The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show, hosted by Laura Knoy.  It airs live at 9 AM and rebroadcast at 7 PM weekdays.

Want to call in during the show? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

Want to leave us a message? Leave us a voicemail at 800.892.6477 at any other time, and we might use it on a future program.

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

If you can't listen to the live show or don't live in our broadcast area, you can listen to our show online (just open the day's show post below) or subscribe to our podcast. Click here to get it on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher. (Don't know how to find and listen to podcasts? Click here for a handy guide created by our friends at VPR!)

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Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 03/19 - Why Is It So Hard To Get A Professional License In N.H.?

Tuesday, 03/20 - The Self-Driven Child by William Stixrud and Ned Johnson 

Wednesday, 03/21 - Magical Drinking with Outside/In: Why People Choose to Drink Raw, Unfiltered Water 

Thursday, 03/22 - Current Use (9-9:40)/Presidential Candidate Preview (9:40-10)

Friday, 03/23 -  Weekly N.H. News Roundup

N.H. Medicaid Update

Feb 7, 2018

We learn the latest about new Medicaid guidelines released by the Trump Administration, in which states, including New Hampshire, will now be allowed to impose work requirements on some recipients of Medicaid. State lawmakers are currently debating whether to extend the Medicaid expansion program beyond the end of 2018, when it is due to sunset. 

A Check-Up On Medical Marijuana In New Hampshire

Feb 6, 2018

New Hampshire's program has been in place for several years now and appears to be gaining acceptance among patients and providers.  We find out who's using the system, who's providing the drug, and what questions remain -- including medical concerns, bureaucratic hurdles, and the possibility of federal intervention.  

One education bill, HB 1263, would increase accountability and oversight for home-schooling, an idea debated in other states this year, and sparking huge opposition at a recent hearing in New Hampshire.  The other bill, SB 193, concerns school choice, and whether families can access taxes raised for public education to finance an alternative. 

Stunning Upset for Northern Pass Project

Feb 1, 2018

With the Site Evaluation Committee" unanimous vote denying a permit for Eversource's controversial Northern Pass project, we discuss what prompted the decision, the ramifications for Eversource, as well other energy projects, and the historical context of the proposed 192-mile transmission line through the state.

Ellen Grimm/NHPR

New Hampshire "drug czar" David Mara discusses the state's efforts to address the on-going addiction crisis.  Is the Granite state spending enough to prevent and treat addiction?  What's the right balance between law enforcement and treatment?  And is there adequate oversight of the state's drug treatment infrastructure? We also look at lessons learned from the closure of Serenity Place, Manchester's addiction treatment center associated with the Safe Station program. 

Also, we hear from NHPR's Paige Sutherland on her extensive reporting on the opioid crisis in New Hampshire. 

President Trump's First State of the Union Address

Jan 30, 2018
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We take a look at the speech itself  -- the tone and the major topics, such as infrastructure, immigration, and national security.  

A Troubled Investigation Into The Manchester VA

Jan 30, 2018
Peter Biello

The Department of Veterans Affairs launched an investigation into allegations of substandard care at the Manchester VA last year, after whistleblowers from the hospital went to the Boston Globe's Spotlight team.

Now, a new report says that the investigation ignored many of the complaints leveled by the whistleblowers, and at least one physician who was accused of poor care has found a job working with veterans elsewhere. We talk with Peter Biello, reporter and host of All Things Considered for NHPR, about the latest. 

This segment will air live from 9:40 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Wednesday, January 31st, and again at 7:40 p.m. The audio will be available shortly after 10 a.m.

New Hampshire Considers Commuter Rail (Again)

Jan 29, 2018

Governor Sununu called commuter rail a "boondoggle" during his campaign, but is now supporting a $4 million feasibility study of passenger rail. This has heartened supporters, who say it's long past time for more robust service in New Hampshire. But opponents maintain there are still far better and less expensive ways to expand the state's transportation options. We take a fresh look at our longstanding train debate. 

Movies, politics, culture... and the Oscars.  We look at what this year's Academy Awards try to reflect about American society, and whether they do it well.  We also talk about other movies that were huge hits last year, even if they weren't considered "Oscar-worthy", and the films to look forward to in 2018.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 26, 2018

Jan 26, 2018

Massachusetts picks Northern Pass for major energy contract.  A financially troubled addiction treatment center in Manchester shuts its doors, and sends its services to other local health providers. The N.H.  legislature considers lowering the state's drinking age.  And a massive ice jam on the Piscataquog River causes concerns about Spring flooding.


wynan smith via Flickr/CC

It's been a year since an investigation of the state's Division of Children Youth And Families revealed an agency in crisis. At the time, officials and lawmakers promised a major overhaul, with new leadership, policies and funding. We check in on what progress has been made in protecting New Hampshire's children.

How Will Solar Tariffs Affect N.H.?

Jan 24, 2018
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What do New Hampshire business owners say about the Trump administration's new tax on imported solar panels?  The tariff starts at 30 percent and drops 5 percent in each of the next three years. It's not as severe as Trump could have imposed, and it’s meant to boost the American solar manufacturing industry.  

N.H. Debates: How Young Is Too Young To Get Married?

Jan 24, 2018
Robert Chealb via Flickr

How young is too young to get married and who decides?  The current legal age in New Hampshire is thirteen for girls and fourteen for boys.  Now, as the legislature debates several bills to change this, we examine the legal, cultural, and political issues involved. 

N.H. Flu Season Update

Jan 24, 2018

It is a bad flu season this year, we look at why, the history of the flu and its vaccine, and where you should get vaccinated.  

As overdoses and deaths continue, New Hampshire physicians are responding to criticism that they've overprescribed. Now, some patients with chronic pain find themselves cut off from access to medications, left without other treatment options, and feeling that the anti-opioid push has gone overboard.


Sam Evans-Brown, host of Outside/In, the NHPR podcast about the natural world and how we use it, discusses the podcast's latest series, Powerline. We hear about how the development of the world's fourth-largest hydropower producer, Hydro-Québec, impacted French Canadians, and the indigenous people of Québec...also, how this hydropower company is connected to a controversial power project in New Hampshire, Northern Pass.

This show originally aired on November 29, 2017. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 19, 2018

Jan 18, 2018

Governor Chris Sununu appears to open the door to commuter rail, supporting a study to explore whether it could work in New Hampshire.  A  bill to strengthen victims' rights makes its way through the legislature with bipartisan support.  And enthusiasm over a snowy owl ruffles feathers on the Seacoast.


There's an entire section of the bookstore devoted to child-rearing, but what's really behind the advice? We look at the sociology, psychology, research, and opinion included in those parenting manuals, and how to sort out what's useful and what isn't.

University of Chicago Press

How much should the U.S. be open to business with other countries, and how much should we protect our industries from foreign competition? This question has been at the heart of trade policy for centuries. Now, in his comprehensive new book, author Douglas Irwin gives historical context to our current trade debates.

U.S. Foreign Policy In Tumultuous Times

Jan 15, 2018
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The headlines involving North Korea, Russia and Iran have been alarming, including even the threat of nuclear war.  But fraught relations involving these countries go back decades. We examine that geopolitical history -- and try to untangle recent developments. 



Wayne Lesperance - Professor of political science and Dean of undergraduate programs at New England College.






With M.L.K. Day approaching, we look at a forthcoming book that traces the response to King's assassination -- both here and around the world. At the time of his murder, King was a polarizing figure; indeed, it took until the year 2000 for New Hampshire to recognize the slain civil rights leader with a federal holiday.  We talk with UNH professor Jason Sokol about his book and about how America's fraught racial past has shaped current race relations.

This show originally aired on January 4th, 2018. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 12, 2018

Jan 11, 2018
Allegra Boverman

It’s a special edition of the Weekly New Hampshire News Roundup - recorded in front of a live audience at The Barley House in Concord.  The legislature tackles a lengthy, snow-delayed slate of bills including marijuana legalization, family medical leave and a possible state department of veterans affairs. Plus a new transitional housing unit signals a new approach to mental health care in N.H.  

This show was taped Thursday, January 11, 2018.

The New Hampshire House has approved a bill, HB 628, which, if it becomes law, would make New Hampshire one of a handful of states to require employers to give time off for family care. The plan allows workers to opt in to a fund for up to twelve weeks of leave.  But it has some hurdles, as opponents worry about cost and sustainability. 


An aging workforce and stagnating wages continue to trouble the Granite State, but job growth in manufacturing and tech offers hope for revitalizing our economy.  We look at that and potential impacts of the new tax law on New Hampshire businesses and workers.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

We sit down with New Hampshire's two U.S. Senators, Maggie Hassan and Jeanne Shaheen in front of a live, studio audience Monday morning.

We'll be discussing such issues as the federal response to the opioid crisis; escalating nuclear tensions with North Korea; and a looming showdown over immigration issues and a long-term government spending bill.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 5, 2018

Jan 4, 2018

The term "bombogenesis" becomes familiar to N.H. residents as they dig out from the first major nor'easter of 2018.  The N.H. Senate approves a bill that would tighten voter eligibility requirements, and the House takes on state-funded scholarships for private school education.

A Granite State Take On The New Tax Law

Jan 2, 2018
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Untangling the new tax law -- and what it means for individuals of various incomes, charities, universities, and businesses, both large and small.  Although the doubling of the standard deduction has gotten lots of attention, there's plenty more in the law worth focusing on, including the personal and dependency exemption, and a deduction for owners of "pass-through" businesses. 

Meanwhile, although the earned-income tax credit remains largely unchanged under the new law and is widely considered to have lifted more people out of poverty than any other federal measure, according to the IRS, as many as 20% of low-income workers in New Hampshire do not claim the credit.    

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Monday on The Exchange, U.S. Senators Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan will sit down with Laura for a special town hall broadcast in front of a live studio audience.

Do you have questions or comments for the Senators? Send them our way by email at and we might include them in the discussion. 

Be sure to include your name, and the New Hampshire town in which you live along with your question.

New Hampshire Lawmakers Look Ahead To A New Year

Jan 1, 2018

We hear from State House and Senate leaders about their priorities for 2018.  Among them: Medicaid expansion, voting rules, water contamination, and school choice.

Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology

Dec 29, 2017

It's no accident many Americans are obsessed with their screens - whether it's social media, video games, or plain old email, they're designed to keep us playing, looking, and checking.  In his book, Irresistible, marketing professor Adam Alter say that we’re just beginning to understand the epidemic of behavioral addiction gripping society and lays out options we have to address the problem before it consumes us. 

This program was originally broadcast on April 3, 2017.