organization identified processed meat such as bacon and hot dogs as carcinogens, and cast doubt on the consumption of regular red meat as well. But champions of meat say the warnings are misleading, exaggerated, and a steak dinner can still be enjoyed. We cut deeper into the issue, exploring the pros and cons of meat for health.


PeterHDK / Flickr/CC

In his new book, Josh Levs says many dads today want to engage with their families, but old office stereotypes prevail, with corporate policies standing in the way.  He says that hurts not only fathers, but families and businesses as well.

This program was originally broadcast on 9/16/15.



Push to Make N.H.'s Drug Court System Statewide

Nov 3, 2015
Larry Leach / Flickr/CC

Six of New Hampshire’s ten counties have this alternative system, meant to help low-level drug offenders gain treatment and avoid incarceration. Now, proposed legislation would create incentives for the other four counties to set up drug courts. We’ll look at how these work and why they’ve gained such widespread support, and also the questions that routinely come up. 


silvaer / Flickr/CC

After years of headlines on the ‘obesity epidemic’, the number of Americans dealing with this condition is leveling off. Awareness has increased, nutrition improved, and programs have been put in place, but it remains a stubborn problem, with research showing connections to less-recognized issues like poverty, race, and stigma.


Friday N.H. News Roundup - October 30, 2015

Oct 30, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top news stories of the week: an education-funding battle heats up, with the state attorney general, lawmakers, and high-profile lawyers weighing in, retired Supreme Court Justice David Souter and former U.S. Senator Judd Gregg make a pitch for civics education, and presidential heavy hitters, including Clinton and Trump, take to the stump again in the Granite State.


Primary 2016: Foreign Policy on the Campaign Trail

Oct 29, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at what the candidates are saying about America’s role in the world: how to deal with terrorism and handle the numerous conflicts in the Middle East, what to do about fraught relations with Russia, China and North Korea, and how best to respond to the refugee crisis in Europe and conduct trade in the global area.


Matt Dove / Flickr/CC

Also known as the “banking act of 1933,” this law stemmed from the 1920s stock market crash and Great Depression that followed, with restrictions on banks and other financial institutions. Glass-Steagall was overturned about twenty years ago, but some are pushing to bring it back.


Making Sense of New Mammogram Guidelines

Oct 27, 2015
Finance & Commerce / Flickr/CC

The American Cancer Society has issued new recommendation, raising the age for screenings from forty to forty five, saying that too many false positives have led to unnecessary and even harmful treatment. Other organizations, however suggest other ages for the test.


New Hampshire's Charter Schools: A Growing Choice

Oct 26, 2015
Jaddie Dodd / Flickr/CC

New Hampshire now has 25 of these alternative public schools, after a spate of rapid growth. We’ll look at some of the themes raised in NHPR’s recent series, A Growing Choice.  These include how charter schools are funded, who their students are, and what overall role they play in public education. 


Eversource submits its long-awaited formal Northern Pass application to state reviewers, kicking off a long evaluation process. Nashua schools debate keeping Narcan on hand, used in drug overdoses.  And candidates for mayor debate in several New Hampshire cities, including Nashua, Manchester, and Keene. 


Garry Rayno - Statehouse reporter for the New Hampshire Union Leader and Sunday News. 

Tracking Presidential Candidates on Social Media

Oct 22, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at the proliferation of political speech in this tumultuous presidential season, and its impact on voters.  We’ll examine how campaigns and voters are navigating this brave new world of media, including the vast and sometimes viral dimension of social media -- and explore its implications for our democracy.


•  Lara Brown  - Graduate School of Political Management’s Political Management Program Director and an associate professor at George Washington University

Ventura County Democratic Party / Flickr/CC

From Adams to Kennedy to Bush and Clinton, our guest Stephen Hess says that politics as the “family business” is nothing new. In his book, he profiles eighteen of these political clans: how power passes on, how it can be lost, and why many Americans are so uncomfortable with this concept. 


Bendygo / Flickr/CC

In recent years, New Hampshire has seen rapid growth in solar power. With the approaching cap on a solar development incentive known as net metering, though, many in the industry say they can’t expand much more.  We’ll find out what’s going on, and how bright or dim the future might be for solar in the Granite State.


Brandon Bartoszek / Flickr/CC

Canada votes today to elect a new federal government. We’ll discuss the issues that have defined the campaign, including the Keystone pipeline and Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal; and explore how the election results could affect the US-Canada relationship.


Friday N.H. News Roundup - October 16, 2015

Oct 16, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're talking about the top New Hampshire headlines of the week: a bi-partisan group of politicos gathers in Manchester, at the No-Labels convention, a huge number of Derry residents turn out for a special election, and say no to budget cuts, the city of Franklin pulls back on its plan to impose a curfew, and Fish and Game pushes ahead with a controversial bobcat trapping proposal.


OZinOH / Flickr/CC

The High Court recently kicked off its fall term, with a docket full of hot-button social issues, including abortion and birth control.  Other highly watched cases concern unions among public sector workers and the use of affirmative action in college admissions.  We’re looking at what’s ahead and which way the court might go.


  • John Greabe – law professor at UNH School of Law
  • David Savage – Supreme Court and legal issues reporter for the Los Angeles Times