The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show, hosted by Laura Knoy.  It airs live at 9 AM and rebroadcasts at 7 PM weekdays.

The Exchange is Going Local!

Submit your questions about the regions of New Hampshire for our Going Local series, which you can hear every Thursday starting on July 12th. 

You can ask about where you live, or any other region you are curious about. For example: What are the biggest employers in the Great North Woods? How much does it cost to live on the Seacoast? What fun things can I do in the Monadnock region?

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Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 7/16 - Call Me American by Abdi Nor Iftin

Tuesday, 7/17 -  Telemedicine

Wednesday, 7/18 - Summer Movies: A Midsummer Check-in 

Thursday, 7/19 - Going Local: The Seacoast Region

Friday, 7/20 -  Weekly N.H. News Roundup

Want to call in during the show or leave us a message? Here's the number: 800.892.6477 

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweetfollowing us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

If you can't listen to the live show or don't live in our broadcast area, you can listen to our show online (just open the day's show post below) or subscribe to our podcast. Click here to get it on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher. (Don't know how to find and listen to podcasts? Click here for a handy guide created by our friends at VPR!)

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Since moving into the state in 2013, the invasive Emerald Ash Borer has been diminishing local ash tree poplations. Now, New Hampshire's forrests face a threat from another non-native insect: The Southern Pine Beetle. On Monday, June 18, the Exchange discusses the these two wood-boring beetles and their impact on New Hampshire, how they got here, and what we can do to fight back.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 15, 2018

Jun 15, 2018

The state parole board wrestles with public access to hearings.  A V.A. task force issues recommendations for improving N.H. veterans' health care.  And several property-poor districts consider suing the state over its education-funding mechanism.     

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Several high-profile suicides have been the focus of a national conversation, and recent numbers show that the rate in New Hampshire is up nearly 50 percent over the past 20 years. The Exchange on Thursday, June 14, will examine what's causing this rise in suicide deaths, and how N.H. is approaching this difficult topic. 

Mental health professionals urge people suffering from suicidal thoughts to seek help by contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, which is available 24 hours a day at (800) 273-8255.

GUESTS:

  • Todd Donovan -   Firefighter and paramedic for the Derry Fire Department and Data Specialist for the Division of Fire Standards and Training and Emergency Medical Services. He has survived several suicide attempts and experienced lifelong depression before receiving treatment as an adult that helped alleviate his illness. He shares his story with first responders and other groups to help spread awareness about treatment and to help prevent suicide. 
  • Ken Norton - Executive Director of  NAMI-NH.  He serves on the steering committee for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and on the N.H. Suicide Prevention Council. He also led devlopment of NAMI- NH's Connect Program,  a national best practice approach to training professionals and communities on suicide prevention and response. 
  • Jennifer Schirmer -  Disaster Behavioral Health Coordinator with N.H. Department of Health and Human Services. She is a licensed mental health counselor and oversees statewide efforts to help those affected by suicide. 

On Thursday, June 14, we're discussing suicide in New Hampshire and efforts underway to prevent it.

Suicide rates were up 48.3 percent from 1999 - 2016 in the Granite State, according to a recent report from the CDC.  We'll examine what might be contributing to this, as well as the latest thinking on how to discuss and prevent suicide.  Submit your questions below. 

Mental health professionals urge people suffering from suicidal thoughts to seek help by contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, which is available 24 hours a day at (800) 273-8255.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

New Hampshire Department of Corrections Commissioner Helen Hanks says only patients whose mental illness drives them to extreme violence end up in the state prison’s secure psychiatric unit, and it’s a small group -- on average occupying about 10 of the unit’s 66 beds every year.  

DCist Photos

How are tariffs and international trade disputes impacting our state? We also take a look at summer employment, including the shortage of workers. And, how do large companies mergers impact the little guys?

NHPR File Photo

It's been called one of the toughest jobs in the state: Commissioner of the Department of Corrections. Since last November, Helen Hanks has held the position, overseeing three prisons, probation offices, and transitional housing units.  Also on her watch:  The opening of a new women's prison after a long legal battle over equal treatment for female prisoners, and protests over the practice of housing non-criminal patients in the state prison's secure psychiatric unit.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, The Exchange talks with Maura Sullivan, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Sullivan is a Marine who was born in Illinois and moved to New Hampshire after serving as Assistant Secretary at the Department of Veterans Affairs, among other postings, for the Obama administration. 

NH DHHS

New Hampshire residents have long known the risks of contracting diseases like Lyme and West Nile from a tick or mosquito bite, but a recent report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there’s even more to worry about.

The CDC is now tracking 16 of these “vector-borne diseases” and says the number of cases has tripled between 2004 and 2016.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 8, 2018

Jun 7, 2018

We look at the public feud between the largest state employees union and the top managers of the New Hampshire Liquor Commission.  Are state liquor store employees at risk in high-volume cash sales?  Lakes Region residents consider possible future plans for the former Laconia State School.   And what to do with the troublesome bear pardoned by Governor Sununu last year, now rummaging again in backyards in the Upper Valley.

GUESTS:

New research shows that illnesses carried by ticks and mosquitos are on the rise. We talk about why these creatures are carrying more disease, and what you need to know about illnesses such as Lyme, babesiosis, and Zika.

 

The NFL Kneeling Ban And The First Amendment

Jun 6, 2018
By Keith Allison from Hanover, MD / Wikimedia Commons

The National Football League recently announced a new policy requiring players to stand during the national anthem or stay in the locker room. Earlier this week, President Donald Trump called off a visit by the Philadelphia Eagles to the White House, citing the dispute over the NFL kneeling ban. We check out issues of constitutionality and find out how players and owners are reacting. 

GUESTS:

Annie Roepik/NHPR

Neighbors at the Coakley Landfill Superfund site in Greenland met privately with top EPA officials on Monday to discuss a long-standing concern: high levels of potentially toxic PFAS chemicals in a brook that runs alongside the landfill. 

Local residents handed New England EPA Administrator Alexandra Dunn a petition asking the agency to compell the group responnsible for the site's contamination to take several actions, including expanding testing of residential wells and installing water filters at homes and schools around the landfill. 

We get an update on the Coakley site, as well as other areas dealing with drinking-water contamination, from NHPR's Energy and Environment reporter Annie Ropeik. 

NHPR File Photo

The opioid crisis has forced physicians to rethink their prescribing practices, and many are providing fewer opioid prescriptions, potentially leaving some patients without proper pain management.

Tighter regulations and insurance requirements have reduced overprescribing, but many say this makes it difficult for patients with both acute and chronic pain to find the help they need.

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A recent study found that New Hampshire reduced opioid prescriptions by 15% last year, the largest drop in the country.  How have physicians changed how they prescribe opiods in acute, and chronic care settings?

Stuart Meek; Wikimedia Commons

On Thursday, June 7th, we will take a look at the rise in insect-borne illnesses, and how environmental and human factors are influencing insect populations. What is causing the increase in disease, and what can we do about it? We'll talk about diseases from mosquitoes and ticks such as Lyme, dengue, Zika, and babeosis. Submit your questions below. 

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What is CRISPR?

Jun 2, 2018
OHSU

CRISPR stands for "Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats".  It allows scientists to precisely target and cut any kind of genetic material, including in humans.  This gene editing tool has given hope for treating diseases like cancer, muscular dystrophy, and ALS.  Gene-editing breakthroughs are also raising ethical questions, however, and we look at possible future applications for the technique.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, Laura talks with Chris Pappas, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Pappas is the owner of the Puritan Backroom Restaurant, a restaurant in Manchester, and is a member of the N.H. Executive Council. He was formerly a state representative, and Treasurer of Hillsborough County. 

Our Race for the First conversations will focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 1, 2018

Jun 1, 2018

We find out why the A.C.L.U. of N.H. is challenging the voting law, HB1264, that is before the N.H. Supreme Court. After exhaustive investigations, New Hampshire's Ballot Law Commission determines no voter took place in recent elections and has an explanation for claims of "busloads" of out-of-state voters.  A border patrol roadblock on I-93 over Memorial Day weekend nets seventeen immigration violations and the A.C.L.U. has questions.  And keep your free-range chicken in your own yard or face a fine.

Samantha Brady/AVSAR

With pleasant weather comes a busy hiking season in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. A misread map, a sudden storm, a forgotten headlamp - and suddenly a hike could turn into a matter of survival. We look at a new book, "Critical Hours," that offers a history and a celebration of the search and rescue workers and volunteers who save lives in the White Mountains.  The growth of inexpensive but sophisticated navigation devices and mobile phones have become part of the experience for both hikers and rescuers. We examine the impact of ubiquitous technology and the future of search and rescue operations.

U.S Air Force

Red flag laws allow family members or law enforcement to petition to get taken guns away from potential mass-shooters.  A handful of states have these laws, including Vermont, but more are considering this approach.  Still, they raise lots of questions: who decides that someone poses a threat, and do these laws make a difference?  

We kick off the summer season with NHPR's Outside/In.  First, sharing the road between bikes and cars, and one cyclists's war against bike lanes.  Then, an american lobster in Stockholm. Is Scandinavia is in the midst of a foreign lobster invasion?

For Memorial Day, we revisit our earlier conversation about "Ninety Percent Mental" - that's what Yogi Berra said about baseball, and it's also the title of former Major League pitcher Bob Tewksbury's new book.  After years in "the show" Tewksbury is now part of the growing trend in baseball focusing on psychological strategies to maximize performance.  Yogi Berra's quote continued with "the other half is physical" and Tewksbury will also reminisce about some of the game-changing characters from his time on the mound. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 25, 2018

May 25, 2018

We dig into the results of the legislative session as it winds up, and tally up Governor Sununu's wins and losses.  Eversource gets permission to invest in gas pipelines to supply electricity - NHPR's Annie Ropeik considers ramifications for future efforts to revive Northern Pass. And the town of Hampstead decides to cut back on homework.  NHPR's political reporter Lauren Chooljian will be in for her first stint as substitute host.  

NHPR

Our series on mental health in New Hampshire concludes with a look at the role of the state psychiatric hospital in responding to crises, and at what happens once a patient leaves, including what's available in terms of treatment, jobs, housing, and community support. 

The Exchange

The Exchange: In-Depth:  It's only in recent years that New Hampshire has begun to seriously address the mental health needs of children. Under a 2016 law, the state is supposed to provide a more coordinated system to help children with mental health needs that have been intensified by the opioid crisis and a troubled DCYF system. Suicide remains a top cause of death for N.H. teens.

Schools are now playing a major role in helping to identify problems -- using "trauma-informed" techniques to help children cope with psychological stress and challenges that can interfere with academics and learning.   

NHPR

The Exchange: In-Depth

Our series continues with a  look at the criminal justice system.  Many incarcerated Americans are behind bars due to some form of mental illness, and in recent years, the courts and police have been trying to adapt. We're examining the complex intersection between the mental health and legal systems. 

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In the first of our four-day In-Depth series, The Exchange explored whether mental health care in New Hampshire has improved since the state agreed to invest more in the system  — part of a 2014 legal settlement. All agreed there's been progress. There's more help for people in crisis and more transitional housing.

But there's still plenty of room for improvement, including on permanent-housing arrrangements and reimbursement rates for struggling community mental health centers.  

In Depth: Mental Health Care For N.H.'s Children

May 21, 2018
Creative Commons Zero - CCO

The Exchange: In-Depth. Our series continues with a focus on children. Research shows many cases of mental illness begin by age 14 and that addressing trauma early can help prevent some disorders. Meanwhile, the state is required by law to provide better care for youth. We'll find out how the system is working from teachers, providers, and parents.  

In Depth: Examining N.H.'s Mental Health System

May 18, 2018
PublicDomainPictures.net

The Exchange: In-Depth

On the first of our four-day series, we get an overview of mental health care in New Hampshire, including efforts to bolster the community support system, as required under a 2013 legal settlement.  We'll also find out how a new 10-year plan for mental health is shaping up, and how it differs from the last 10-year plan.  Among the issues yet to be solved: long emergency-room waits for people in crisis, an average of 37 people daily, according to the N.H. chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. 

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