The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

Want to leave us a message? Call this number anytime: 202.649.0835

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 8/21 - New Hampshire Democrats Respond to the Democratic "Better Deal"

Tuesday, 8/22 - Working as an Artist in N.H. 

Wednesday, 8/23 - Senator Jeanne Shaheen

Thursday, 8/24 - How Cities are Managing Panhandling 

Friday, 8/25 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 9, 2017

Jun 9, 2017

It was another busy week: former FBI Director James Comey gave testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee yesterday, Governor Sununu aligned with President Trump on his decision to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement, and there's more wrangling over the state budget. 


"The Baker's Secret" & The Anniversary of D-Day

Jun 7, 2017
Photo by Stephen Kiernan

We commemorate the 100th anniversary of D-Day with a new novel by Vermont author Stephen Kiernan. "The Baker's Secret" is set in a small Normandy village on the eve of D-Day, and tells the story of a village baker who finds a way to overcome the day-to-day tyranny of the Nazi occupiers. Rather than a story of armies and battles, it offers the French perspective, as they were trapped in their coastal communities during the assault, struggling to keep hope alive by caring for each other.   


NHPR Flickr

According to a report from the Project on Student Debt in 2016, New Hampshire college students graduate with the highest debt in the nation, at $36,101. As college tuition prices continue to rise, those in Washington look to reform the college loan system, including consolidating federal loans into management by one company. We'll discuss how this might impact our students in New Hampshire, and other issues related to affording college. 


Molggl Interactive via Flickr/CC

In the wake of a bear family’s relocation after two cubs entered a Hanover household, New Hampshire communities are reconsidering their responsibilities as environmental stewards and asking the question, “What does it take to live with bears?”

Mark Moz via Flickr

New Hampshire's housing market is fiercely competitive and expensive these days. Available homes are few and far between --  a situation otherwise known as "low inventory."  That means it's  a good time to sell --  but buying a home is another story. 

Here's how quickly houses are selling, according to Russ Thibeault, president of Applied Economic Research, an economic and real estate consulting firm in Laconia: "If the paint’s dry, the unit’s filled."

Living with Black Bears in Back Yards

Jun 5, 2017

The recent saga of the troublesome family of bears in Hanover, destined to be killed after they entered a home in search of food, is one of the latest examples of conflict between black bears and humans in New Hampshire.  Governor Chris Sununu intervened, and the three yearlings were captured and relocated to the north country, although the mother bear has yet to be located.  The Hanover human-bear conflict generated concern nationwide, with hundreds signing an online petition and flooding N.H. Fish & Game with calls.  Why did this conflict resonate with so many - and how do we continue to live with bears in New Hampshire?

 


Mark Motz; Flickr

Rising prices and tightening inventory spells good news for sellers and bad news for buyers, particularly first-time home buyers and the state's aging population, who have to compete for the same types of homes in an increasingly fast-paced market. What does it take to buy a home today, and what do these trends mean for the state? 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 2, 2017

Jun 1, 2017

After more than ten hours of debate, the New Hampshire Senate passes a GOP-crafted state budget along party lines. The N.H. House will vote on the plan next week. Three significant pieces of voting legislation are up for a final vote in the House.   Former Manchester Police Chief David Mara takes over as the Governor's Advisor on Addiction and Behavioral Health, known as the "drug czar".  Mara currently serves as interim police chief in Portsmouth. 

Wikimedia Commons

All eyes have been on the Senate after the House failed to pass its own version of the budget earlier this year – for the first time in decades.  The Senate budget includes much of what House budget writers agreed on, though it spends less and includes business tax cuts.


Olja Antic; Flickr

A female superhero, intergalactic travel, a beach-body reboot, and more - this year's summer film schedule is jam-packed with big action, but also some satisfying classic comedy and thought-provoking drama. We'll talk about the must-sees, and the maybe-avoids.


Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War

May 26, 2017

The Vietnam War is largely recalled as a mistake, either in the decision to engage there or in the nature of the engagement.  Veterans of the war remain largely anonymous figures.  Enduring Vietnam recounts the experiences of the young Americans who fought in Vietnam and of families who grieved those who did not return. We talk with author James Wright about the “baby boomers” who grew up in the 1950s, why they went into the military,  how they describe serving in “Nam” and their experiences coming home.

GUEST:  James Wright is author and editor of several history books and a former history professor at Dartmouth College as well as former Dartmouth College President.

This program was originally broadcast on 4/27/17.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 26, 2017

May 25, 2017

Senate Republicans are confident their state budget plan will clear the full Senate. A  full-day kindergarten proposal is tied to the lottery game KENO.  St. Paul’s School releases a report detailing allegations of sexual assault by faculty and staff decades ago. And Fish & Game Officials are flooded with calls to save trouble-making bears in Hanover.


NHPR Flickr

One leading economist says the Granite State is "getting its groove back," with GDP growth up three percent in twenty sixteen. Also, the gig economy, including freelance and contract work, gains traction here, and job prospects widen for the state's aging workforce.


Coast Guard Compass

Decades after President Nixon declared drugs "public enemy number one,"  the criminal justice system is still grappling with the problem.  In recent years, we've seen bipartisan calls for an end to so-called mass incarceration for drug crimes and a shift away from the so-called "war on drugs" toward greater emphasis on treatment for addiction.

As Acting U.S. Attorney John Farley sees it, the phrase "war on drugs" is a bit of a buzz term that oversimplifies a battle now being waged on two fronts.   

NuLawLab; Vimeo

Where are we - in The War on Drugs? Decades after President Nixon declared drugs "public enemy number one,"  the criminal justice system is still grappling with this.  In recent years, we've seen bipartisan calls for an end to so-called mass incarceration for drug crimes.  But now, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is taking a tougher stance on sentencing. 


NHPR

Normandeau's agency's been swamped by a rising number of hikers needing rescue. We'll talk about that, also continued funding struggles, controversy over gun politics, and Fish and Game's starring role in the TV show "North Woods Law: New Hampshire" on Animal Planet. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 19, 2017

May 18, 2017

N.H. political figures respond to this week's turmoil in Washington D.C., quelled to some extent by the appointment of the widely respected Robert S. Mueller III as special counsel to  investigate possible Russian meddling in the 2016 election. State representative Robert Fisher resigns after a N.H. House committee inquiry into his postings on the misogynistic Reddit forum known as the Red Pill. And several racially-charged incidents in recent weeks cloud graduation season at UNH's Durham campus.


"13 Reasons Why" & How to Talk About Teen Suicide

May 17, 2017
Jason Rogers / flickr/cc

The controversial Netflix series "Thirteen Reasons Why" has brought  the issues of sexual assault, cyberbullying, and suicide to millions of young viewers.  But it's upset many in the mental health field, who feel the show glorifies suicide.  That has sparked a renewed conversation about these topics and the best way to present them, especially in an age when shows and images can go viral before parents can tune in.


Wikimedia Commons

The Exchange discussed New Hampshire's infrastructure issues over a series of shows this year. The American Society of Civil Engineers released their 2017 report card in March, giving New Hampshire a C- overall, with further grades for specific categories, including roads, dams, and drinking water.

Read on for highlights and links to each show, and also for links to additional coverage of New Hampshire's infrastructure. 

Wikimedia Commons

The term net neutrality has been popping up a lot in recent months, as the policy is reviewed in Washington.  But what does it mean for an Internet service provider to be neutral? We look at how two key aspects of this:  web speed, and the management of Internet traffic, impact our daily browsing, businesses, and privacy. 


Libraries Look To The Future

May 16, 2017
Alex Prolmos via Flickr/CC

We look at how digital technology is challenging public libraries to redefine their role in the 21st century. While many still enjoy borrowing books, libraries are using social media and digital technology to expand their programs and establish themselves as vibrant community spaces.  In rural New Hampshire, they also provide vital access to technology for residents.

 

 

 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu has called the GOP's American Health Care Act a "huge win" --  for moving the conversation forward on repealing and replacing Obamacare. As for the content of that House bill, Sununu said on The Exchange: "I don't think anything in this bill is a huge win. I have reservations. I wouldn’t have voted for it myself."

Governor Chris Sununu on The Exchange

May 15, 2017
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu sits down with The Exchange to discuss the Republican health care overhaul currently in the U.S. Senate -- and implications for the opioid crisis in the Granite State.  

We'll get Sununu's take on the two-year spending plan for the state, after the House failed to come up with its own version of the budget for the first time in recent memory.  And we look at the recent controversy over mental health staffing at the New Hampshire State Hospital.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 12, 2017

May 12, 2017

President Trump names N.H. Secretary of State Bill Gardner to a Presidential Commission on Election Integrity. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price visits New Hampshire to hear about the state’s response to the opioid crisis.  And legislative hearings into online postings by two state reps become contentious.  


Michael Rabb; Vimeo

A crucial part of the troubled Division of Children Youth and Families, the state’s foster care system, faces serious problems of its own. A  shortage of families, a complicated and backlogged system , and a deficit of resources, all contribute to the problem of finding safe and stable homes for children. 


What's Next With North Korea?

May 9, 2017
(Stephan) via Flickr/CC

The Trump Administration says the "era of strategic patience" is over as the secretive country's regime increasingly threatens the region with both actions and words.  We examine the tensions today, their roots going back decades, and the huge importance of North Korea's neighbors, including China and South Korea.


US EPA

The American Society of Civil Engineers recently gave the Granite State a C-minus on its 2017 report card...But aging systems, drought, and such contaminants as PFOAs raise questions about how best to repair our drinking water systems, and how to afford it. 


Smithsonian Institute Magazine

With North Korea flexing its nuclear muscles and the U.S. calling for an end to the "era of strategic patience,"  it's a good time to re-examine where we are as a world when it comes to nuclear weapons -- and where we've been.  Lisbeth Gronlund, co-director of the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, says giving one person the power to launch a nuclear strike has long been a dangerous proposition.  She joined The Exchange recently to discuss her ideas for reducing the risk of nuclear conflict.  

Airman 1st Class Greg Nash

Technology is developing more quickly than the security to protect it, leaving the personal information of millions at risk. Your health records, schedule, shopping habits, and more are  vulnerable to potential hackers. As the "Internet of things" grows, and more companies collect information on their customers, called big data, how can you protect yourself?


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 5, 2017

May 5, 2017

The NH House investigates Rep. Robert Fisher for alleged offensive and mysognistic "Red Pill" forum postings, and decides to include tweets by Rep. Sherry Frost in the inquiry. Full-day kindergarten gets the green light with a vote for full funding in the NH House. State health officials blame Dartmouth-Hitchcock for understaffing at the state mental hospital. 


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