The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 8 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on iTunes, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 9/26 - Sustainability or Green-washing?

Tuesday, 9/27 - Conversations with the Candidates: U.S. Senate Candidate  and N.H. Governor Maggie Hassan

Wednesday, 9/28 -  N.H. Author Paul Levy on His Search for His Uncle Phil, Killed in WWII

Thursday, 9/29 - Our Sky Guys with the Latest in Astronomy and Space

Friday, 9/30 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - July 1, 2016

Jul 1, 2016

In New Hampshire headlines this week, the Executive Council approves state funding for Planned Parenthood, with support from Republican candidate for governor Chris Sununu.  Donald Trump returns to N.H.  And crowds turn out at Rye Beach to watch biologists conduct a necropsy to figure out what caused the death of a beached whale nicknamed Snowplow.  

The Sky Guys: Juno, Jupiter and the Milky Way

Jun 30, 2016

We're checking in with the Sky Guys this week for the latest news on the Juno mission to Jupiter, why eighty percent of Americans can no longer see the Milky Way, and gravitational ripples confirmed for a second time.   Plus, what to look for in the stars for summer nights ahead.

 


Wendy Nelson / Flickr/CC

We're talking with millennials from the state for an update on whether and why more young adults are leaving the New Hampshire than coming to it, and what it means for the economy.

  This program was originally broadcast on 3/10/16.

  

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Laura Knoy took NHPR's flagship show on the road for a special live edition of The Exchange, featuring a conversation on business and sustainability. The forum took place on Tuesday, June 28th at Labelle Winery in Amherst, and tackled the tough questions facing many in New Hampshire around what's real and what's "greenwashing," and what policies and economic factors stand in the way of more businesses embracing sustainable practices.

GUESTS:

Jake / Flickr/CC

This week’s ‘Brexit’ – Britain’s high-profile vote to exit from the European Union – may shake up the European economy and politics for years to come. Here in the Granite State, though, there’s still uncertainty about what the impact will be.

N.H. Braces for Economic Fallout from Brexit

Jun 28, 2016
colln suprenant via FLICKR/cc

As Europe struggles to sort out what Britain's decision to leave the European Union means for the Continent, here in the United States there are impacts as well.  We'll explore how this European shake-out might affect the economy in New Hampshire and New England -- from manufacturing to finance to tourism

Read a summary of the conversation here.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - June 24, 2016

Jun 23, 2016
Sara Plourde

We're following up on the top news stories of the week: gun control legislation and politics in Washington D.C. and in N.H., both political parties in N.H. tout fundraising numbers, and Donald Trump fires beleaguered campaign manager Corey Lewandowski.


An Update on the Syrian Conflict and ISIS

Jun 23, 2016

With ISIS in the headlines in this country after the Orlando massacre, we turn our attention to the civil war in Syria. Despite a major victory against ISIS this week when Iraqi forces took back Fallujah, there remains significant debate about what the US role should be in defeating ISIS, as well as ending Syria's civil war. We also discuss a recent  state department memo critical of the focus of US attacks on ISIS, and calling for strikes against Syrian president Assad. 


We talk with Colin Woodard, author of "American Character."  In his new book, Woodard examines the history to the key American question:  how best to reconcile individual liberty with the common good.  Woodard contends this struggle can be linked to nearly every major disagreement in U.S. history right up to and including the present political divisiveness.  Woodard also suggests how to balance these competing ideals and break political deadlock. 


N.H. Elections 2016: The Race for U.S Congress

Jun 21, 2016
Kevin Flynn for NHPR

We check in on  the races for seats in both the U.S. Senate and House, taking  stock of who the candidates are in each race, and which incumbents may be facing strong challenges. We also look at what issues might define the upcoming months of campaigning here in New Hampshire, including the opioid crisis and gun control.


Charles Wheelan on What Money Is and Why It Matters

Jun 17, 2016
alisonbowden14 / Flickr/CC

In his new book, economist Charles Wheelan untangles our complex monetary and banking systems, and why they've veered toward disaster at multiple points throughout our history.  Wheelan also highlights the role individuals, as well a financial institutions, have played in spurring economic prosperity and adversity.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup - June 16, 2016

Jun 17, 2016

We're following up on the top news stories of the week: during a speech at St. Anselm College, Donald Trump renews his call for a temporary ban on Muslim immigrants in response to the massacre in Florida; a final flurry of candidates makes it official as the filing period comes to a close; and in a special session, lawmakers reconsider a measure to help law enforcement officials target drug dealers.

GUESTS:

The Naturalist: Theodore Roosevelt

Jun 16, 2016

No U.S. president is more associated with nature and wildlife than Teddy Roosevelt... hunter, adventurer, and conservationist.  We'll sit down with Darrin Lunde, the author of a new book on our twenty-sixth president,  delving into his early interest in "museum naturalism" and how his legacy resonates today.  

This program was hosted by Dean Spiliotes, Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at Southern New Hampshire University.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Eight New Hampshire senators have announced they'll be moving on -- some to other offices, some back to private life.  We'll sit down with four of them, looking back at the accomplishments and challenges of their tenure and discussing how New Hampshire politics and the legislature has changed over the years.

This program was hosted by Dean Spiliotes, Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at Southern New Hampshire University.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

We ask a question NPR member stations around the country are exploring this week as part of the series, A Nation Engaged: Does My Vote Matter?  We get a Granite State perspective, including on our First in the Nation status and a recent proposal to possibly pair our primary with Massachusetts.  We'll also look at presidential politics in the wake of the Orlando shootings and a visit to New Hampshire by Republican Donald Trump. 

This program was hosted by Dean Spiliotes, Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at Southern New Hampshire University.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - June 10, 2016

Jun 10, 2016
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

This week in NH News: the official filing period for the fall elections ends, Governor Hassan signs several more bills into law, and Laconia's Bike Week begins.


k2parn / Flickr/CC

With its 'lily-white' reputation, the Granite State doesn't often highlight the role that people of color have played throughout its history. A new documentary aims to reveal those hidden stories though, and their importance to the state's history. 


Producer Retailer Magazine via FLICKR/CC

After many years of debate, the federal Food Safety Modernization Act is finally coming to local farms and producers. The goal is to reduce outbreaks of food-borne illnesses such as Salmonella or Listeria. We'll find out how it aims to do that and what it might mean for farmers in New Hampshire.

Michael Garcia Novak / Flickr/CC

Even with all the angst about mid-life crises, and birthday cards calling you over the hill, the author says the middle years are most often about renewal. Today we're talking with former NPR correspondent Barbara Bradley Hagerty on what she discovered about middle age in America.

NPR's Tom Gjelten on America's Immigration Story

Jun 6, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Longtime NPR foreign correspondent Tom Gjelten writes that for most of our history, immigration law favored Europeans. But with the 1965 Immigration Act, the door was opened for people from all corners of the world, ushering in transformation, tensions and a new debate over what it means to be American.

What it Takes to Overcome Addiction in N.H.

Jun 6, 2016
BFD Lt / flickr/cc

We kick off the Morning Edition series, Hope on the Front Lines, examining the many efforts around the state helping people overcome addiction.  We'll look at the array of approaches available in the state including new medicines that curb drug cravings as well as others that revive overdose victims.  Recovery coaches, counselors and doctors are also involved on the the long road to full recovery. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup - June 3, 2016

Jun 3, 2016

This week in NH News: The official filing period for the fall elections begins, as contenders line up to put their names in for federal and state offices.  One thousand bills later, state lawmakers wrap up their session with decisions on proposals from voting requirements to opioid addiction. And the N.H. Forest Society is dealt a blow in its lawsuit to block the Northern Pass Project.  


Debating the Future of Social Security

Jun 2, 2016
Ask Wiki / Flickr/CC

The federal insurance program for the retired and disabled has been a hot political topic in the past. This election season, though, candidates have rarely discussed how to deal with an expected shortfall.  We'll hear the views from two national experts who are here in New Hampshire this week raising awareness of the program's challenges and offering differing solutions. 


Casey McDermott / NHPR

All this week, NHPR is looking at how New Hampshire schools are rethinking the role they play in the lives of their students and their communities.  More students are arriving preoccupied with hunger, homelessness, and other family crises.  Teachers are on the front lines, trying to fill basic needs before the learning begins. Schools are cobbling together their own system of social services in the face of the state’s heroin crisis, the aftermath of the recession, and struggling local economies.  


Water Contamination in N.H. Addressing PFOA

May 31, 2016
florianhuag / Flickr/CC

With new guidance from EPA on how much of the chemical is too much, and a lawsuit against the plastics plant that is its source, many Granite Staters are glad to see more action around the contamination. But others are still worried: both that the damage is already done, and that there's not enough assurance that it won't happen again.


Michal Przedlacki / Flickr/CC

The tragic killing of Charlie Sennott's colleague, New Hampshire native James Foley, was the first exposure for most Americans to ISIS, and a turning point for news organizations who send journalists to the front lines.  We speak with Sennott about his latest initiative to train a new generation of international correspondents in the digital age.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - May 27, 2016

May 26, 2016

We'll be discussing the recent class action lawsuits by residents with private wells near the Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics plant in Merrimack.  Saint-Gobain is the likely source of water contamination in the area, according to state officials.  With  bipartisan fanfare, New Hampshire launches the first statewide initiative of a national campaign called Change Direction, promoting more open discussion of mental illness.   Plus, the legislature winds up it's session with negotiation on issues from police body cameras to mandatory minimum sentences to short-term rentals like AirBNB.

stevendepolo / flickr.com

We think we know all about vitamins, but according to author Catherine Price, most of us know nothing about these thirteen invisible chemicals.  Over the century since they were discovered, vitamins have changed human destiny by preventing and curing many diseases.  Price's "Vitamania" points out that these micronutrients have also taken on a life of their own in the hands of marketers, affecting how we think about health, and the decisions we make about what we eat.


tinafranklindg / flickr cc

We examine several key indicators and their impact on the Granite state.  One is rising inflation.  Another is consumer debt:  Americans are spending more, but we're also borrowing -- to the tune of nearly one trillion dollars.  Also, a new report finds a worrisome trend: business formation in small towns and rural counties has dropped dramatically.

Casey McDermott / NHPR

State leaders recently joined the medical and mental health community to launch  "Change Direction NH," part of a national initiative to raise awareness of mental health disorders and  eliminate the stigma around these issues.  Long considered an afterthought to physical well being, mental health has gained recognition as having equal importance, although it's still not easy for many to discuss or seek help. Change Direction NH attempts to fix that, promoting awareness of the signs of mental illness.  Still, challenges remain, including access to treatment.  


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