The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 8 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on iTunes, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Next Week on The Exchange:

Monday, 5/30 - Conflict Journalism

Tuesday, 5/31 - Changing PFOA Guidelines

Wednesday, 6/1 - Schools as Social Safety Nets

Thursday, 6/2 - Social Security

Friday, 6/3 - Friday N.H. News Roundup

Another Look at Commuter Rail in N.H.

Mar 8, 2016
lzcdome / Flickr/CC

For years, advocates of commuter rail have pushed the idea of a passenger train connecting Boston with at Nashua and Manchester, and even possibly Concord. But commuter rail has always bumped up against one huge, seemingly immovable object:  money.  It's not cheap to build such a system,  roughly two-hundred-million dollars - and so the argument has long been that it's just not worth it, given all the other priorities New Hampshire has, including roads and bridges that need repair.  However, this year, supporters are continuing their efforts, bolstered by rising business backing in the Southern Tier.  And just recently,  they urged a House Committee to keep four million dollars in the state's transportation plan to fund rail study and planning. 

Lissa / Flickr/CC

The debate over physician-assisted suicide came to the fore in New Hampshire last month when a Concord man asked about it on a national stage. Jim Kinhan, who himself has terminal cancer, asked Hillary Clinton at a Manchester town hall how she would, if elected president, use her executive power to bring attention to the issue. The conversation made news, but the discussion about aid in dying has been ongoing for decades, legalized first in Oregon twenty years ago, and in California just last year. And while only five states in all have passed a law, some in the Granite State hope that New Hampshire will be the sixth. But there is a lot of debate over the risks of allowing the option at all, and two bills seeking to form a study committee on the topic have passed through the legislature, only to be vetoed by Governor Hassan.  However, advocates are hopeful that this year's study committee bill has enough additional detail to pass her desk, and pave the way for a possible legalization bill in a future term.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - March 4, 2016

Mar 4, 2016
Sara Plourde

We're covering the top New Hampshire news stories of the week.

We're talking with the author of a new book on the unlikely ways in which inventors think up groundbreaking ideas.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We'll look at the results from the many states that voted yesterday - from Alaska to Massachusetts - and how it all affects the presidential nomination process that began just a month ago in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Addressing N.H.'s Addiction Counselor Shortage

Mar 1, 2016
Phoenix House Academy of Dublin / Flickr/CC

As overdose deaths skyrocket,  there's been a statewide call for more access to drug treatment, and more funding for it.  But treatment centers are scrambling to find and keep enough trained staff to meet the demand.  Chronic issues, such as low pay and bureaucracy add to the burden of helping a patient through recovery.

N.H. Voter Rules and Residency Requirements

Feb 29, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

A video claiming to reveal fraud on primary day has re-energized calls for voters to spend a certain amount of time living here before casting a ballot.  But the devil's in the details; such as how long is long enough, how to verify someone's identity and address, and the difference between "domicile" and "residency."

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - February 26, 2016

Feb 26, 2016
Sara Plourde

We're covering the top news stories of the week: at a Manchester event this week, Governor Hassan and Uber executives urge lawmakers to pass statewide regulations for the company's drivers, Governor Hassan's nominee for state banking commissioner faces criticism, and the final tally of ballots cast in this month's presidential primary shows a record turnout.

In his new book, Dead Presidents, NHPR's Brady Carlson unearths the offbeat and wacky ways we've memorialized our Commanders-in-Chief, from a laxative drink called Garfield tea to a game called Hooverball.

security newspaper / Flickr/CC

Following the San Bernadino shooting, the FBI has scrambled to learn as much about the crime as possible. But Apple's refusal to help the bureau unlock one of the shooter's iPhones has stoked the national conversation about the role that tech companies play in national security, and the boundaries of how far law enforcement can probe.

Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin

Feb 23, 2016
majjed2008 / Flickr/CC

While many observers see Vladimir Putin as a 'man from nowhere' without a face, substance, or soul, our guest today argues that he has had a number of personas over time. His public relations team has pitched him as everything from 'outsider' to 'history man' to suit the historical moment. Understanding these personalties, she argues, is key to making policy decisions about Russia.

Guest:

Allegra Boverman / Flickr/CC

It's been quiet in the Granite State now that the candidates have moved on, but elsewhere the race has only grown more heated. This weekend we're seeing this play out in South Carolina and Nevada, where minority and military voters play a bigger role.  We'll discuss the weekend's results and what they might mean for future contests.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - February 19, 2016

Feb 19, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top news stories of the week: the Statehouse had a busy week ahead of its February recess, the Fish and Game Commission narrowly voted to allow a bobcat hunt, and, on a frigid Sunday, passengers stranded for several hours were rescued from a stalled tram on Cannon Mountain.

Florida Memory / Flickr/CC

Although Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire's primary by a landslide, he lags behind on so-called super delegates, who have already committed to Clinton. That raises questions among some about just how democratic the Democratic party is. Meanwhile, the Republican party has its own nominating process -- and challenges.

N.H. Debates Federal Real ID Licenses

Feb 17, 2016
Lisa Bongiorno / Flickr/CC

After 10 years of waivers, House lawmakers have approved a bill aimed at complying with the federal Real ID program, which tries to make state-issued drivers licenses more trustworthy and secure.   Real ID stems from the 9-11 attacks, after several of the hijackers were able to board planes using fraudulent state-drivers licenses.

Bobcat Debate: Should Hunting Resume in N.H.?

Feb 16, 2016
National Park Service via flickr/CC

While most states allow bobcat hunting, New Hampshire has not since 1989, when the animal's population had dwindled to dangerously low levels. Now this week, the Fish and Game Commission will vote whether to allow a limited annual hunt of 50 bobcats. We examine what's driving the support and the opposition, which has been fierce, and how this debate exposes broader cultural divides. 

NHPR

GUESTS: 

Jeff L / Flickr/CC

Even as this feud was still going on, back in the summer of 2014, experts on labor unions, corporate governance, and employee culture were noting just how unprecedented the boycott was. Now, there's a new book and a forthcoming film examining this epic battle and exploring its ramifications.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - February 12, 2016

Feb 12, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top news stories of the week: decisive wins for anti-establishment candidates Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump in the First in the Nation primary, state lawmakers consider Medicaid expansion and expanding gambling, and maple syrup season starts early due to warm temperatures earlier this winter.

silvaer / Flickr/CC

After years of headlines on the ‘obesity epidemic’, the number of Americans dealing with this condition is leveling off. Awareness has increased, nutrition improved, and programs have been put in place, but it remains a stubborn problem, with research showing connections to less-recognized issues like poverty, race, and stigma.

  This program originally aired on 11/2/15.

GUESTS:

New Hampshire Primary 2016: Recapping the Results

Feb 10, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Last night, the Granite State gave solid victories to Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republican Donald Trump, with John Kasich grabbing a coveted second place the GOP side.  We'll review the results, and what might be next as the candidates pack up their Granite State gear and head to contests elsewhere in the country.

News Media and the 2016 Election Cycle

Feb 9, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The news media is often seen as a troubled industry, with newspaper circulation and local reporting on the decline, and a continued rocky transition to a digital and mobile world.  We'll re-examine how this trend is playing out nationally and in New Hampshire, especially in the midst of a tumultuous primary election.

woodfin / Flickr/CC

The New Hampshire presidential primary celebrates its 100th birthday next year, and a new book chronicles those many decades, including lots of primary lore. It also examines whether the first primary really has as much power over the nomination process as many believe it to.

  This program was originally broadcast on 9/3/15.

GUESTS:

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - February 5, 2015

Feb 5, 2016
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

We'll be talking about the top news stories of the week: the presidential primary parade arrives, a bit smaller, after several candidates drop out of the race, Governor Hassan delivers her last State of the State address, with her U.S. Senate run in the wings, and an overflow crowd attends a public hearing on whether to resume bobcat hunting

NASA

It's our Sky Guys: the hunt for 'planet nine' continues, with evidence of a huge, but unseen mass beyond Pluto. The mars rover Opportunity celebrates its twelfth birthday, exploring the red planet long beyond expectations.  And this week, it's your best chance to see Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Mars, and Jupiter lined up across the early morning sky.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

As the sunset for New Hampshire's Medicaid expansion approaches, state legislators are debating how best, or whether, to extend the program. And while the prospect of dropping 47,000 Granite Staters who receive this coverage is daunting, some lawmakers are worried about how to fund it when federal support decreases.

Dustin Oliver / Flickr/CC

After months of following campaigns, polls upon polls, and debates, voters in the Hawkeye State finally have their say -- with the Iowa caucuses officially launching the presidential nomination process. We'll discuss the results and how they might affect our First in the Nation Primary, just a week away.

Primary 2016: Tax Policy on the Campaign Trail

Feb 1, 2016
Ken Teegardin / Flickr/CC

The Presidential candidates have proposed major changes -- from replacing the income tax with a national sales tax, to raising taxes to fund universal health care. We’ll dive into the differences and discuss what new tax policies could mean for you.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - January 29, 2015

Jan 29, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top news stories of the week: Republican lawmakers outline a plan to continue Medicaid expansion that includes a work requirement, the House considers decriminalizing possession of small amounts of marijuana, and on the presidential front, the Granite State is relatively quiet with the Iowa caucuses days away.

USDA / Flickr/CC

As stricter nutrition regulations go into their fifth year, some New Hampshire students and schools, continue to push back against these federal guidelines to make meals healthier.  But the rules have many supporters too who say that serving food with less sodium, fat, and calories is a necessity in an era of childhood obesity.

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