The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 5/22 - The 2017 N.H. Tick Forecast

Tuesday, 5/23 - TBA

Wednesday, 5/24 - TBA

Thursday, 5/25 - Economic Roundup

Friday, 5/26 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup
 

Michael Brindley for NHPR

A Senate bill that would alter the definition of “domicile” for voting purposes has caused an outcry among Democrats and others who claim it unnecessarily complicates the voting process and would suppress the vote among certain groups, including college students.

At a recent packed hearing, the vast majority were in opposition to the proposed changes.

Republican State Senator Regina Birdsell, lead sponsor of the bill, says her intention is not to exclude anyone. 

New Hampshire Public Radio

We're discussing proposed changes, under Senate Bill 3, to the state's legal definition of domicile:  An inhabitant's domicile for voting purposes is that one place where a person, more than any other place, has established a physical presence and manifests an intent to maintain a single continuous presence for domestic, social, and civil purposes relevant to participating in democratic self-government.  A person has the right to change domicile at any time, however a mere intention to change domicile in the future does not, of itself, terminate an established domicile before the person actually moves.  

Supporters of Senate Bill 3 say the above definition needs clarifying and tightening in order to avoid voting abuses. Opponents say proposed changes are, at best, unnecessary, and at worst, could dissuade certain people from going to the polls. 


NHPR

The winter tourism industry in New Hampshire provides thousands of jobs and garners millions of visits to resorts across the state. In the past few years, however, shorter, irregular seasons have forced ski resorts to adapt, either by using snow machines far more than expected, or preparing for fewer customers. Today, we're looking at how skiing, and winter sports, are changing across the Granite State. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 10, 2017

Mar 9, 2017

The N.H. legislature had a full calendar this week, debating changes to the state’s election laws, transgender rights and marijuana decriminalization.  N.H.'s congressional delegation reacts to President Trump's revised travel ban, and assesses the impact in  N.H, and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions makes a surprise visit to an N.H. youth summit on opioid abuse.


The Southern Illinoisian

Their mug shots are now regularly featured in the news -- people swept up in Operation Granite Hammer, an anti-drug enforcement program that started in 2015. Since then, police have made more than 100 drug arrests. They have been particularly tough on dealers whose deals turn lethal, pursuing long sentences in those cases.  But many on the treatment end warn tough sentences and tactics do little to quell the demand for drugs, and dealers themselves are often addicts, who need care, not incarceration.


Fred McNeill

Too often, says civil engineer Fred McNeill, it takes a disaster – sinkholes swallowing cars or dam bursts flooding communities -- to get the attention of officials and others who fund the underpinnings of wastewater treatment and dam infrastructure.  

Allegra Boverman; NHPR

Both President Trump and Governor Sununu released details about proposed budget plans within the last few weeks, so we'll discuss the impacts of these plans, including increased defense spending, and more funds for managing the opioid crisis. We'll also look at current wage and unemployment statistics in the state, and how Granite Staters feel about their economy. 


Amy Quinton; NHPR

Officials overseeing the state’s dams and wastewater treatment plants say they’re heartened by calls for more investment in infrastructure by Governor Sununu and President Trump.

But they're also alarmed by the Trump Administration’s proposed cuts to the EPA.

Speaking on The Exchange, Fred McNeill, Chief Engineer at Manchester’s Environmental Protection Division, says the EPA funds several state positions that help maintain and improve the city’s one thousand miles of underground water infrastructure.  McNeill is concerned these jobs may now be eliminated.

Kieth Shields; NHPR

A continuation of our series on New Hampshire infrastructure: wastewater and dam structures are old, crumbling, and vulnerable to severe weather. Intense storms, flooding, and drought have all contributed to the damage, and many of our dams and underground pipes are over 100 years old. We'll discuss the challenges with tackling this problem, including lack of funding, and stricter regulation requirements.


New Hampshire Public Radio

Not too long ago, New Hampshire was faulted for casting too wide a net when it came to institutionalizing people with mental illness.  That led to a lawsuit and a $30 million settlement, with the state agreeing to boost community-based care.

Now, though, according to Ken Norton, executive director of the NH chapter of the Alliance on Mental Illness, the state has swung too far in the other direction, with inadequate access to institutionalized care:

New Hampshire Public Radio

Under a court settlement, the state agreed to boost support for community-based services, with the aim of keeping people out of institutions like psychiatric hospitals. But the need for this kind of care has not abated, raising the question: Does the state need to re-think how it spends it mental health resources, to shore up both ends of the system?


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 3, 2017

Mar 2, 2017

Governor Chris Sununu returns from a trip to Washington bullish on block grants and President Trump.  New Hampshire's  all-democratic congressional delegation have different views of the President and his address to Congress.  Here in New Hampshire, a North Country judge drops murder charges for Celina Cass's stepfather due to mental competency. 


Rogue Heroes: The History of the S.A.S

Feb 28, 2017

In his book "Rogue Heroes" author Ben Macintyre describes the origins of Britain's notoriously secret special forces unit, the S.A.S.  The inspiration for special forces around the world, the S.A.S. was originally made up of eccentric rogues and miscreants  who did not fit into the ranks of the regular Army. Their motto "who dares wins" became the most famous military motto in Britain.


Anticipating Trump's Budget Proposal

Feb 27, 2017

We preview President Trump's first federal budget proposal.  We've learned to expect the unexpected from Trump; will that trend continue when he releases his budget in the next few weeks? We examine which campaign promises may become reality, look at where tax cuts may apply, and examine the prognosis for the ACA, entitlements and immigration.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Compared with the University System of New Hampshire, which was flat funded under the budget Republican Governor Chris Sununu presented earlier this month, the community college system did pretty well.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 24, 2017

Feb 23, 2017

Governor Sununu signs his first bill into law; it makes New Hampshire the 11th state to allow gun owners to carry concealed without a permit.  A bill  to extend civil rights protections to people who are transgender wins the backing of a house committee.  And former St. Paul's student Owen Labrie is back in court seeking a new trial.


The State Of N.H.'s Community College System

Feb 22, 2017
WMCC

New Hampshire's Community College system is made up of seven schools around the state. We check in with Chancellor Ross Gittell about the role the system plays in workforce development; Governor Chris Sununu increased money for the community college system in his budget proposal.  The boost comes after years of  frustration among staff about how the system is being run. 


Rick via Flickr/CC

Update: Governor Sununu signed this bill earlier today, Feb. 22,2017. 

 

 

N.H. is heading with seeming inevitability toward joining the states that do not require a special permit to carry a concealed weapon. Governor Sununu is expected to sign SB12, which has passed both the Senate and the House, mostly along party lines.

 

Similar bills have failed in the past. Former Democratic Governor Maggie Hassan twice vetoed similar efforts.  

 

Supporters of repealing the permit requirement say local officials too often deny permits.

New Hampshire's Roads and Bridges

Feb 21, 2017
NHPR

Transportation infrastructure is a perennial issue in the Granite State:  from aging bridges to annoying potholes to highways and byways in need of repair. Now, Governor Sununu's budget includes an Infrastructure Revitalization Fund that sends money to communities to address this. And President Trump has promised a major effort as well.  


N.H. Debates Gun Rights and Restrictions

Feb 20, 2017
Rick via Flickr/CC

 New Hampshire lawmakers have been debating a number of gun-related bills this year, looking at where firearms should be permitted, who should be allowed to have them, and how they can be worn in public.  We'll look at these proposals, the issues they raise - also who's behind them and who isn't. 


Allegra Boverman for New Hampshire Public Radio

N.H. Republican Governor Chris Sununu reinforced his support for President Trump during an in-depth Exchange interview  last week, even as he acknowledged that certain matters could have gone more smoothly in recent weeks.   He also discussed his budget, defending his decision to boost funding for community colleges but not the university system, which expressed "deep disappointment" in the decision.

The Founding Father's Warning to Future Generations

Feb 19, 2017

As he left office, George Washington took to the newspaper to warn future generations about the forces he believed could destroy the republic; among them, hyper-partisanship, debt, and foreign influence.  We talk with John Avlon, the author of "Washington's Farewell," about this address and how it has resonated through history.

GUEST:   John Avlon, Editor-in-Chief of The Daily Beast and a CNN political analyst.

  This program was originally broadcast on January 18, 2017.

Bi-partisan frustration rises in the Granite State over President Trumps unsubstantiated charges of New Hampshire voter fraud.  The New Hampshire House votes to kill a Right-to-Work bill, which would have impacted how unions collect fees. The policy has been a priority for Republicans, who control the House, Senate and Governor’s Office for the first time in more than a decade.  And the Executive Council confirms the Governor's choice for Education Commissioner, Frank Edelblut. 


Caring for Those With Chronic Pain: A Doctor's Story

Feb 15, 2017
openDemocracy via Flickr/Creative Commons

In his new book, Needless Suffering: How Society Fails Those With Chronic Pain, Dr. David Nagel says that when the medical system can't cure patients' pain, it often blames them instead.  Nagel proposes what he calls a more effective and compassionate approach. 

  This program was originally broadcast on 8/10/16.

Torange.biz

Researchers in psychology, neuroscience, and economics find that a child's earliest experiences, even before kindergarten, can have far-reaching effects, according to a new RAND report called "Making the Case for Investment in NH's Children."  

   


Love In The Digital Era

Feb 14, 2017
Pixabay.com

We're nearly always connected thanks to technology like social media, dating apps, and smartphones. Others are only a click away, making it easier to keep in touch, and meet new people. But could this technology change the way we interact face-to-face, or impact our long-term relationships?


A Conversation With Governor Chris Sununu

Feb 13, 2017
Allegra Boverman; NHPR

We sit down with Governor Chris Sununu. The new governor delivered his first budget on Thursday, boosting spending in many areas. We'll talk about that -- and about the Governor's plans for workforce development, reducing energy costs, and Medicaid expansion. We'll also get his take on President Trump's recent claims of widespread voter fraud in New Hampshire. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: February 10, 2017

Feb 9, 2017

We discuss the implications for the state following Governor Chris Sununu's address outlining his two-year spending plan.  A N.H. house committee voted against passage of Right-to-Work legislation; the bill goes to the full house next week.  A paid family and medical leave bill won’t be voted on this year, despite community and bipartisan support. And a new report says Manchester's drug problem is still serious but efforts to address it are working.


N.H.'s Biennial Budget Process

Feb 8, 2017

We examine how New Hampshire crafts it's two-year spending plan, which kicks off with the Governor's budget address.  In the next few months,  a lot will happen both in public forums and behind the scenes. State spending and revenues will dominate the discussion, as well as which services will receive funding and which will see cuts.  


Who Should Have Access To Medical Marijuana?

Feb 8, 2017
Pixabay.com

Several bills in the New Hampshire legislature would extend the list of qualifying conditions for therapeutic cannabis, including chronic pain and PTSD. But a new report from the National Academy of Sciences finds that "cannabis has both therapeutic value and public health risks."


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