The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 8 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.


Click here to get our podcast on iTunes, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 10/24 - Revisiting the Minimum Wage Debate

Tuesday, 10/25 - 9am: Rebr: Manchester Mills; 8pm U.S. Senate Forum on Business & the Economy

Wednesday, 10/26 -  9am: U.S. Senate Forum on Business & the Economy; 8pm Manchester Mills

Thursday, 10/27 -  Conversations with the Candidates: Carol Shea-Porter, Democratic candidate for N.H.'s 1st Congressional District 

Friday, 10/28 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup

Library of Congress

Founded in the 1830s, the Queen City's Amoskeag Manufacturing Company became an industrial powerhouse of international renown, making Manchester a magnet for immigrant laborers and later, union activism. We're talking with two Granite State historians about this period and its relevance today.

  This program was originally broadcast on 5/16/16.


It's a contentious issue in the upcoming election, and in the Granite State, politicians remain strongly divided. New Hampshire still has the lowest minimum in New England, at seven-twenty-five an hour.  State leaders remain divided on how to increase wages without harming business and raising prices. 


  We continue our "Conversations with the Candidates" series with 1st District Congressman Frank Guinta. The Republican from Manchester is running for re-election as a pro-small-business fiscal conservative.  Guinta also touts his bi-partisan credentials - on issues such as the heroin epidemic. 

Biocontrol: Fighting Invasives with...Invasives

Oct 19, 2016
Macroscopic Solutions / flickr/cc

 We kick off the second season of NHPR's newest show, Outside/In, with a discussion of  biological control: using non-native species to combat destructive invasive pests and plants that are decimating a local species.  It's the focus of the Outside/In episode titled "Never Bring a Sledgehammer to a Scalpel Fight."  This approach to managing invasive species, used by scientists for over a century, has had some spectacular failures, but there have been many success stories as well.  We'll look at the history of the approach, the arguments for and against, and examine the philosophical implications.  Is biological control messing with Mother Nature or our only hope against invasive species changing the landscape?   

Christina Phillips

The Exchange's Laura Knoy and Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers sit down with New Hampshire political candidates in front of a live audience at the NHPR Studio, to ask a wide variety of questions, including those submitted by the audience and NHPR listeners.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016: Governor Maggie Hassan, Democratic Candidate for U.S. Senate

Steven Depolo: Flickr

Before the final presidential face-off on Wednesday, we evaluate the structure and history of debating, from format to questions to the moderator's role.  Also, we look at how debates this election cycle measure up to debates past, and the big question: whether these events actually influence voters.

Doby Photography; NPR

We sit down with Corey Flintoff, longtime NPR Russia Correspondent. Flintoff has returned to the U.S., with tales of his many years reporting overseas. We talk with him about some of the big stories he covered, including Russian aggression in Ukraine, and allegations of Russian meddling in America's presidential election. 

Our Conversations with the Candidates series continues with Jim Lawrence, Republican contender for the second Congressional district.  The first African American nominated by a major party to run for Congress in New Hampshire, Lawrence says he wants to break the political gridlock in Washington and reign in the size and scope of government. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - October 14, 2016

Oct 13, 2016

Recent political events cause turbulence down-ballot for New Hampshire candidates. Seventy percent of the drug deaths confirmed in New Hampshire so far this year have been caused by Fentanyl.  And work is underway  to pipe clean water to homes with wells contaminated by PFOA. We discuss this and other New Hampshire news. 


According to a Census Bureau report, household incomes have gone up. Global trade is a hot campaign issue, and we'll  look at how it impacts New Hampshire. And JP Morgan Chase plans to move six hundred jobs out of Salem.


Even as the state moves forward with plans for meeting the mental health needs of Granite Staters, workers in this field, from psychiatrists to specially trained nurses, are scarce. The factors are many, ranging from inadequate salaries to licensing boards that make it difficult for job seekers to cross state lines. 

Are Parents Trying Too Hard?

Oct 10, 2016

After helicopter parenting and tiger moms, a new book tells American parents to back off!  We talk with  developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik  about her book, The Gardener and The Carpenter.  Gopnik draws on the science of the human brain and evolution to make the argument that children are hard-wired to learn on their own.  We discuss the two possible ways of thinking about the role of parents suggested by the book's title and look at insights the new science offers into the relationship between parents and kids. 

GUEST:   Alison Gopnik, professor of psychology and philosphy at University of California, Berkeley.

2016 Presidential Race: Uncharted Territory

Oct 10, 2016
Josh Rogers NHPR

We take a moment, fewer than 30 days from the election, to evaluate the recent turn of events in the Presidential race.  An 11-year old video, in which Republican nominee Donald Trump talked crudely about groping women, prompts N.H.'s Senator Kelly Ayotte to join a growing wave of Republican lawmakers unwilling to vote for the Republican nominee, or even calling for him to step down. We review the second presidential debate featuring questions from undecided voters as well as the two moderators.  And we consider whether the Republican party can hang on to control in Congress, and how the GOP, seemingly in crisis, can rebound.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - October 7, 2016

Oct 6, 2016

With just about a month to go before the election, the debate season is in full swing. We look at the recent U.S. Senate debate that included a comment by Senator Kelly Ayotte that went viral.  Things get testy in the first televised gubernatorial debate between Chris Sununu and Colin van Ostern.  The state's rainy day fund swells to $90 million, and, with no rainfall in the forecast, state officials warn drought conditions could worsen. 

Jessica Hunt

The Granite State is dangerously dry. New Hampshire has received about half of the normal rainfall this year; as the colder weather sets in, we talk to experts about the effects of water scarcity, and how the state is handling the drought. 

Preparing for the Flu Season; Tracking Fall Foliage

Oct 4, 2016
Credit: NIAID on Flickr

The first case of the flu has already been reported in New Hampshire. We get the best estimate on this year's flu forecast, and the efficacy and duration of flu inoculations.  Then we pivot to another harbinger of the colder temperatures ahead: New Hampshire's always-impressive fall foliage.  We discuss the notion of "peak" foliage and how the season gives the Granite State it's sense of identity.

Credit: NHPR

Read All About It: Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Maggie Hassan recently joined NHPR's Laura Knoy and Josh Rogers for an hour-long discussion -- part of our Conversations with the Candidates series. 

An Update on New Hampshire's U.S. Senate Race

Oct 3, 2016
Credit: NHPR

We discuss one of the mostly closely watched races of this election season, between Democratic Governor Maggie Hassan and incumbent Republican Kelly Ayotte, for U.S. Senate. We follow up on their debate Monday night, and go in-depth on some of the major national, and local issues, drawing attention in this race. 

Heading South: Bird Migration and Human Impact

Sep 30, 2016
Kelly Colgan Azar,

It's not uncommon at this time of year to look up and see the familiar shape of geese migrating south, or the broad wings of raptors riding the wind currents.  We discuss the different species of birds, including songbirds, who make an annual migration, and how they equip themselves for their journey. We also examine how humans have influenced the abundance of the species, and what we can do to help lessen our impact here on the ground in New Hampshire.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - September 30, 2016

Sep 30, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We check in on both presidential candidate visits to the Granite State, and discuss decisions on two major court cases, along with other news around the state this week.

Sky Guys: A Fall Astronomical Update

Sep 28, 2016

Our Sky Guys are back to help digest the events of a wild few weeks in space science, including NASA's announcement of explosive plumes of icy water on Jupiter's moon Europa.  The explosion of a SpaceX rocket snarls outer-orbit transportation schedules and yet, SpaceX  founder Elon Musk unveils a plan to get humans to Mars within a decade.   And a Kickstarter campaign aims to re-issue Carl Sagan's 1977  Golden Record in an effort to communicate with life outside our solar system.

Credit: Paul Levy

We speak with New Hampshire author Paul Levy about his new book called Finding Phil: Lost in War and Silence. Levy describes his search to uncover the life, and death, of an uncle he never knew, who died in World War II. 


Paul Levy - Retired poverty lawyer and professor who taught at Indiana University and Smith College, before serving on the faculty of a progressive adult learning program at Springfield College. 



We kick off our 2016 "Conversations with the Candidates" series with Governor Maggie Hassan, the Democratic U.S. Senate nominee. Hassan's race against incumbent Senator Kelly Ayotte is one of the most highly-watched in the nation. We ask the Governor about the big issues at stake: from national security to gun laws to money in politics. 

Sustainable or Green-washing?

Sep 23, 2016

Many companies these days take pride in reducing their environmental impact, from composting to using lighter packaging.  And it's a selling point, as more consumers favor environmentally conscious firms. Some businesses, however, are accused of green-washing -- promoting an image that has little to do with reality.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - September 23, 2016

Sep 23, 2016

The race for Governor is in full effect as Republican Chris Sununu and Democrat Colin van Ostern meet in their first debate.  Staffing problems raise fresh concerns over how the state protects its most vulnerable at New Hampshire Hospital and the Department of Child and Family Services.  And the industry dear to the Granite State  loses its last locally-owned quarry. 

The candidates for New Hampshire governor faced questions around economic issues, addressed issues including energy prices, health care costs, and the Granite State tax structure.  

Pet Economics: The Dollars & Cents of Pet Ownership

Sep 21, 2016
FLICKR/CC Army Medicine

We're closer to our domesticated creatures than at any point in human history -- even considering them family members. Yet the cost of owning pets can be daunting, as veterinary medicine has advanced to include expensive specialties and treatment.  And then there's doggy day care and all manner of niceties for animals, including dog-carrying backpacks and music specially composed for cats.  So, how far should we go to take care of our pets? 

Why N.H. Roadways Are Becoming Deadlier

Sep 20, 2016
digitizedchaos / flickr/cc

After decades of improved safety on our roadways, the trend seems to be reversing, with major increases in fatalities around the country and in New Hampshire.  We look at the reasons for the dramatic uptick in traffic deaths, including distracted drivers and cheap gas.  

This program was originally heard on Aug. 31, 2016.

Self-Driving Cars: Closer Than You Think

Sep 19, 2016

The future is now.  In several cities, companies from Ford to Tesla are racing to develop their own automated driving machines.  We discuss the innovations and challenges of self-driving cars, and ask what it will take to make you comfortable in the passenger seat?

Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc


Breaking up is hard to do. But in New Hampshire, multi-town school districts and administrative units (SAUs) are doing just that. Some say the process should be made easier, particularly for cooperative districts that were designed to discourage dissolution. But others warn of unintended consequences for students.  

School enrollment throughout New England has been declining, a demographic change that has prompted Maine and Vermont to encourage districts and towns to combine schools and resources to save money and provide educational opportunities for students.