The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

Want to leave us a message? Call this number anytime: 202.649.0835

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 10/16 -  2018 Midterm Election Preview: Congressional Districts 1&2 and Governor

Tuesday, 10/17 - N.H. Vietnam Veterans Respond to Ken Burns' Documentary, "The Vietnam War"

Wednesday, 10/18 - The History of Protestant Reformation

Thursday, 10/19 - "Alternatives," A Series by NHPR about Creative Methods for Curbing the Opioid Crisis

Friday, 10/20 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup

E. Grimm

 A school bus driver shortage in New Hampshire, and nationally, is making it difficult for some kids to get to school. It's forced the Northwood district to struggle with the start of the school day, and the town of Wakefield to delay school for two weeks.  Then there's the question of when that first day should be: Governor Sununu set off a statewide debate recently, saying he thinks the first day of school should be after Labor Day - we examine that issue as well.   

 

U.S. Army Europe

A month after the attacks on Sept. 11, President Bush authorized strikes against Al Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.  Those limited attacks have since grown into an enormous commitment, amounting to thousands of American lives and billions of dollars. Meanwhile, President Trump recently renewed American involvement there, vowing victory. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 8, 2017

Sep 8, 2017

President Trump’s decision to end the DACA immigration policy could affect as many as one thousand people in New Hampshire.  ICE orders deportation for Indonesian immigrants in New Hampshire.  Manchester became the first community to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors - seeking to recoup money spent battling opioid addiction.  And Portsmouth says no to Keno, as Rochester puts it on the ballot. 


Keith Shields; NHPR

In light of the recent hurricanes slamming the Gulf Coast and Southeastern United States, The Exchange spoke with Perry Plummer, Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, Jonathan Winter, a Dartmouth professor who has studied increasing precipitation over the last two decades in New England, and two engineers, Jim Gallagher, who specializes in dams, and Fred McNeill, who works in wastewater treatment, about how well New Hampshire is prepared for major weather events. 

A new book by Concord native Benjamin Rachlin, Ghost of the Innocent Man, tells a story of wrongful conviction and exoneration. We learn about the saga of Willie Grimes, imprisoned for 24 years for a rape he did not commit, and his legal fight for freedom.  Rachlin says it's one of many similar cases in recent years, thanks to expanded use of DNA evidence.  

GUEST:  Benjamin Rachlin, author of Ghost of the Innocent Man

Benjamin Rachlin will discuss Ghost of the Innocent Man at Gibson's Bookstore in Concord on Thursday, Sept. 7 at 5:30 p.m.


Steve Hooper; The Keene Sentinal

Hurricane Harvey slammed the Gulf Coast last week, and it got us thinking: How ready is New Hampshire for major storms, hurricanes, and floods?

Perry Plummer, Director of the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management for the New Hampshire Department of Safety, says the state has plenty of work to do to ensure our infrastructure can handle the kind of extreme weather events that are becoming increasingly common.

"We know more water is coming; we’re going to get these types of rain storms," Plummer said on The Exchange. "Obviously, I don’t think we’ll get a Harvey in New Hampshire, but we are going to get 10 and 15 inches of rain, and that’s going to challenge our infrastructure. We need to rebuild our infrastructure to protect our residents, protect our critical infrastructure." 

Doctors Increasingly Seek a Cure for Burnout

Sep 5, 2017
Wall Boat via Flickr/CC

While the role of a physician has always been demanding - there's a spike now in doctors who say they're overwhelmed, and spending more time in front of computers than tending to patients. That's contributing to a burnout epidemic, leading to high turnover, early retirement, and greater malpractice risk. We'll find out how doctors in New Hampshire are coping. 


Economist and Harvard professor Mihir Desai uses philosophy, film, literature, and history to analyze finance as an institution built on morality and humanity. His book , The Wisdom of Finance, explores how the financial industry can be understood through culture, and how deeply finance impacts our personal lives. 

This show originally aired on July 25, 2017. 

A Week of Summer Favorites on The Exchange

Aug 30, 2017
woodleywonderworks / Flickr

As we enjoy the last days of summer and gear up for the school year, we bring you a week of summer favorites. We hear our earlier conversation about New Hampshire lakes, taking a deep dive into how policies are keeping Granite State lakes healthy and swimmable. Plus we take a look back at our programs on what teens have been reading this summer, the economic impact of the craft beer boom, and our program updating the health of two beloved New Hampshire species, loons and moose.  

Scott Heron; Flickr

What couldn't have a Week of Summer Favorites without including moose and loons!  For many Granite Staters, these creatures symbolize what makes our wild places special, but both face threats that are reducing their numbers. We'll discuss these threats, and ongoing efforts to support these two beloved N.H. animals.

This show originally aired on August 1, 2017. 

The Economics of New Hampshire's Craft Beer Industry

Aug 29, 2017
Danielle Griscti; Flickr

A Week of Summer Favorites continues with a look at the craft beer boom. Microbrews, nanobrews, tasting rooms, and seasonal pours...independent craft beer is on the rise in New Hampshire, but what is its economic impact? For beer fans and non-drinkers alike, the increase in small breweries is affecting New Hampshire tourism and small-town business growth. 

This show originally aired on August 8, 2017. 

What & How Teenagers Are Reading Today

Aug 28, 2017

Our Week of Summer Favorites continues with a look at teen reading. Smartphones, e-readers, and other internet-based content, like Twitter and Facebook, are changing how and what teenagers read. And despite the image of adolescents with their faces in their phones, it turns out young adult fiction is among the most successful types of books on the market.

  This show originally aired on June 12, 2017.

N.H. Lakes Association

Our Week of Summer Favorites starts with a dive into New Hampshire's lakes.  It's hard to overstate the importance of the state's lakes and ponds -- for recreation, tourism, the environment.  But with several water bodies already posted for cyanobacteria, we look at policies and practices  aimed at keeping lakes healthy -- and why they aren't always followed.

This show originally aired on June 20, 2017.   

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 25, 2017

Aug 24, 2017

Just weeks before the controversial new voting law, known as SB3, is to go into effect, two lawsuits are challenging its constitutionality.  One legal challenge comes from the New Hampshire Democratic Party, the other on behalf of the League of Women Voters of New Hampshire and three individual would-be voters.  

Nine states, including New Hampshire, that are part of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) agree to reduce carbon dioxide emissions an additional 30 percent below 2020 levels by 2030.  

Christopher Cantwell, a white nationalist from Keene, who has been in the headlines since the clashes in Charlottesville, is denied bond by a judge Thursday. He’s being held on three felony charges.

And we get an update on issues in the news in the Lake Sunapee area and in Laconia.

 


Panhandling in the Granite State

Aug 23, 2017
Ellen Grimm

In Manchester, recently installed signs discourage giving money to people on the streets, warning that cash could be used to buy drugs. Other communities around the state have tried a variety of approaches, as they grapple with the overlapping problems of addiction, homelessness, and mental illness. 


NHPR

The Exchange sat down with New Hampshire's senior U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen.  We covered topics from foreign policy to health care to Veterans, and took listener questions. 

I haven't heard anybody suggest that this is the view of all Republicans or the Republican Party. It certainly is not. I think one of the things that we should all be united on is that this kind of hate rhetoric, this white supremacy, the neo-Nazi groups, are not what we want to see in America...

“A Better Deal” --  That's how national Democratic leaders sum up their new pitch to voters, promising to tackle economic and political inequality.  Among their ideas: breaking up consolidated corporate power and lifting the minimum wage to fifteen dollars.  Reactions have been mixed.  We talk with Granite State Democrats about whether this new plan takes the party in the right direction.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 18, 2017

Aug 17, 2017

Continued fallout and reactions to events in Charlottesville, VA, dominate the headlines this week. New Hampshire politicians respond to the President’s ambiguous statements on white supremacy. And yes, there are white supremacists here in New Hampshire. 

In other news, the federal government says New Hampshire's Medicaid funding mechanism might be illegal. Manchester is considering filing its own lawsuit against an opioid company for its alleged role in the state opioid crisis.


NHPR

Before the new school year, we hear from several teachers from across the state, who work in different grade levels, about their hopes, concerns and goals for the upcoming year, from teaching the fundamentals to mandated testing, to creating a positive classroom climate. 


Educating The Educators On Childhood Trauma

Aug 15, 2017
Us Census Bureau

As the opioid crisis continues to rupture families, the emotional impact on children is widespread. In some school districts, mental health experts are training teachers, school nurses, and administrators to better manage the trauma faced by students, in order to help them cope and learn.


After the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, people in this region are looking more closely at local racist and anti-Semitic groups: their statements, their plans, and what may happen next.  We'll talk about those issues and gauge the overall New Hampshire reaction to what happened this weekend. 


Cleaning Up New Hampshire's Contaminated Water

Aug 11, 2017
US Air Force

Last spring, the chemical PFOA was found in unusually high levels in wells in Southern New Hampshire, and, before that, on the Seacoast. Since then, the state has allocated millions to study and fix these sites, but critics worry the guidelines for contaminated water, and the work being done, aren't enough.  


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 11, 2017

Aug 10, 2017

N.H.'s Attorney General files to sue Purdue Pharma over its role in the state’s opioid crisis. The President declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency - or did he?  The ACLU and the Secretary of State's Office agree N.H. will share voter information with the Trump election commission, but not as a digital database.  And Keno will be on the ballot in several N.H. cities this November.


Tom Hart via flickr/CC

With efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act set aside, states have been struggling to stabilize their Obamacare insurance markets, likely to see double-digit rate increases.  In New Hampshire, officials have been debating how to proceed -- while keeping an eye on what Congress or the President  might do next. 


Anticipating the Solar Eclipse Celestial Event

Aug 9, 2017
National Park Service

We get a preview of this month's total solar eclipse with a team of N.H. astronomers.  Although New Hampshire won't be in the "zone of totality," find out how to safely watch as the moon blocks out nearly 62% percent of the sun's light in N.H. on August 21.  The moon will being moving in front of the sun around 1:30pm, with peak coverage around 2:45pm.  In other astronomical news, we take a look back at 40 years of space exploration with  NASA's Voyager mission, the Curiosity Rover, and what Cassini has learned before it is deliberately crashed into Saturn.  


James Lee via flickr Creative Commons

The Exchange spoke with two independent craft brewers in New Hampshire, Nicole Carrier, of Throwback Brewery in North Hampton, Michael Hauptly-Pierce, of Lithermans Limited in Concord, and director of the new brewery at UNH, Cheryl Parker. UNH is starting a brewing minor in its College of Life Sciences and Agriculture this fall. 

Mark Crawley; Flickr

A new report weighs the economic pros and cons of second homes, especially in towns where they make up a huge chunk of local real estate. A recent forecast of state job growth holds good news for health care workers...and bad news for teachers.  And U.S. News ranks the fifty states, and finds Massachusetts and New Hampshire are the best.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 4, 2017

Aug 4, 2017

President Trump called New Hampshire a "drug-infested den," according to a transcript published by the Washington Post, and that's spurring strong reactions from local politicians and advocates alike.

Lawmakers and public officials are concerned about the health of the individual health insurance marketplace in New Hampshire, as rates are projected to increase significantly in the next year.

The Manchester VA gets a visit from U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs David Shulkin after whistle blowers alleged terrible conditions in the medical center.

And the state women's prison project has been delayed again. We'll cover these stories and more. 


As baby boomers age, and the opioid crisis continues to ravage the state, there is a rising need for guardians of people older than 18. But taking on someone else's financial and/or healthcare needs can be costly and emotionally taxing. We'll find out about the process in New Hampshire. 


Don't Swat That Bug! Beneficial Insects in N.H.

Aug 2, 2017
Wikimedia

Although ticks, mosquitos, and emerald ash borers get all the attention, New Hampshire is full of beneficial insects.  From predators to parasites to pollinators, countless species enhance our ecosystem. We identify these helpful insects and learn how they help in our gardens, forests, and even in harsh mountain environments.  

This show originally aired on July 12, 2017. 

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