The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

Vote for the year's top shows:

What were the best Exchange episodes of 2017? We're letting listeners decide, and we'll replay the top five during our holiday break. Click here to rate your favorite shows.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy. Click here to get our podcast on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

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Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 12/11 -  Books to Give (and Get) For the Holidays

Tuesday, 12/12 - The Connection Between Substance Abuse, Mental Illness, and Suicide

Wednesday, 12/13 - NAFTA

Thursday, 12/14 - Single-Payer Insurance

Friday, 12/15 -  Weekly N.H. News Roundup

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: November 3, 2017

Nov 3, 2017

The state Attorney General's office launches a criminal investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct involving three Dartmouth College professors.  A report regarding sexual abuse by faculty and staff at St. Paul’s School contains new allegations against five individuals.  And residents struggle to recover from the fourth-largest power outage in state history.

Incumbent Mayor Ted Gatsas and challenger Joyce Craig, a former Alderman, square off days before voters go to the polls. On the agenda: the opioid crisis, education, property taxes, and immigration. It's the second time the two have vied for the corner office of the state's largest city.


Mark Colomb; Wikimedia Commons

A recent anonymous $3 million donation to help pregnant women and their babies fight addiction highlights the challenges, and costs, of caring for this population. Mothers and their newborns face specific hurdles when it comes to addiction, and hospitals and care centers have struggled to adapt to meet those needs.  


Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas and his Democratic challenger, former Alderman Joyce Craig, will join NHPR's Laura Knoy for a live debate on The Exchange.

The program will air live on Thursday, November 2nd at 9 a.m., and will also be broadcast via live video stream on Facebook. (You can watch that right here.)

The debate will focus on issues including the opioid crisis, education, property taxes, and Manchester's business climate.

John F. Williams; Wikimedia Commons

Manufacturing jobs require more training in technology, mathematics, and problem-solving, and schools and businesses seek ways to retrain workers and prepare the incoming workforce. 

GUESTS:

Via pixabay

With explosive stories coming out of Hollywood and other industries, we look at this issue in New Hampshire: how workplace harassment is defined, in what settings it occurs, why it continues despite widespread awareness, and what role the legal system and human resource departments play.   


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 27, 2017

Oct 27, 2017

N.H. officials are among those at the White House for President Trump's announcement that he will declare the opioid crisis a public health emergency.  New data show that New Hampshire's public colleges have the highest cost for in-state students anywhere in the country.  A task force looking at the future of the Manchester VA loses a controversial co-chair.  And Bernie Sanders rallies Granite State Democrats.


Could It Happen Here? Fighting Forest Fires in N.H.

Oct 25, 2017
KEN WATSON / KENWATSON.NET

While Western blazes are common, wildfires in California this year have been especially devastating.  Meanwhile, New Hampshire has been battling a persistent forest fire this fall, on the Dilly Cliffs near the Lost River Gorge area of Woodstock. We examine how often we see forest fires in New Hampshire, and the effects of drought and future climate change. We also discuss how  local, state and federal agencies approach fire-fighting and forest ecosystems. 

Image: Carnegie Institution for Science

Gravitational waves from two colliding neutron stars 130 million million light-years away were detected recently, and this cosmic event has sparked an astronomy revolution. The Sky  Crew returns to explain what the cosmic tells us about how heavy elements like gold, platinum and uranium were formed,  and what it means for the future of astronomy.  We check in on how NASA is improving the odds of identifying habitable exoplanets, plus another discovery, a "quasi-satellite." And we look at a Planet Nine conspiracy theory!


The U.S. Supreme Court Cases To Watch This Fall

Oct 23, 2017
John Marino; Flickr

A new term at the U.S. Supreme Court opens with some long-standing debates.  The high court began its legal season on October 1st. Major issues include the drawing of political boundaries, called gerrymandering. Other cases address issues of digital privacy and religious freedom. 

NPR has a comprehensive discussion of many of these cases, found here


A recent nationwide survey of supervisors finds that many businesses are not taking full advantage of resources available to train and employ those with disabilities. We'll look at the results of this survey, employment trends for adults with disabilities both nationally and in New Hampshire, and how employers can (and why they should) take advantage of this workforce. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 20, 2017

Oct 20, 2017

The Granite State makes a pitch for Amazon "H.Q. Two," and the governor reverses course on commuter rail. And why the no-show for Keno?  Hearings on the electronic bingo game Keno are noticeably empty.  We also talk about how the opioid crisis is affecting the Manchester mayoral race.

Sara Plourde

We talk to NHPR reporter Paige Sutherland about two topics in her series, "Alternatives - N.H. Gets Creative to Curb Ongoing Opioid Crisis": an acupuncture detoxification treatment and involuntary commitment. 


Art Gallery ErgsArt via Flickr/CC

500 years ago this month, the German monk Martin Luther delivered his 95 theses to an Archbishop of the Holy Roman Empire, and the Reformation was born.  Among Luther's complaints about the Catholic Church: the practice of granting indulgences in exchange for good works or acts of piety.  Although he didn't intend to cause a religious revolution, Luther  would become a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation, inspiring a schism in Christianity that resonates to this day. 


NHPR Flickr

We preview New Hampshire's mid-term elections.  While actual voting is a year away, a crowd of potential candidates is already weighing the possibilities.  That's especially true in the First Congressional District: with an open seat and a reputation for being unpredictable.  We find out more - also, an update on how President Trump's health care order may affect New Hampshire. 

GUESTS:

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 13, 2017

Oct 13, 2017

Gov. Sununu nominates House Speaker Shawn Jasper to be the next Commissioner of Agriculture. Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter announces she won't run for re-election, and speculation begins on who might run for the first congressional district seat. State health official say residents on public water in Merrimack and Bedford have been exposed to toxic chemicals. And the state and EPA differ on the risks posed by a superfund site in North Hampton. 


Michael Saechang via Flickr/CC

After the Las Vegas massacre, the debate over guns is back, in Congress and in the Granite State. At one point soon after the shooting, it seemed there might be a narrow area of agreement:  banning or regulating a device called a "bump-stock" that accelerated gunfire in the most recent mass shooting.  Still, as our conversation made plain, vast differences of opinion remain, and common ground may be fast disappearing. 


Boston commuter cities like Nashua are jumping on the chance to develop a private passenger rail, after years of unsuccessful campaigning for a public rail system. New Hampshire's zoning ordinances and city planning processes are drawing criticism for their contribution to the current over-priced housing market. And millennials get their own commission to help the state appeal to a younger population. 


Paige Sutherland for NHPR

New Hampshire is the Granite State...we like our landscapes and our people to be tough. But New Hampshire is also known for its beauty, our forests and mountains. Our trails, fields, and cold-water coastline.

What this state isn’t known for are its islands. But today, we’re changing that.

With the end of summer rapidly approaching we're dedicating this episode of The Exchange entirely to the islands of New Hampshire. We’ve got stories from the Seacoast and the Lakes Region to the North Country. Stories of camps, boats, warring lobstermen, and inescapable beauty.

This show originally aired in September, 2017. 

Listen to the episode:


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 6, 2017

Oct 5, 2017

Sen. Maggie Hassan announced she is helping to introduce legislation designed to prevent modifications that allow for the rapid fire of semi-automatic weapons. One of the Manchester VA whistleblowers has announced he will challenge Democrat Annie Kuster in New Hampshire's second district as a Republican. And Granite Staters fill more than 20 trucks with supplies for Puerto Rico, thanks to a N.H. state house drive that exceeded expectations.


The fall foliage season is sweeping through New Hampshire, causing residents and leaf-peepers to appreciate anew the forests in the state.  The colors of the season are a function of forest health, and we look closely at efforts to restore and protect three iconic tree species: elm, ash, and chestnut.  And a new report finds that New England is losing 65 acres of forestland per day


Franchise Opportunities; Flickr

After the Graham-Cassidy Bill proposed by Republicans -- their latest Repeal and Replace effort -- failed to garner enough votes recently, patients, healthcare providers, and insurers still face plenty of uncertainty before open enrollment begins November 1. Meanwhile, Senator Bernie Sanders's single-payer proposal continues to gain fans. We'll get the latest on how national politics is shaping the health care debate across the country.  

GUEST:

Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas and former alderman Joyce Craig will take part in a debate hosted by NHPR’s The Exchange.

The debate will air live Thursday, Nov. 2 at 9 a.m. It will be rebroadcast at 7 p.m. later that evening. Laura Knoy, host of The Exchange, will moderate.

The Nov. 7 election will be a rematch of 2015, when Gatsas defeated Craig by just 64 votes.

Gatsas is seeking his fifth term as mayor of New Hampshire’s largest city. A Republican, Gatsas ran for governor last year, but fell short in the GOP primary.

The Las Vegas Shooting: Granite Staters Respond

Oct 2, 2017
Ken Lund, Flickr

It's been called the worst mass shooting in modern American history.  On Sunday evening, a gunman opened fire on an outdoor concert festival  in Las Vegas, killing at least 58 people and injuring many more. Some of the stories surrounding the massacre are eerily familiar: Family members of the gunman express shock upon hearing about the attack; victims describe feelings of disbelief as scenes of mayhem and horror engulfed them.   Yet this attack also surpassed others in terms of numbers killed and injured.  We'll take your questions and comments as details of this latest mass shooting continue to emerge. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 29, 2017

Sep 30, 2017

 

Risk, Decisions, and Death in the Presidentials

Sep 28, 2017
(Photo Matty Bowman)

N.H.'s beautiful Presidential Range attracts hikers in all seasons. Mt. Washington holds the dubious distinction of having “the world’s worst weather” yet hikers and climbers are attracted year-round to the challenging terrain.  It's also been the scene of  hundreds of accidents, including the one that took the life of Kate Matrosova in 2015.  We examine Matrosova's story and the lessons learned about risk-taking and decision-making.


Repetitive hits, which do not cause concussion symptoms, may be causing long term harm in athletes who participate in contact sports up to the age of 12, according to a new study from Boston University's Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Center.

What's The Story Behind New Hampshire's Stone Walls?

Sep 26, 2017
Edith W. Currier

Robert Frost famously said “good fences make good neighbors” and if you’re out for a walk in the woods in New Hampshire, you will likely find a stone wall.  We talk with Kevin Gardner, a master stone builder and author of several books on the subject, about the on-going appeal of stone walls and how to build them.  He explains the philosophy behind the craft of placing stone and examines the mythology of the stone wall and its place in the New England imagination.

Credit Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

New Hampshire schools and communities have been doing some serious soul searching after reports of racist incidents in which children were allegedly harassed verbally and physically, resulting in neck injuries for one boy.

Right now, many are in response mode.

What are the best strategies in school settings for addressing racial tension or preventing it from happening in the first place? 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 22, 2017

Sep 22, 2017

The Graham-Cassidy healthcare proposal receives mixed response in the Granite State. Community college officials are grilled by New Hampshire lawmakers concerned about a recent audit.  And V.A. whistle blowers raise concerns about continued problems at the facility.


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