The Exchange

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. NHPR listeners have a daily forum to discuss important issues and speak directly with elected officials.

Click here to get our podcast on iTunes, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to get an email when we publish a new episode? Click to subscribe.

Call in during the show: 800.892.6477

Next week on The Exchange:

Monday, 10/5: Sky Guys - Astronomy Update

Tuesday, 10/6: Affordable Housing

Wednesday, 10/7: Political Junkie Ken Rudin

Thursday, 10/8: Senator Lindsay Graham

Friday, 10/9: Friday N.H. News Roundup

Ryan Farrar / Flickr/CC

We're checking in with the Sky Guys this week about the latest news about water on Mars, extrasolar planets, and this month's lunar eclipse.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - October 2, 2015

Oct 2, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the new New Hampshire news stories of the week.


  • Garry Rayno - Statehouse reporter for the New Hampshire Union Leader and Sunday News
  • Dean Spiliotes - civic scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at SNHU, an author of the website
  • Paul Steinhauser - political director and anchor for NH1 News
rania effa / Flickr/CC

We’re sitting down with Karima Bennoune, international human rights rights, lawyer, and writer. Her recent book tells the stories Muslim educators, lawyers, artists, and writers who she says represent one of the best hopes for ending fundamentalist oppression worldwide.


School Start Times & The Science of Adolescent Sleep

Sep 30, 2015
Tom Woodward / Flickr/CC

We’re taking a look at the debate over early school start times and the science of adolescent sleep needs.


Andree Reno Sanborn / Flickr/CC

We’re sitting down with author Jay Atkinson to talk about his new book, ‘Massacre on the Merrimack’ - which takes on the Hannah Duston story.


Fines & Incarceration in N.H.

Sep 28, 2015
Peter Stinson / Flickr/CC

A new New Hampshire ACLU report says that too many Granite Staters go to jail because they can't afford to pay court fines. We're looking at how this system works and whether it needs to change.


Friday N.H. News Roundup - September 25, 2015

Sep 25, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're talking about the top New Hampshire news stories of the week.

  • Josh Rogers – NHPR’s senior political reporter
  • Kathleen Ronayne – New Hampshire Statehouse reporter for the AP
  • Trent Spiner – executive editor for the Union Leaders and New Hampshire Sunday News

Awaiting N.H.'s Medical Marijuana Program

Sep 24, 2015
Brett Levin / Flickr/CC

The therapeutic use of cannabis has been legal  for about two years now, but the process of establishing cultivation centers, dispensaries, and ID cards is still underway. While many praise the state for its careful approach, others suffering from conditions they hope to treat with the drug are becoming impatient. 


Alexander Sun / Flickr/CC

College Scorecard (9:00):

Two years ago, President Obama announced plans for rating colleges and universities, so students would know whether they were getting a good value.  Now, the administration has released its College Scorecard, and students and families are deciding how best to use it.

Patrick / Flickr/CC

The number of homeschooling families in New Hampshire and nationwide continues to grow, and they’re more diverse: including families with a wider range of political, religious, and educational approaches. But even as this group expands, it is less regulated by the states, sparking debate on how much oversight is needed. 


Papist / Flickr/CC

Since his selection, there’s been intense interest in Pope Francis’s leadership, among Catholics and non-Catholics.  And that interest is growing, as he now heads to the U.S. with a packed schedule that includes an unprecedented Congressional address….and a tendency to tackle politically charged issues, from capitalism to climate change.  


Friday N.H. News Roundup - September 18, 2015

Sep 18, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top stories of the week: after months of stalemate, lawmakers hammer out a compromise budget agreement and the Governor signs it into law. A leading New Hampshire business group names affordable housing as the biggest challenge facing employers. And an emu on the loose in Bow evades capture while captivating public attention.


Top N.H. Lawmakers Discuss Bipartisan Budget Deal

Sep 17, 2015

After months of stalemate, top lawmakers and the Governor crafted a compromise that splits the difference on the contested issue of business tax cuts.  We’re talking with Statehouse leaders about this hard-won deal, how rank-and-file members reacted, and what might be next.  


PeterHDK / Flickr/CC

In his new book, Josh Levs says many dads today want to engage with their families, but old office stereotypes prevail, with corporate policies standing in the way.  He says that hurts not only fathers, but families and businesses as well.



Syrian Refugee Crisis: N.H. Reacts

Sep 15, 2015
DFID - UK Department for International Development / Flickr/CC

As migrants from Syria and other countries pour into Europe, President Obama says the United States will take ten thousand. And so Americans are watching and considering our own capacity to take in refugees, and other ways to address the root problems that are driving so many people out their home countries.


matt2181 / Flickr/CC

This primary season, much of the attention has focused on the Republican side, given the many candidates and another upcoming debate.  But this weekend in New Hampshire, it’s the Democrats’ turn: at their annual state convention, the party’s presidential contenders are all expected.  We’ll look at the candidates and the issues.


Friday N.H. News Roundup - September 11, 2015

Sep 11, 2015

We're looking at the top news stories of the week: Executive Councilor Chris Sununu declares his intention to run for governor, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders continues to pull ahead of Hillary Clinton in state polls, and the city of Franklin reinstates a curfew for kids under 16.


  • Dan Barrick
  • Garry Rayno
  • Dean Spiliotes
NHPR / Michael Brindley

On Sept. 11, 2001, The Exchange held a special call-in program in the afternoon. Laura Knoy hosted and was joined by Jon Greenberg. Former 2nd District Congressman Charlie Bass called into the program, saying, "This is the event we feared the most." We've pulled the audio from our archives.

aciamax / Flickr/CC

After this summer’s rape trial ended in conviction of a former St. Paul’s student on several counts, many educators and parents are taking stock of teachable moments: do teenagers understand the concept of consent, how does media influence their thinking, how can they protect themselves and others. We’ll look at how well we prepare our youth for these situations.


Vaping360 / Flickr/CC

Despite claims by the industry that e-cigarettes are healthier than traditional smoking, more research is raising questions about this alternative, including its rising use by teenagers. But vaping has caught on, with more shops opening and many ex-smokers who say vaping helped them quit tobacco.


Cities and Counties Take Action on Minimum Wage

Sep 8, 2015
Pyogenes Gruffer / Flickr/CC

Recently, cities and counties have taken the lead on mandating much higher pay for traditional low-wage jobs, instead of waiting for the states or the federal government.  Supporters say these increases are long overdue and only fair, but others warn of unintended consequences, including job losses and cutbacks in hours.


Army Medicine / Flickr CC

Whether they have insurance or not, many Americans have trouble affording dental care. This leaves many adults -and children- forgoing needed dental care that leads to bigger health problems down the road. But  medical research and many doctors are promoting the idea that insurance for oral health should not be separated from general health insurance, setting the stage for potential reforms to the way we treat the health of our teeth.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - September 4, 2015

Sep 4, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top stories of the week:  a legal battle heats up over the release of police body-camera footage of a fatal shooting, the state’s sex offender laws come under scrutiny following the verdict in the St. Paul’s rape trial, and the Northern Pass debate comes to central New Hampshire, with Concord residents asking why more lines can’t be buried. 

woodfin / Flickr/CC

The New Hampshire presidential primary celebrates its 100th birthday next year, and a new book chronicles those many decades, including lots of primary lore. It also examines whether the first primary really has as much power over the nomination process as many believe it to.


iprimages / Flickr/CC

While Donald Trump continues to dominate on the GOP side of the presidential primary race, Carly Fiorina and Ben Carson make substantial gains in Iowa. Meanwhile, Democratic front-runner Hilary Clinton appears to lose her stride, with more liberals around the country ‘feeling the Bern.’ And President Obama heads to Alaska to talk climate change. 


Josh Rogers / NHPR

Since appointed by Governor Hassan to lead the fight against an epidemic of heroin and opioid abuse, Wozmak has faced some political pushback and a budget impasse. We’ll talk with him about that and hear his plan for marshaling the state’s resources to tackle drug abuse and overdose deaths.


  • Jack Wozmak – New Hampshire’s senior director of Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health for the Governor’s Office, also known as the state’s ‘drug czar.’

We’re talking with Arthur Brooks, prominent conservative and president of the American Enterprise Institute. In his new book, he says that conservatism has for too long been a movement of the head instead of the heart. The book also includes his blueprint for a more prosperous America, and his social justice agenda for what he calls the New Right.


  • Arthur Brooks – president of the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C.
Tiger Pixel / Flickr / Creative Commons

What began as a pet project for computer programmers and digital-privacy activists is today a financial technology worth billions of dollars. Author Nathaniel Popper takes us behind the scenes of that dramatic transformation and looks ahead at how this digital currency could shape the global economy of the future.

Andreas Levers / Flickr/cc

Roughly seventeen million Americans suffer from alcoholism, making it the country’s most prevalent addiction. We’ll look at efforts in New Hampshire to address this. Plus, we’ll hear from critics and supporters of the most commonly prescribed approach to treating the disease, Alcoholics Anonymous.

Elizabeth / Flickr/CC

After allowing their six and ten year old children to walk a mile home by themselves, a Maryland couple are fighting accusations of child neglect. The case has inflamed a familiar argument over how much supervision and independence children need. We’ll look behind the clichés and get the range of views on free-range parenting.