The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 8 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. NHPR listeners have a daily forum to discuss important issues and speak directly with elected officials.
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This week on The Exchange:

Monday, 2/8: History of the N.H. Primary

Tuesday, 2/9: The State of News Media & the 2016 Election Cycle

Wednesday, 2/10: Post Primary Wrap-Up

Thursday, 2/11: Rebroadcast

Friday, 2/12: Weekly New Hampshire News Roundup

 

Alexander Sun / Flickr/CC

College Scorecard (9:00):

Two years ago, President Obama announced plans for rating colleges and universities, so students would know whether they were getting a good value.  Now, the administration has released its College Scorecard, and students and families are deciding how best to use it.

Papist / Flickr/CC

Since his selection, there’s been intense interest in Pope Francis’s leadership, among Catholics and non-Catholics.  And that interest is growing, as he now heads to the U.S. with a packed schedule that includes an unprecedented Congressional address….and a tendency to tackle politically charged issues, from capitalism to climate change.  

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - September 18, 2015

Sep 18, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top stories of the week: after months of stalemate, lawmakers hammer out a compromise budget agreement and the Governor signs it into law. A leading New Hampshire business group names affordable housing as the biggest challenge facing employers. And an emu on the loose in Bow evades capture while captivating public attention.

Guests:

Top N.H. Lawmakers Discuss Bipartisan Budget Deal

Sep 17, 2015
NHPR

After months of stalemate, top lawmakers and the Governor crafted a compromise that splits the difference on the contested issue of business tax cuts.  We’re talking with Statehouse leaders about this hard-won deal, how rank-and-file members reacted, and what might be next.  

GUESTS:

Syrian Refugee Crisis: N.H. Reacts

Sep 15, 2015
DFID - UK Department for International Development / Flickr/CC

As migrants from Syria and other countries pour into Europe, President Obama says the United States will take ten thousand. And so Americans are watching and considering our own capacity to take in refugees, and other ways to address the root problems that are driving so many people out their home countries.

GUESTS:

matt2181 / Flickr/CC

This primary season, much of the attention has focused on the Republican side, given the many candidates and another upcoming debate.  But this weekend in New Hampshire, it’s the Democrats’ turn: at their annual state convention, the party’s presidential contenders are all expected.  We’ll look at the candidates and the issues.

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - September 11, 2015

Sep 11, 2015

We're looking at the top news stories of the week: Executive Councilor Chris Sununu declares his intention to run for governor, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders continues to pull ahead of Hillary Clinton in state polls, and the city of Franklin reinstates a curfew for kids under 16.

GUESTS:

  • Dan Barrick
  • Garry Rayno
  • Dean Spiliotes
NHPR / Michael Brindley

On Sept. 11, 2001, The Exchange held a special call-in program in the afternoon. Laura Knoy hosted and was joined by Jon Greenberg. Former 2nd District Congressman Charlie Bass called into the program, saying, "This is the event we feared the most." We've pulled the audio from our archives.

aciamax / Flickr/CC

After this summer’s rape trial ended in conviction of a former St. Paul’s student on several counts, many educators and parents are taking stock of teachable moments: do teenagers understand the concept of consent, how does media influence their thinking, how can they protect themselves and others. We’ll look at how well we prepare our youth for these situations.

GUESTS:

Vaping360 / Flickr/CC

Despite claims by the industry that e-cigarettes are healthier than traditional smoking, more research is raising questions about this alternative, including its rising use by teenagers. But vaping has caught on, with more shops opening and many ex-smokers who say vaping helped them quit tobacco.

GUESTS:

Cities and Counties Take Action on Minimum Wage

Sep 8, 2015
Pyogenes Gruffer / Flickr/CC

Recently, cities and counties have taken the lead on mandating much higher pay for traditional low-wage jobs, instead of waiting for the states or the federal government.  Supporters say these increases are long overdue and only fair, but others warn of unintended consequences, including job losses and cutbacks in hours.

 Guests:

Army Medicine / Flickr CC

Whether they have insurance or not, many Americans have trouble affording dental care. This leaves many adults -and children- forgoing needed dental care that leads to bigger health problems down the road. But  medical research and many doctors are promoting the idea that insurance for oral health should not be separated from general health insurance, setting the stage for potential reforms to the way we treat the health of our teeth.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - September 4, 2015

Sep 4, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top stories of the week:  a legal battle heats up over the release of police body-camera footage of a fatal shooting, the state’s sex offender laws come under scrutiny following the verdict in the St. Paul’s rape trial, and the Northern Pass debate comes to central New Hampshire, with Concord residents asking why more lines can’t be buried.

iprimages / Flickr/CC

While Donald Trump continues to dominate on the GOP side of the presidential primary race, Carly Fiorina and Ben Carson make substantial gains in Iowa. Meanwhile, Democratic front-runner Hilary Clinton appears to lose her stride, with more liberals around the country ‘feeling the Bern.’ And President Obama heads to Alaska to talk climate change. 

Guest:

Josh Rogers / NHPR

Since appointed by Governor Hassan to lead the fight against an epidemic of heroin and opioid abuse, Wozmak has faced some political pushback and a budget impasse. We’ll talk with him about that and hear his plan for marshaling the state’s resources to tackle drug abuse and overdose deaths.

GUEST:

  • Jack Wozmak – New Hampshire’s senior director of Substance Misuse and Behavioral Health for the Governor’s Office, also known as the state’s ‘drug czar.’
     

We’re talking with Arthur Brooks, prominent conservative and president of the American Enterprise Institute. In his new book, he says that conservatism has for too long been a movement of the head instead of the heart. The book also includes his blueprint for a more prosperous America, and his social justice agenda for what he calls the New Right.

GUESTS:

  • Arthur Brooks – president of the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C.
Tiger Pixel / Flickr / Creative Commons

What began as a pet project for computer programmers and digital-privacy activists is today a financial technology worth billions of dollars. Author Nathaniel Popper takes us behind the scenes of that dramatic transformation and looks ahead at how this digital currency could shape the global economy of the future.

Andreas Levers / Flickr/cc

Roughly seventeen million Americans suffer from alcoholism, making it the country’s most prevalent addiction. We’ll look at efforts in New Hampshire to address this. Plus, we’ll hear from critics and supporters of the most commonly prescribed approach to treating the disease, Alcoholics Anonymous.

Elizabeth / Flickr/CC

After allowing their six and ten year old children to walk a mile home by themselves, a Maryland couple are fighting accusations of child neglect. The case has inflamed a familiar argument over how much supervision and independence children need. We’ll look behind the clichés and get the range of views on free-range parenting.

Morgan / Flickr/CC

Less Medicine, More Health. That’s the contradictory-sounding title of a new book by Dartmouth researcher and Doctor Gilbert Welch. It’s a challenge to the conventional wisdom among patients and providers that more testing and more treatment is always better.  Welch says in some cases, you can have too much health care – and can even be harmed by it.

Assessing Greek Life On College Campuses

Aug 24, 2015
Tbass Effendi / Flickr/cc

Fraternities have been getting more bad press lately after embarrassing incidents from racist chants in Oklahoma to the branding of pledges here in New Hampshire. We’ll look at the headlines, but also behind them, including what the data says about the impact of fraternity and sorority life for students from grades to personal health.

Friday N.H. News Roundup - August 21, 2015

Aug 21, 2015
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top news stories of the week: GOP Presidential contenders come to Londonderry, wrangling over Common Core at an education summit, a five million dollar White House initiative focused on heroin promises help for East coast states including New Hampshire, and a sinkhole big enough to swallow a car snarls traffic on I-93. 

Eversource

Officials with Northern Pass, the controversial hydropower project, have announced an offer to bury an additional fifty-two miles of power lines – roughly a third of the total. But opponents still have concerns, including impacts on the environment and property values. We’ll get the latest, hear from both sides, and find out what might be next. 

Brett Levin / Flickr/CC

We  sit down with Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer, who is in New Hampshire talking about his efforts to ease federal marijuana laws. It’s a huge debate going on around the country, as more states move toward medical marijuana, decriminalization, and, in a few cases, legalization.

Michael Coughlin / Flickr/CC

We talk with author Pete Earley, whose book “Crazy” examines how prisons and jails have become warehouses for people with mental illness. Earley describes his own struggle to help his bipolar son avoid incarceration, as well as the wider mental health system of a “revolving door” between hospitals and prisons.  

New Hampshire Tourism: What Brings Visitors?

Aug 17, 2015
Quiggyt4, ShellMotorSportsUS, weesam2010 / Flickr/CC

Maine is known for its lobster and coast, and Vermont for its quaint villages and bucolic scenery. But what draws tourists to the Granite State?  Our visitors are a mixed group – from Nascar fans to rock climbers to those who love tax free shopping.  We’ll find out what pulls people here, and whether the state’s brand could use an update. 

Friday N.H. News Roundup - August 14, 2015

Aug 14, 2015
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

We're checking in on the top news stories of the week: Granite State Democrats are upset with the national party’s debate rules, and a schedule that puts New Hampshire’s event right before Christmas.  Former Congresswoman Carol Shea Porter aims to retake the first district seat she lost last year.  And a federal court rejects New Hampshire’s ban on so-called “ballot selfies.”

joeshoe / Flickr/CC

As internet natives, brought up in the digital age, today’s young activists are increasingly turning to online platforms to organize and communicate. From Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter to the ALS ice bucket challenge, social movements have begun to enlist the mobilizing force of social media.

DonnaG / Flickr/CC

After the GOP debates, Donald Trump continues to rile the race, while Carly Fiorina gains praise for a strong performance. On the Democratic side, the crowds for Bernie Sanders continue to grow.  Meanwhile, President Obama campaigns for his Iran nuclear deal, and protests rose this weekend in Ferguson on the anniversary of Michael Brown’s death.

U.S. National Archives / Flickr/CC

This month, there’s been a lot of attention to the rules and regulations around casting a ballot, with last week’s fiftieth anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, and a federal appeals court rejecting a Texas voter I.D. law.  We’re discussing how and why most states have tightened up their voting requirements, including New Hampshire.

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