The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

Want to leave us a message? Call this number anytime: 202.649.0835

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 11/20 -  Competency-Based Education

Tuesday, 11/21 - 1000 Conversations and Communicating with People Outside of Your Circle

Wednesday, 11/22 - Exploring Animal Behavior

Thursday, 11/23 - Special Programming on The Science of Gratitude

Friday, 11/24 -  Rebroadcast: Is Seaweed the New Superfood?

Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jennifer A. Villalovos; U.S. Navy

 The Manchester VA Medical Center is under investigation after a scathing report by the Boston Globe's Spotlight team  revealed allegations by medical staff of seriously substandard care at the facility. Among the conditions described in the report: an operating room infested with flies, veterans with crippling spinal damage that might have been prevented, and obsolete surgical instruments. We look into what happened, and how these problems fit into a broader picture of trouble with the Veterans Administration.  

Eddie Cheuk

New Hampshire's Attorney General Gordon MacDonald recently announced a criminal investigation into sexual assault allegations at St. Paul's School, in Concord. We discussed recent local stories involving private schools such as St. Paul's, as well as the broader culture in elite boarding schools that may contribute to this issue.  And we talked with a N.H. lawmaker who says she'll be working on changing laws to better protect victims of sexual violence.  


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State Senate candidates David Boutin, Republican and former state Senator, Kevin Cavanaugh, Democrat and Manchester alderman, and Jason Dubrow, a Libertarian active in town government in Dunbarton, joined The Exchange to discuss issues important to New Hampshire voters. Voting takes place on July 25. 

Tracy Lee Carroll; NHPR

We're talking with the three candidates who want to be the next state senator from District 16. The issues they're talking about impact all of the Granite State, including public education, child protection, taxes, and workforce development. 


Skin Cancer: The Latest Research, News, And Advice

Jul 17, 2017
Pixabay.com

New England is not known for its sunny skies, but it is known for high rates of skin cancer. Why are Granite Staters highly vulnerable to this disease, including the most virulent type, melanoma? We'll look at this, and at why there's cause for optimism, particularly when it comes to prevention and a promising treatment, immunotherapy.

This show originally aired on June 1, 2017. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 14, 2017

Jul 14, 2017

New Hampshire's Attorney General opens a criminal investigation into charges of sexual assault at St. Paul's School. Governor Chris Sununu signed a number of bills, including full-day kindergarten funding, a drug interdiction bill, and another tightening the definition of domicile for voting purposes. He also vetoed his first bill, regarding zoning board procedures.  And Grover Norquist, of Americans for Tax Reform, visits the state to talk tax reform and support GOP congressional candidates.


NHPR

In the nearly 20 years since  state the Supreme Court issued its landmark Claremont II decision calling for equal access to an adequate education, significant disparities among communities persist, according to a recent report by the N.H. Center for Public Policy Studies.

Claremont School District v Governor of New Hampshire led to the allocation of additional state money for communities in need, yet these districts still lack sufficient funds from local resources such as property taxes. 

Paying for Public Schools

Jul 12, 2017
NHPR

Almost twenty years after a court ruling that was supposed to radically alter education funding, a new report says not much has changed. And, it says, poor and rural towns could be in for a bigger hit in terms of state dollars in the near future. We'll find out more, including what the report calls a "new education normal."

  

Debating Nuclear Energy: The Promise & Problems

Jul 11, 2017
Jim Richmond; Wikimedia Commons

Nuclear provides about a third of New England's electricity, but that's changing, as old plants in Vermont and Massachusetts shut down.  Still, there's huge debate over whether to build the next generation of nuclear.  Is it a reliable, carbon-free energy source...or is it too dangerous and expensive?


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On The Exchange, Governor Chris Sununu addressed the uproar over the White House request for voter information and defended his decision not to join an alliance set up by states pledging to uphold the Paris Accord on climate change. He reaffirmed his support for the Northern Pass project and called for a "smart portfolio of renewables," including geothermal.  As for the political dimension of these and other debates,  Sununu had this to say: "I do my best to throw politics out." 

Governor Chris Sununu on The Exchange

Jul 7, 2017

Today on The Exchange, Governor Chris Sununu sits down with Laura for the full hour to give his take on several topics, including national health care reform and its possible impact on the Granite State.

Also up for discussion: the state's continuing opioids crisis, including the high number of overdoses in June. And we'll hear from the Governor on so-called "Keno-garten," the expansion of kindergarten with money from the Keno electronic game of chance. 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As N.H. Deputy Secretary of State David Scanlan explained on The Exchange, the voter information requested by the Commission on Election Integrity is already publicly available and has been for about ten years -- though there are laws governing who gets access to that voter information, as well as how it is accessed and used.  For election-law attorney Paul Twomey, the Commission's request, in addition to being politically suspect,  does not fall within that legal framework and could lead to major security risks.  

Both Scanlan and N.H. Secretary of State Bill Gardner have seemed somewhat taken aback by the uproar over the Commission's request. Scanlan places some of the blame on a polarized political climate.  Since our conversation, as NHPR's Casey McDermott reports here, the ACLU has joined with two N.H. lawmakers in suing Gardner over his plans to comply with the Trump Administration's request for voter information.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 7, 2017

Jul 7, 2017

We'll have the latest on the controversy over the request  from the Presidential Commission on Electoral Integrity for voter data from the states.  The American Civil Liberties Union of New Hampshire sues to bar New Hampshire Secretary of State William Gardner from disclosing New Hampshire voter information.  The re-building of I-93 from Manchester to Salem may include a fourth lane, which could also cut five to eight million dollars along the way.  A 14-year-old student raped in a hallway at Manchester High School West in 2015 may sue the school district. And it's a bumper year for strawberries.


The President's Election Integrity Commission's request for state voter checklist information set off lots of concerns about voter privacy. Some states, including Maine, have refused to cooperate.  Others, like New Hampshire, have said they'll comply, but only with information that's already publicly available. 


Incirlik Air Base

For Dr. Gary Sobelson who practices family medicine in Concord a recent study suggesting that people with mental illness consume a disproportionate share of prescription painkillers was concerning but not necessarily surprising.

Incirlik Air Base

A new Dartmouth study finds people with mental illness are much more likely to use opioids, despite the risks these drugs pose especially for these patients. Possible explanations, according to the study: People suffering from depression may feel pain more acutely, prompting empathetic doctors to write more prescriptions.


What to Read Now That It's (Finally) Summer!

Jul 3, 2017
Susan Vaufrey via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/3akZQW

It's been a long time coming, but it's finally summer in New Hampshire!  If that means kicking back with a good book, we have some recommendations to share with you.  From political memoirs to historical novels and nonfiction, there's something for everyone, including the latest from favorite authors Michael Crichton, John Grisham, and Neil Gaiman.

This show originally broadcast on June 21, 2017. 

Sara Plourde for NHPR

New Hampshire has 221 towns, thirteen cities, 1.3 million residents, and countless stories to tell.

But while many of these tales are what you'd expect from a small community-based state, where one person really can make a difference, don't be fooled: Small-town politics can be just as rough as those in the big city, and new ways aren't always greeted kindly.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 30th, 2017

Jun 30, 2017

Governor Sununu and other New Hampshire lawmakers announced their opposition to the proposed healthcare bill from the U.S. Senate.  "Keno-garten" comes to the Granite State, but critics worry the new funding from the electronic gambling game Keno won't be enough for widespread full-day kindergarten programs. And Mayor Ted Gatsas of Manchester announces his re-election campaign, amongst some controversy. 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

N.H. lawmakers Republican Senator Jeb Bradley and Democratic Representative Cindy Rosenwald have worked long and hard, in bipartisan fashion, on health care issues, including Medicaid expansion -- which is why they've been closely watching the national debate surrounding the U.S. Senate's health care bill.

pixabay.com

A New Hampshire take on the national health care debate. As the U.S. Senate works on health care, what's the Granite State view?  Given our own demographics, public health challenges, and politics -   what aspects of health reform are especially important to New Hampshire?


The Humane Society of the United States

Animal cruelty has been in the public eye this year.  About 80 Great Danes were recently rescued at a mansion in Wolfeboro - living in filthy conditions.  Just last week, four horses were taken from a Deering farm, ill and neglected. And in February,  more than 30 Persian cats were found in a Barnstead home, in squalid conditions.  These cases raise questions -- about whether our state laws on breeding and animal cruelty should be tougher, about when neighbors and town officials should step in, and about the psychology of animal hoarding.

Understanding And Preventing Animal Abuse

Jun 27, 2017

The story of Great Danes rescued from a Wolfeboro mansion is just the latest in New Hampshire to raise questions about how and why such extreme situations develop. Should animal breeding laws be tightened? And what are the signs of mental health issues or social isolation that can lead to the hoarding of pets? 


Pixabay.com

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a limited version of President Trump's travel ban this week, saving broader consideration for the fall.  We cover the legal arguments and look at other high-profile high court cases this term, including First Amendment issues on trademarks and hate speech. 


NHPR Flickr

It's been two years this week since New Hampshire's hands-free driving law banning the use of hand-held devices behind the wheel went into effect.

Major Matt Shapiro of the New Hampshire State Police was one of the leaders behind this law, aimed at getting drivers's eyes away from their phones and on the road.  Speaking on The Exchange, Shapiro says there is clear evidence it's working. 

The Dangers of Distracted Driving

Jun 23, 2017
Sadie Colbert; USAF

The start of summer marks the one-hundred deadliest days of driving for teenagers, but young drivers aren't the only high risk people hitting the streets.  It's been two years since the Hands-Free driving law went into effect in New Hampshire, but how much has it improved the safety of our roads? Do we need to go further? 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 23, 2017

Jun 23, 2017

Catch up on this week's stop N.H. stories:  The New Hampshire House and Senate pass an $11.7 billion budget. Despite a Republican majority, GOP leaders had to work hard to pass this spending plan, but it's now on its way to the Governor's desk.  Another fraught issue for both sides of the aisle: a bill funding full-day kindergarten.  And more than 80 Great Dane dogs were rescued from a puppy mill operating out of a mansion in Wolfeboro.

What's Next For Climate Change Efforts in N.H.?

Jun 21, 2017
WPS Geography

President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement set off protests nationwide - with some Governors, cities, and businesses, signing on to their own pledges.  But how much does Paris really matter - to what's already happening in New Hampshire?  We'll sort out the politics from the policy. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 16, 2017

Jun 16, 2017

N.H. House and Senate negotiators reach a deal on the $11.7 billion budget this week but the spending plan is facing pushback from both sides of the aisle ahead of next week's full vote. At a hearing on the Northern Pass project, opponents show up in force. And bears continue to make news in the Granite State. 


Macroscopic Solutions / flickr/cc

We get the latest on N.H. tick populations, health precautions, and research.  2017 is predicted to be a banner year for ticks - meaning more risk for all of us, from Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.  How concerned should we be about Powassan virus?   There is no vaccine for Lyme disease, but biodiversity can help thwart it. And we'll find out about a promising treatment being developed for Lyme.

This show was originally broadcast on May 22, 2017. 


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