The Exchange

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. NHPR listeners have a daily forum to discuss important issues and speak directly with elected officials.
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This week on The Exchange:

Monday, 7/6: Higher Ed Crisis?: What You Need to Know

Tuesday, 7/7: Classroom Safety: The Debate over Child Restraint

Wednesday, 7/8: Supreme Court Decisions

Thursday, 7/9: Driverless Cars

Friday, 7/10: Friday N.H. News Roundup

http://books.simonandschuster.com/Foreign-Correspondent/H-D-S-Greenway/9781476761329

We get the scoop on H.D.S. Greenway’s fifty years as a correspondent covering conflicts -- from Vietnam to the Balkans, Pakistan to Gaza, and Iraq to Afghanistan.  Greenway’s new memoir includes many larger-than-life tales, including shouting his stories over patchy phone lines to get the news out and suffering shrapnel wounds during the Tet Offensive.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - February 27, 2015

Feb 27, 2015

A look at the biggest New Hampshire news of the week: political heavyweights Vice President Joe Biden and Senator Marco Rubio descend on the Granite State. Anthem reveals that more than six hundred thousand New Hampshire customers were affected by the recent data hack. And the Associated Press explores the impact of declining federal funding for the state’s roads.

GUESTS:

uniinnsbruck / Flickr/CC

As the number of teaching positions filled by non-tenure track, often part-time ‘adjunct professors’ has increased, this group gains attention for what it describes as low pay, few benefits, and lack of job security. But with tough financial times at higher ed institutions across the country, schools say there’s just not enough money.

This show was guest-hosted by Brady Carlson.

GUESTS:

Democratic Party Dynamics Heading Into 2016

Feb 25, 2015
DonkeyHotey / Flickr/CC

Although attention has been focused on the GOP field of presidential hopefuls, there are also interesting developments among Democrats, including unflagging efforts among progressives to convince the seemingly unmoved Senator Elizabeth Warren to run.  We’ll look at these dynamics in the context of policy debates within the party.

GUESTS:

U.S.-Iran Relations And The Nuclear Negotiations

Feb 24, 2015
U.S. Department of State / Flickr/CC

After years of diplomatic false-starts, a deal over Iran’s nuclear program may finally be in sight. But as negotiators race to reach agreement by the end of March deadline, domestic politics, international relations, and a long history of mistrust threaten to derail what many see as a last best chance for a diplomatic solution.

GUESTS:

Rethinking Redistricting

Feb 23, 2015
Andy Proehl / Flickr/CC

The U.S. census every ten years redistributes Congressional seats based on population changes.  While it may seem inevitable that this process would favor whichever party is in power, redistricting has been used over the years to stack the political deck. Some say this is harming the democratic process and that reform is in order.

GUEST:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - February 20, 2015

Feb 20, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top stories of the week: lawmakers return to the perennial debate around casino gambling in the state, a house bill would bring New Hampshire into line with the rest of New England in decriminalizing marijuana possession, and the Mount Washington summit records the world’s second coldest temperatures.

GUESTS:

Reporter Dan Balz and columnist E.J. Dionne are in the state for an award ceremony at UNH Law.  We’ll get their thoughts on how political coverage has changed, especially of events such as the New Hampshire primary, but also what they hope won’t change in terms of ethics and standards.

GUEST:

New Hampshire Debates Body Cameras For Police

Feb 18, 2015
West Midlands Police / Flickr/CC

The national conversation over police use of force sparked by the deaths of unarmed suspects in Ferguson and New York City has been marked by unrest and divisive politics. But in the midst of this polarized debate, there is one change that nearly everyone agrees on: the need for more body cameras worn by police officers. Before the new technology is widely adopted though, questions of privacy, effectiveness, and cost will have to be addressed.

GUESTS:

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We'll sit down with Governor Hassan to discuss her budget for the next biennium, the current legislature, and her goals for the next two years.

GUEST:

  • Maggie Hassan - New Hampshire Governor Maggie Hassan, a democrat in her second term.  She’s also a former state senator from Exeter, and a former Senate Majority Leader.

Harold Holzer's 'Lincoln And The Power Of The Press'

Feb 17, 2015
haroldholzer.com

Abraham Lincoln is most often remembered for preserving the Union, abolishing slavery, and his untimely death. But—a less- documented aspect of Honest Abe’s legacy, according to scholar Harold Holzer, was the extent of his involvement with the press, which, at the time, was coming into its own as a strong, partisan force in shaping public opinion.

This program was originally broadcast on 11/12/14.

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - February 13, 2015

Feb 13, 2015
Sara Plourde

The top story of the week, of course, is Governor Hassan’s budget address.  Her proposed spending increases include kindergarten through college education, mental health, corrections, and rail.  The governor also seek more revenue from tobacco taxes, vehicle registrations, and government consolidation. We'll talk about that, as well as some other headlines of the week.

GUESTS:

A new book by UNH historian Jason Sokol describes what he calls the region’s 'conflicted soul’ when it comes to race. Sokol explores the discrepancies between the North’s image as haven from the segregated south, and the harsh realities that African Americans faced in black neighborhoods from Boston to Brooklyn.

GUESTS:

Melissa Moreno / Flickr/CC

New Hampshire has been engaged in a perennial argument about the state’s role in paying for schools. In 2011, a compromise put that debate on hold. But dissatisfaction has been brewing and now a bipartisan bill would tweak the formula, igniting speculation about who would win and who would lose under a new arrangement.

GUESTS:

George Lane / Flickr/CC

A new report finds that extending train service from Boston to Manchester could provide big benefits: more jobs, higher property values, and enhancing the state’s overall attractiveness. Still, skeptics doubt the numbers, both in terms of the number of people who would get on board and how much money it would cost.

GUESTS:

22860 / Flickr/CC

With a new bill addressing how Granite Staters are allowed to carry a concealed gun, many are tapping in to the perennial conversation about concealed versus open carry. And while the right to bear arms is well-established in New Hampshire, there’s still debate about the who, where, and how when it comes to firearms.

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - February 6, 2015

Feb 6, 2015
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

We're following the top stories of the week: lawmakers engage in a new debate over an old issue: the state’s role in funding public education.  A house bill would require all state police officers to wear body cameras when interacting with the public. And a new commuter rail study says “sorry Concord,” recommending train service from Boston to Manchester.

GUESTS:

Southern N.H. Debates Natural Gas Pipeline Proposal

Feb 5, 2015
Kinder Morgan

With high energy costs and inadequate means for transporting natural gas into the region, some are championing construction of an interstate pipeline spanning eighty miles and seventeen communities in New Hampshire’s southern region.  But opposition is fierce among those concerned about environmental impact and property values.

GUESTS:

Joe Gall / Flickr/CC

We're looking at some of the top recent political headline in our monthly check-in with Political Junkie Ken Rudin: congressional Republicans flexing their newfound political muscles, challenging the White House on immigration, health care, and foreign policy, and Mitt Romney bows out of the presidential race, leaving supporters with a long list of alternatives.

S P Photography / Flickr/CC

More children these days are living with Grandma and Grandpa, due to factors including incarceration, drug abuse, underemployment, and single parenthood.  We’ll find out how these grandparents become primary caregivers of their grandchildren, and the challenges they face, including housing, health, financial and legal issues.

GUESTS:

The 'Sharing Economy': Uber & Airbnb Come To N.H.

Feb 2, 2015
Dr sanjeevkumar SinghEr / Flickr/CC

With the rise of services like Uber and Airbnb, more folks who would normally use city-regulated taxis or hotels are now using apps to connect with strangers for a ride or a place to stay. But while this new ‘sharing’ configuration may be cheaper and more efficient, some worry about safety, fairness, and the future of work.

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - January 30, 2015

Jan 30, 2015
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

We're looking at some of the top stories of the week: Granite Staters mop up from the storm, with many saying it wasn’t as bad as it could have been, the State receives 14 applications from those hoping to run medical marijuana dispensaries,  a new bill is filed on voter residency requirements, and Fish and Game debates drones and other technology in hunting.

GUESTS:

Big Dig 2? The Debate Over Boston's 2024 Olympic Bid

Jan 29, 2015
Shawn Carpenter / Flickr/CC

There’s been celebration but also consternation among Bostonians, since their city was chosen as the U.S. candidate to host the twenty-twenty-fours summer games. Boosters foresee economic growth, while opponents warn of logistical and financial nightmares.  Meanwhile, Granite Staters are wondering what’s in it for them.

GUESTS:

Josh Davis / Flickr/CC

You hear a lot of grumbling these days that students and teachers are overwhelmed by testing regimes aimed at keeping districts accountable.  We talk with an author who says there are better ways to track of how are kids and educators are doing.

GUEST:

The Battle To Save The Bats

Jan 27, 2015
Marek Stefunko / Flickr/CC

First the latest on impacts of the severe weather we’re seeing in the region, from roads to the power grid. Then, the battle to save the bats: we're talking with a UNH researcher about signs of resilience among bats, devastated by white-nose syndrome, and new findings about their immune systems that could lead to treatments for some human diseases.

GUESTS:

Immigration Impasse: The Future Of Reform

Jan 26, 2015
Jerry Schmidt / Flickr/CC

Late last year, President Obama issued sweeping directives for allowing a certain group of undocumented immigrants to remain here without fear of deportation. On Capitol Hill, opposition is fierce among Republicans, who are now coming up with ways to undo these actions.  We’ll find out more, including impacts in the Granite State.

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - January 23, 2015

Jan 23, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We’re talking about the top news stories of the week: lawmakers start to dig into this year’s bills on subjects from out-of-state health insurance to mandatory paid sick leave, Health and Human Services officials unveil a huge shortfall, and hundreds rally at the Statehouse for campaign finance reform.

GUESTS:

  • Jeff Feingold – editor of the New Hampshire Business Review
  • Josh Rogers – senior political reporter for NHPR

CALLOUTS:

az / Flickr/CC

A new report urges New Hampshire schools to improve science, technology, engineering, and math education. It’s part of a national preoccupation stemming from lackluster scores on these subjects among American students. But some say this emphasis is edging out other, equally important areas from writing skills to civics to the arts.

GUESTS:

Federal Debt: How Worried Should We Be?

Jan 21, 2015
Valerio Luise / Flickr/CC

Although the debt debate has receded, some keeping a close eye on the issue continue to advocate for urgent measures to address what they see as an ever-looming problem. But others say those fears are overblown and that the priority should be economic investment and boosting the middle class.

GUESTS:

OversightAndReform / Flickr/CC

The Governor has set aside what was to be called “Green Mountain Care”: an attempt to be the first state with its own single-payer health system that gained national attention.  But the plan unraveled at the end of last year, largely due to the costs involved.  We’ll find out what happened and what might be next.

GUESTS:

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