The Exchange

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. NHPR listeners have a daily forum to discuss important issues and speak directly with elected officials.
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Next week on The Exchange:

Monday, 8/31: AEI President Arthur Brooks’ ‘The Conservative Heart’

Tuesday, 9/1: New Hampshire Drug Czar John Wozmak

Wednesday, 9/2: Political Junkie Ken Rudin

Thursday, 9/3: N.H. First in the Nation Primary

Friday, 9/4: Friday N.H. News Roundup

The Future Of U.S.-Cuba Relations

Apr 21, 2015
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The thaw that began last year has developed into a warm spell, with a historic sit-down at the Summit of the Americas, removal of Cuba from the terrorism list, and movement toward reopening embassies. We’re sitting down with Cuba expert Peter Kornbluh, on these events and some of the concerns that have come up.

LLudo / Flickr/cc

Like the return of spring crocuses, New Hampshire’s perennial gambling debate is back. Earlier this year, the Senate passed a two-casino bill and sent it to the House, which has been a graveyard for these measures.  We’ll find out if this time will be any different and look at how arguments around economic benefits and social costs have played out in other states.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - April 17, 2015

Apr 17, 2015

State officials move to shut down a special education program at the Lakeview Rehabilitation Center after scathing reports of abuse and neglect and questions about state oversight.  A battle brews in the legislature over cutting business taxes. And after years of decline, there may be some hope for New Hampshire’s moose population.

Walt Otto / Flickr//cc

More than ten years after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, the issue still dominates American foreign policy. We’ll speak with Retired Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, who was there from the beginning, serving as chief of staff to then Secretary of State Colin Powell. We’ll get his thoughts on the factors influencing American decision making in Iraq, including money.

Reconsidering N.H. Sentencing Laws

Apr 15, 2015
Thomas Hawk / Flickr/cc

Decades of a tough-on-crime approach brought mandatory minimum sentences that many now say are too costly – both in social terms and dollars, as prison populations have soared. State lawmakers recently considered removing these for certain nonviolent offenders. But some are urging caution on behalf of public safety.

N.H. Remembers The Holocaust: 70 Years Later

Apr 13, 2015
Benjamin / Flickr/cc

Seventy years after the liberation of Nazi concentration camps, a series of events is occurring this week, remembering the trauma and suffering, and commemorating the millions of lives taken. And organizers say, with rising levels of anti-semitism in Europe, study and remembrance is more important than ever.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - April 10, 2015

Apr 10, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at some of the top stories of the week: the day after becoming the second official presidential candidate, Rand Paul holds a “Stand with Rand” rally in Milford, the state Senate weighs a bill to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana that passed the House by a wide margin, and a Manchester woman wows audiences on Jeopardy and wins big.

The Debate Over Compensation For NCAA Athletes

Apr 8, 2015
Kenny / Flickr/cc

College basketball’s March Madness wraps up this week, but there’s another contest underway: the debate over the status of student athletes. Some argue the NCAA should disperse at least a share of its billions among players. Others though, warn that would prematurely turn college athletes into professionals.

Guests:

Spotlight On The 2016 N.H. House Budget

Apr 7, 2015
Jimmy Emerson, DVM / Flickr/cc

Last week, New Hampshire House Lawmakers sent their plan for state revenues and spending to the Senate.  We’ll dig into what they did –and didn’t do– with two House Finance Committee members.  We’ll also examine some of the rhetoric you might have heard and find out what’s true and what may be a matter of interpretation.

Guests:

frankieleon / Flickr/cc

New Hampshire has among the nation’s highest costs, when it comes to handling on-the-job injuries.  And despite many attempts to address that, worker’s comp is a contentious issue with groups representing health providers, businesses, and employees all having strong feelings about what they might win or lose in a compromise.

Guests:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - April 3, 2015

Apr 3, 2015

A look at the biggest New Hampshire news of the week: House Republicans pass a budget, turning things over to the Senate. Meanwhile outside the Statehouse, three-hundred protestors stage a “die-in” to highlight the rising toll from substance abuse and to call for more state help.  And Manchester’s Currier Museum of Art joins the growing list of galleries nationwide banning the ‘selfie stick.’

Guests:

Kyle Flannery/USFWS / Flickr/CC

A bill proposed by fourth graders from Hampton falls was harshly debated and defeated in the legislature last month, leading to some late-night satire but also a conversation about the best way to get students involved in the democratic process. We’ll look at that and also examine bills this year addressing voter requirements.

GUESTS, VOTER REQUIREMENTS:

Gage Skidmore / Flickr/cc

It's our monthly check in with Political Junkie Ken Rudin. We're covering some of the top political stories of recent weeks including Indiana's controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act, federal budget proposals from congress, and the latest from the presidential field of hopefuls.

  Guest:

Jason Moon / NHPR

Retired General Stanley McChrystal visits New Hampshire this week. We’ll ask him about the situation in Afghanistan, where he was top commander of the international coalition, and get his take on spreading conflicts in the Middle East.  We’ll also find out about his proposal to create a year of national service for young Americans.

GUEST:

Indie Photos / Flickr/CC

New Hampshire officials call it a public health epidemic: record numbers of Granite Staters are overdosing and dying because of opioid drugs, especially heroin.   We’ll find out how this problem grew so quickly, and the state’s responses to it, including a relatively new prescription drug monitoring program.

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - March 27, 2015

Mar 27, 2015

A look at the biggest New Hampshire news of the week: budget battles kick into a higher gear, as the House prepares to vote on final plan. Republican presidential hopefuls continue to spring up, with frequent Granite State visitor Ted Cruz the first to declare candidacy. And an energy bill energizes opposition among solar-power companies concerned about big utilities.

Guests:

Travis Estell / Flickr/cc

Recent proposed cuts to New Hampshire's transportation budget caused outrage in the Statehouse, and even a Republican-backed effort to raise the gas tax. Meanwhile, other states are also struggling to keep up with road and bridge repair, with some trying new ways to pay for infrastructure.

Guests:

Laws limiting where sex-offenders can live have been used in many towns and states aimed at protecting vulnerable populations, especially children. But a growing chorus of critics from police to civil rights attorneys argues these laws are unconstitutional and even counterproductive. We'll look at the options that communities have in dealing with this sensitive issue.

Guests:

Milwaukee Teachers' Education Association / Flickr/cc

Right to Work bills, which are about the power of unions to collect dues, have been debated in New Hampshire many times before. Now, as right to work continues to gain ground around the country, we’ll review the history and the arguments around it, and how New Hampshire fits into the national picture.

Guests:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - March 20, 2015

Mar 20, 2015

A look at the biggest New Hampshire news of the week: the state budget moved front-and-center this week with Republicans and Democrats wrangling over propsed cuts to Health and Human Services, the Department of Transportation, and the state university system. The Department of Corrections is having budget troubles of its own, forcing them to delay construction on a new women's prison in Concord. And the latest from presidential hopefuls in the Granite State including Ted Cruz and Jeb Bush.

Guests:

Spring Book Picks 2015

Mar 19, 2015
Faith Meixell / NHPR

Two local independent booksellers give us their picks for new reads of 2015. Scroll down for a complete list of books mentioned during today's show.

Guests:

Top Picks:

igor kislev / Flickr/CC

Of all the difficult conversations between parents and children, talking about money may be the one parents are the least prepared for. This, despite the constant stream of financial news and data all around us. We talk with New York Times columnist Ron Lieber about where parents should draw the line between educating their children about money and unnecessarily involving them in the financial stress of an adult life.

Guest:

timlewisnm / Flickr/cc

Last week four New Hampshire districts received federal approval to reduce the number of required standardized tests. This pilot program, the first-of-its-kind in the country, will replace most ‘Smarter Balanced’ tests with assessments written by local teachers. In doing so, the hope is to make testing more representative of what students know, and less of a disruption to day-to-day learning.

Guests:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - March 13, 2015

Mar 13, 2015

Voters gather at town meetings to have their annual say on local spending, with many this year, saying “no” to new ventures.  At the Statehouse, lawmakers tackle an enormous array of bills from the minimum wage to marijuana.  And as the snowbanks melt, Presidential candidates are blooming in Granite State.

Guests:

Torben Hansen / Flickr/CC

Under a law passed last year in New Hampshire, people with certain medical conditions can use marijuana. Now, lawmakers are considering decriminalizing possession of small amounts of the drug and studying the legalization question. These debates are sweeping the country, even as the drug remains illegal under federal law.

Guests:

CyberHades / Flicker/CC

A recent breach at insurance giant Anthem compromised the personal information of as many as eighty million Americans including more than six hundred thousand granite-staters. It was just the latest hacking attack of a major company, following Home Depot and Target. We’ll look at why this keeps happening and what protections show promise.

Guests:

Hello World Media / Flickr/CC

We sit down with U.S. diplomat and Islam expert Haroon Ullah to discuss the emergence of ISIS and other terrorist groups. While there is worldwide condemnation of their violence, the U.S. and other nations are struggling with how best to mobilize against them. We’ll explore the roots of this thorny issue and some of the myths that our guest says surround it.

Guest:

Sue Waters / Flickr/CC

This weekend in Manchester, New Hampshire’s own ‘Free State Project’ will hold its yearly convention. We sit down with Liberty Forum speaker David Boaz of the CATO Institute, to check in on this galvanized political movement.

Guest:

  • David Boaz: executive vice president of the Cato Institute. He will speak at the Free State Project's Liberty Forum this weekend. His new book is 'The Libertarian Mind.'

Friday N.H. News Roundup - March 6, 2015

Mar 6, 2015

A look at the biggest New Hampshire news of the week: A flurry of activity in the statehouse with bills aimed at protecting minors from cigarette smoke and tanning beds in motion. Senators sideline a proposal to reopen and expand the Balsams resort. And the House votes for a longer list of illnesses eligible for medical marijuana. Meanwhile in Boston, the trial of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev brings back painful memories.

Guests:

Jamie Gemmiti / Conway Daily Sun

The state has long worked to support people with disabilities in the least restrictive ways as possible, preferably right at home. But a small group still end up in institutions. Now though, one of these facilities is getting a hard look after reports of abuse.  We’ll discuss this system overall and where more oversight might be needed.

GUESTS:

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