The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show, hosted by Laura Knoy.  It airs live at 9 AM and rebroadcasts at 7 PM weekdays.

Want to call in during the show or leave us a message? Here's the number: 800.892.6477 

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

SPECIAL SERIES: Click here to explore and submit questions for our special series In Depth: Mental Illness in New Hampshire

If you can't listen to the live show or don't live in our broadcast area, you can listen to our show online (just open the day's show post below) or subscribe to our podcast. Click here to get it on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher. (Don't know how to find and listen to podcasts? Click here for a handy guide created by our friends at VPR!)

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Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 5/21 - (:40) Mental Health Series Kickoff: The Patients, The Providers, The System/(:20) Race for the First Candidate MacKenzie

Tuesday, 5/22 - Mental Health Series: Children's Mental Health

Wednesday, 5/23 - Mental Health Series: Criminal Justice and Mental Health

Thursday, 5/24 - Mental Health Series: The State Hospital & Community Support System

Friday, 5/25 -  Weekly N.H. News Roundup 

NHPR

Jeffrey Meyers, Commissioner of the Dept. of Health and Human Services oversees some of the state's most challenging issues: the opioid crisis and a struggling treatment network, a child protection system with high caseloads and under scrutiny, and a Medicaid expansion program under review.

Facebook's Data Scandal and You

Apr 16, 2018

For years, Facebook has collected personal information in order to direct advertising to consumers. But a recent scandal with political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica, which was able to collect this data, has raised huge concerns and a Congressional inquiry. 

N.H. Beaches Face Threat from Microplastics

Apr 16, 2018

New Hampshire beaches may look generally clean, but there's a big threat posed by tiny microplastics. Microplastics are defined as plastics between 1-5mm in size. They may be fragments of degraded larger plastic debris, synthetic fibers, or microbeads from cosmetics and toothpaste. We learn about research studying the prevalence of this microscopic debris on New Hampshire beaches, the threat it poses to marine ecosystems, and what we can do about it. 

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

In this Race for the 1st conversation, we talk with Deaglan McEachern, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 13, 2018

Apr 13, 2018

We look at the impact Paul Ryan's retirement may have, if any, on congressional races in New Hampshire. Former Democratic State Senator Molly Kelly decides to run for governor.  Debates over voting laws and victims' rights draw crowds at the statehouse.

Author Debby Irving's memoir, "Waking Up White" serves as inspiration for New Hampshire's Oyster River community, as it reflects on tough questions about race and tolerance.  The discussions come after incidents revealing discrimination and racism, in an area where many believed they had the best intentions.  We examine how a state like New Hampshire, that is mostly white, fits into the national narrative of racial strife, now and in the past.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

We talk with Republican and Democratic lawmakers about some major votes coming up at the Statehouse this session, including Medicaid expansion, now in the House;  a family and medical leave bill, under scrutiny in the senate; and a proposed Constitutional amendment on victims' rights, called Marsy's Law.

David Folkenflik joins us as part of our Justice & Journalism series with UNH Law School. We talk about the vast changes in journalism he's seen in recent years, from the impact of social media, to "fake news," to covering the #MeToo movement, including at NPR. 

Christiaan Colen; Flickr

Recent ransomware attacks in Atlanta and elsewhere in the country have cities, and businesses, rethinking their network security. And blockchain, a secure method of processing cryptocurrency, is getting a lot of buzz. What is it, who should use it, and why? 

In this Race for the 1st conversation, we talk with Terence O'Rourke, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. 

O'Rourke is the City Attorney for Rochester and a military veteran who served as an officer in the Iraq War. O'Rourke also served as an assistant U.S. attorney in Alabama, and in New Hampshire as assistant county attorney in Rockingham and Carroll counties. 

Our Race for the First conversations will focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 6, 2018

Apr 6, 2018

It's feeling a lot like primary season in New Hampshire, with two past, and possibly future, Presidential hopefuls making the rounds in the state.  The Internal Revenue Service also visits New Hampshire, examining state liquor sales.  And despite several high-profile animal abuse reports in the state, a bill to tighten breeding regulations gets pushback.

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, Wikimedia

 

Relief and Reconstruction in the Caribbean. A Catholic archbishop and bishop are visiting the state from Puerto Rico and the Virgin islands, a region hard hit by last September's hurricanes, to raise awareness about the suffering that continues there. Recovery has been slow, with thousands still lacking power and living in makeshift dwellings.  The bishops are here at the invitation of Bishop Peter A. Libasci, of Manchester, for an initiative called Through the Storm: Helping Our Brothers and Sisters in the Caribbean. For more information on the event, visit here

Ian Lamont

We look at two economic forces that directly impact each other: international trade and the stock market. What do trade announcements from Washington mean for New Hampshire, and how does a fluctuating stock market impact our economy? We'll also look at a big employer for Granite Staters: foreign companies.

New Hampshire is now tied for the second oldest population in the country and beginning to see the pressure on healthcare, services, and housing caused by the "silver tsunami."  In his new book,"The Longevity Economy,"  author Joseph Coughlin says the future is both older and "technologically-enabled." He makes the case for rethinking aging and retirement not as a burden, but as an economic catalyst that could transform business and society.

This program will be broadcast on-air on Tuesday, April 3, at 9:00 a.m. and 7 p.m.  It was originally broadcast on March 15, 2018.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In this Race For The 1st conversation, we talk with Mindi Messmer, a Democrat running in the closely watched race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District.

Scroll down for NHPR News takeaways from this interview

Messmer, a first-term legislator from Rye, runs an environmental consulting firm.  As a legislator, she serves on the Health, Human Services, and Elderly Affairs Committee, and on the Commission to Study Environmentally-Triggered Chronic Illness and the Commission on the Seacoast Cancer Cluster Investigations. 

Our Race For The First conversations will focus on the issues at the forefront in the CD1 race, including opioids, guns, veterans, and how each candidate plans to stand out in a crowded race. 

Brett Levin; Flickr

As a state commission on the issue meets again, we look at the debate in New Hampshire. We also talk to reporters from Maine and Massachusetts about how marijuana legalization is playing out in their states. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 30, 2018

Mar 29, 2018

There's been lots of talk about voter fraud in New Hampshire elections - we take a look at the reality found in the data behind the rhetoric.  Massachusetts drops the Northern Pass bid in favor of a Maine transmission line for a major energy project.  We get reaction from local veterans organizations on the firing of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin. And, hope springs eternal as the the Red Sox open the 2018 baseball season.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Aside from overseeing state records and  administering elections, the office of Secretary of State has taken on a highly political dimension in recent years -- in New Hampshire  and elsewhere -- in part because voting-law debates have become so divisive. We'll look into what the job involves and why it has become so political.  

Should N.H. Consider Safe Injection Sites?

Mar 27, 2018
Wikimedia

With New Hampshire struggling in the midst of an opioid crisis, we look at a controversial idea - creating safe places for addicts to inject drugs without fear of infected needles and with access to overdose medication. Several cities in the U.S. and Canada are considering this form of what's called "harm reduction" as a way to address rising overdose rates as well as the public health crisis.  But it is a controversial idea, seen by others as indulging and encouraging addiction.  

Veterinarians On Their Profession

Mar 26, 2018
U.S. Air Force

We sit down with veterinarians from around the state to talk about what a typical day looks like, what they wish pet owners knew, and how the opioid crisis, high costs, and other factors impact their profession. 

The Latest Thinking on Substance Abuse Prevention

Mar 23, 2018
Randy Robertson via flickr/CC

Scare tactics and catchy slogans don't work, many experts now say.  But if that's the case, then how best to keep people from becoming addicted to drugs or alcohol?  We find out what works, what doesn't, and where most efforts take place: While many look to schools, our guests say it requires a much broader approach.

This program is part of NHPR's Crossroad project, a station-wide look at the addiction crisis and its impact on the state. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 23, 2018

Mar 23, 2018

In a visit to Manchester this week, President Trump discusses efforts to combat the opioid crisis and floats the idea of the death penalty for drug traffickers.  With the deadline for bills in the legislature to "crossover" from one chamber to the other, we look at which bills struggled, which sailed through, and what is still up for debate.  Plus,  a last-minute attempt to change the Granite State’s gun laws.

Ken Lund; Flickr

The long-standing current use program gives favorable tax treatment to landowners who preserve open space, typically farmland or forest. But current use has always had detractors, who say it sets up an unfair tax system, and reduces revenue available to towns. 

2020 Presidential Primary Preview

Mar 21, 2018

New Hampshire's "First in the Nation" presidential primaries are nearly two years away, but speculation has already begun.  If a Republican candidate challenges the president, it would be the first time in 25 years that a sitting president has faced a serious challenge from his own party.

Outside/In

There are 27 springs in New Hampshire that some Granite Staters use as their primary water source. NHPR's Outside/In visited these springs, and investigated the truth and myth behind the raw water movement. Why are some people turning to unfiltered water, and what should you know about spring drinking?  

Visit the Outside/In website to hear their episode, and subscribe to their podcast, and to see the test results for contaminants from three springs in New Hampshire. 

American kids are grappling with chronic stress and toxic anxiety, even as parents seek the balance between "helicopter" and "free-range" parenting.  Ned Johnson, co-author of a new book, "The Self-Driven Child" says brain science shows that stress has physical effects on the developing brain with long-term ramifications.  So what's a parent to do?  In the "Self-Driven Child," he advocates for a radical shift in the dynamic between parent and child to develop greater self-reliance and resilience in children.

Creative Commons Zero - CCO

There have long been complaints that the state's extensive training and certification requirements for some fields have led to workforce shortages, and the House recently passed a bill for a less restrictive approach. But opponents say caution is warranted - to protect the public and professional integrity.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 16, 2018

Mar 16, 2018

New Hampshire students join thousands around the country in walking out of their classrooms to protest school shootings and NRA influence. The New Hampshire Attorney General finds that a state trooper was justified in shooting and killing an unarmed Enfield man.  And Secretary of State Bill Gardner, with 42 years on the job, faces a rare re-election challenge -- this time, from former Democratic gubernatorial candidate Colin Van Ostern.

Tracy Lee Carroll/NHPR

This week, Granite Staters are meeting, many in blizzard conditions, to hash out their town's budgets and priorities -- either in the traditional town meeting form, when voting and discussion take place on the same day, or as part of a newer form of town government, known as SB2, which involves a deliberative session and a separate day for voting.  We're sitting down with four seasoned town moderators to discuss how local government is working nowadays in their towns.  

GUESTS: 

To celebrate 20 years of Something Wild on NHPR, we take a look at how New Hampshire has changed in terms of nature and ecology over the two decades the program has been on the air.  

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