The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on iTunes, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 4/24 - Vote First Or Die: The New Hampshire Primary by Scott Conroy

Tuesday, 4/25 - An Update on Energy

Wednesday, 4/26 - The Balance of Power Between the President and Congress

Thursday, 4/27 - Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War by James Wright

Friday, 4/28 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup
 

Bi-partisan frustration rises in the Granite State over President Trumps unsubstantiated charges of New Hampshire voter fraud.  The New Hampshire House votes to kill a Right-to-Work bill, which would have impacted how unions collect fees. The policy has been a priority for Republicans, who control the House, Senate and Governor’s Office for the first time in more than a decade.  And the Executive Council confirms the Governor's choice for Education Commissioner, Frank Edelblut. 


Caring for Those With Chronic Pain: A Doctor's Story

Feb 15, 2017
openDemocracy via Flickr/Creative Commons

In his new book, Needless Suffering: How Society Fails Those With Chronic Pain, Dr. David Nagel says that when the medical system can't cure patients' pain, it often blames them instead.  Nagel proposes what he calls a more effective and compassionate approach. 

  This program was originally broadcast on 8/10/16.

Torange.biz

Researchers in psychology, neuroscience, and economics find that a child's earliest experiences, even before kindergarten, can have far-reaching effects, according to a new RAND report called "Making the Case for Investment in NH's Children."  

   


Love In The Digital Era

Feb 14, 2017
Pixabay.com

We're nearly always connected thanks to technology like social media, dating apps, and smartphones. Others are only a click away, making it easier to keep in touch, and meet new people. But could this technology change the way we interact face-to-face, or impact our long-term relationships?


A Conversation With Governor Chris Sununu

Feb 13, 2017
Allegra Boverman; NHPR

We sit down with Governor Chris Sununu. The new governor delivered his first budget on Thursday, boosting spending in many areas. We'll talk about that -- and about the Governor's plans for workforce development, reducing energy costs, and Medicaid expansion. We'll also get his take on President Trump's recent claims of widespread voter fraud in New Hampshire. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 10, 2017

Feb 9, 2017

We discuss the implications for the state following Governor Chris Sununu's address outlining his two-year spending plan.  A N.H. house committee voted against passage of Right-to-Work legislation; the bill goes to the full house next week.  A paid family and medical leave bill won’t be voted on this year, despite community and bipartisan support. And a new report says Manchester's drug problem is still serious but efforts to address it are working.


N.H.'s Biennial Budget Process

Feb 8, 2017

We examine how New Hampshire crafts it's two-year spending plan, which kicks off with the Governor's budget address.  In the next few months,  a lot will happen both in public forums and behind the scenes. State spending and revenues will dominate the discussion, as well as which services will receive funding and which will see cuts.  


Who Should Have Access To Medical Marijuana?

Feb 8, 2017
Pixabay.com

Several bills in the New Hampshire legislature would extend the list of qualifying conditions for therapeutic cannabis, including chronic pain and PTSD. But a new report from the National Academy of Sciences finds that "cannabis has both therapeutic value and public health risks."


Herry Lanford via Flickr/CC

Repeal, Replace, Repair, Retain. Now that they’re in a position to dismantle Obamacare, some in the GOP appear to be urging restraint. Even President Trump, who joined the Repeal and Replace rallying cry during his campaign, has recently sounded more hesitant, suggesting that a new plan may be in place next year.

Republicans in Congress have meanwhile been contemplating their next steps, said Dan Gorenstein, senior reporter for Marketplace's Health Desk, on  The Exchange.

Mark Goebel via Flickr/CC

Young and Old: They may seem like unlikely neighbors but millennials and seniors actually share many lifestyle preferences: walkable, diverse neighborhoods, smaller homes, and access to public transportation. Municipal officials and planners are taking note... We'll find out what they're doing around New England to encourage this mixing of generations. 


Linelle Photography via Flickr/CC

For years, the Republican mantra has been Repeal and Replace.  Turns out that's easier said than done. Now that they're in a position to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, some in the GOP seem more inclined to "Repeal and Repair," retaining certain popular elements of the law. We'll examine the proposals now in play and what they might mean for healthcare in the Granite State.  


Amy Quinton; NHPR

New Hampshire already permits a limited amount of net-metering, which allows solar panel owners to sell some power back to the electric grid.  The solar industry has long called for those limits to be lifted, but the state's utilities say they can only accommodate so much, without passing on costs to other customers. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 3, 2017

Feb 3, 2017

We'll discuss reaction in New Hampshire to President Trump's executive orders and cabinet picks. Frank Edleblut has the support he needs to be confirmed Commissioner of Education, but the vote is delayed. Former Senator Kelly Ayotte signs on with the Trump administration to help Judge Neil Gorsuch persuade US Senators to support his nomination to the Supreme court.  And, attention at the statehouse will soon turn to the budget Chris Sununu will present to lawmakers next week.  


Jonas Bengtsson via Flickr/CC

UPDATE: Reza Jalili was reunited with his brother, after a federal judge halted President Trump's executive order banning travel from seven predominantly Muslim countries, including Iran. Read the Union Leader story about their reunion

School Choice in the Granite State

Jan 31, 2017
NHPR

At the local and national level, the movement to give families more options outside of their local district gains traction. In New Hampshire, several proposed bills would provide more funds and greater access to charter schools and other forms of education. But some worry these efforts will harm public school districts and rural counties.  


The Immigration Order: Impact on the Granite State

Jan 30, 2017
Kitt Hodsden; Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire reaction to the Trump immigration order. We hear from an array of Granite State voices:  politicians who feel this will, in the end, make the state safer.  Immigrants and refugees worried about their families and their futures. Colleges who welcome foreign students.  And major employers from hi-tech to hospitals.

GUESTS:

How Divided Are We On Abortion?

Jan 30, 2017

Friday's annual March for Life in Washington occurred a week after the Women's March on Washington, which included an abortion-rights message.  And last week, the Trump Administration revived a ban on foreign aid to groups that provide abortion counseling, bolstering anti-abortion groups.  We ask how Americans feel about abortion, 44 years after it became legal --  and whether our laws reflect those feelings.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 27, 2017

Jan 26, 2017

Authorities identify the killer in two New Hampshire cold cases.  The head of New Hampshire's beleaguered child protection agency announces her retirement.  And, as claims of election fraud return to national headlines, lawmakers here consider a slate of changes to state voting laws.  


Omer Unlu

The new team in Washington inherits all the old challenges from the Middle East: threats from ISIS, the Syrian Civil War, and questions about the last administration's Iran nuclear deal. Our guests have, for years, worked as scholars, diplomats, and businesspeople in the Middle East. They discuss the challenges facing our new administration.


U.S. Navy Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daniel Viramontes, Wikimedia Commons

Adults with developmental disabilities in New Hampshire have long struggled to find adequate support once they leave the school system. This legislative season, lawmakers will vote on a bill that would give a 2% raise to workers who care for these Granite Staters - with the aim of boosting the workforce serving this population.  

Ajay Suresh / flickr/cc

Evidence is growing that certain medicines can ease cravings for drugs and alcohol and improve people's lives. And the medical community, backed by substantial federal funding, is promoting these drugs, calling them life-savers in many cases. But there are skeptics: Some who feel this approach merely replaces one addiction for another and others who fear this is just another profit-making venture of so-called "big pharma."


Petty Officer 2nd Class Tiarra Fulgham; Wikimedia Commons

Adults with developmental disabilities are provided government assistance, including services they used to get from the school system as children. But for years, there's been a waiting list for that help, despite political promises and attempts at reform.  We ask why the state keeps falling short for these adults and their families.

Producer's Note: Read our additional coverage of this show. 


N.H.'s Moose Population Decimated by Winter Ticks

Jan 23, 2017
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Midwest Region

 New Hampshire's moose population is down to just over 4,000 animals, facing an unprecedented die off because of winter ticks, according to UNH Wildlife Ecology professor Pete Pekins. 

Speaking on The Exchange, Pekins says winter ticks have taken an especially harsh toll on moose calves each spring for the past three years -- one of several alarming findings in a four-year study of the state's moose population, involving the N.H. Fish and Game department and UNH. 

The State of the State's Moose

Jan 23, 2017
NH Fish & Game

More than a North Country mascot, moose are an indicator of ecosystem health and climate change. With populations in New Hampshire decimated in recent years, a four-year, three-state study is collecting data on the health of the moose population and the devastation caused by winter ticks.  We discuss other threats to the moose population, such as brainworm, and how moose are managed in the state.

Yortw via Flickr/CC

Organizers of this weekend's Women's March on Washington have taken pains to avoid calling the event-- and the hundreds of "sister marches" planned across the country -- anti-Trump.  As Terie Norelli, former Democratic Speaker of the N.H. House and a longtime state representative,  said on The Exchange this week:

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 20, 2017

Jan 19, 2017

Governor Sununu picks a former rival to head the education department, and orders restrictions on state hiring.  First District Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter will not attend Donald Trump's inauguration, going to a religious service instead. And new numbers show the state's unemployment rate at just 2.6 percent. 

GUESTS:

The Women's March on Washington

Jan 19, 2017
Flickr

The day after Donald Trump's inauguration, hundreds of thousands of women are expected to protest in the Capitol and in cities around the country, including New Hampshire.  But about forty percent of female voters chose Trump, and so more widespread unity may be an elusive cause. 


Wally Gobetz via Flickr/CC

A recent survey finds most adults are a little rusty on their civics, with three-quarters unable to name all three branches of government -- the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial.  That's the lowest showing in some time. We ask why and how much it matters.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: January 13, 2017

Jan 13, 2017

The New Hampshire Senate moves quickly on hot-button GOP priorities like Right-to-Work and Concealed Carry.  Senator Jeanne Shaheen grills Rex Tillerson about lifting Russian sanctions in confirmation hearings for Secretary of State.  And the issue of "ballot selfies" continues to be a topic of debate in the state.


Cory Doctorow; Flickr

Hate incidents on college campuses have been on the rise recently, raising these questions among college and high school students alike: What's free speech?  And what's hate speech? What's dissent?  What's a threat?  

This show originally aired on November 29, 2016. 

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