The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 8 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on iTunes, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 8/15 - Camping: Past, Present & Future

Tuesday, 8/16 - State of the Media

Wednesday, 8/17 - A Closer Look at NH's Medical Marijuana Law

Thursday, 8/18 - TBA

Friday, 8/12 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup

TSCeleb News / Flickr/CC

With more attention to problems in police-community relations around the country, one change that nearly everyone agrees on in the Granite State is the need for more body cameras. We'll discuss a bill that proposes rules for New Hampshire law enforcement that may opt to use the technology, addressing questions of privacy, effectiveness, storage, protocol, and cost.

Charles Willams / Flickr/CC

Heroin pills. That’s how Andrew Kolodny describes oxycodone, one of the most widely prescribed – and abused – narcotic painkillers in the U.S. 

Kolodny is executive director of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing and senior scientist at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. He joined The Exchange this week to discuss the opioid crisis – its origins and how states, including New Hampshire, are trying to overcome it.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - April 15, 2016

Apr 15, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're checking in on the top news stories of the week: the U.S. Senate race between Kelly Ayotte and Maggie Hassan is garnering lots of out-of-state attention and lots of out-of-state money, New Hampshire Fish and Game withdraws its controversial proposal to resume bobcat hunting, and on Equal Pay day, one bagel chain gives female customers twenty-three cents off.

Prescribing Opioids During an Addiction Epidemic

Apr 14, 2016
Charles Williams / Flickr/CC

State lawmakers, doctors, and others in the medical profession have been hammering out new guidelines for prescribing these drugs to tackle the issue of over-use and alleviate the addiction crisis. We'll get the latest on this discussion and also find out how New Hampshire's approach compares with other states.

N.H. Debates Drones

Apr 12, 2016
Jim Lowe / Flickr/CC

New Hampshire is among many states attempting to navigate the brave new world of these unmanned flying machines, addressing privacy and safety concerns.  Meanwhile, the federal government could swoop in and make all these measures moot as lawmakers on Capitol Hill consider legislation that would allow the FAA to trump state laws.

Pierre Gautreau / Flickr/CC

First, we'll talk about a bill that aims to repeal a state law that allows abortion clinics to establish twenty-five foot buffer zones, keeping protesters that distance away. 

AMS Archives / Flickr/CC

A new book by Stephen Long describes how this giant storm transformed the New England landscape and seared itself into the memory of its people.  We’ll delve into just how big it was, the wide-ranging impacts, including how the hurricane created public works projects and developed new thinking around forestry. We'll also talk about preparation for the next inevitable great storm.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - April 8, 2016

Apr 8, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're covering the top news stories of the week: veterans hospitals in N.H. and Vermont face scrutiny over scheduling and wait times.  After years of debate, the Executive Council votes in favor of expansion at Mount Sunapee ski resort. And state lawmakers continue to weigh bills, including one concerning abortion clinic buffer zones.

Gloconda Beekman / Flickr/CC

After the Flint, Michigan water crisis, many around the country started taking a closer look their own water systems. And with a recent contamination scare in southern New Hampshire by the chemical PFOA  - the concerns have become local.  We'll look at the state's sources for drinking water, and the challenges to delivering it free from contaminants.

Concussions: What We Know Now and How to Respond

Apr 6, 2016
David Hassler / Flickr/CC

With the NFL recently admitting that repeated blows to the head can cause degenerative brain disease, we take a time-out to scan the research on brain trauma, including innovations in reducing incidents and assessing concussions.  But is what we're learning discouraging participation in contact sports? And is rising concern over brain injury backed by science?

NHPR

In his annual address, Huddleston celebrated UNH's one hundred and fiftieth birthday this year, and declared that the state's flagship institution is thriving, with a growing student body, new degree programs, and robust private donations.  Still, challenges remain, including uncertain state funding and staggering student debt.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - April 1, 2016

Apr 2, 2016
Sara Plourde / Flickr/CC

The Statehouse takes on one of the biggest questions of the year on Thursday: whether to reauthorize the state's Medicaid expansion program. The first congressional district race has a shake-up with one Republican primary contender dropping out, and another jumping in. And concerns about the water contaminant PFOA continue as more wells are found to contain the chemical.

Gender Gap: Why Are Women More Religious?

Mar 31, 2016
Rachel Martin / Flickr/CC

A new study finds that while Americans overall are a religious bunch compared to people in other developed countries. Among U.S. women, that commitment is especially high, whether it's attending worship services or daily prayer.  We'll look at this gender-gap, what might be behind it, and what it means for organized religion.

Jan Denton Chua / Flickr/CC

Under the affordable care act, thirty one states, including New Hampshire, opted to expand this health insurance coverage for low-income people.  Now, the legislature is debating how and whether to extend the program.  The House has said yes, but with some controversial conditions. The Senate votes on Thursday.

cuffsnchains / Flickr/CC

With growing concerns nationally and in New Hampshire about a large and expensive prison population, the House recently passed a bill to repeal mandatory minimum sentences for some offenses. And then later we'll look at another House measure to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana.

Open Seat: Looking Ahead to N.H.'s Governor Race

Mar 28, 2016
Gary Lerude / Flickr/CC

New Hampshire's governor race is among the top-watched contests in the country, with Maggie Hassan leaving the corner office to run for U.S. Senate.  This open seat has led to active competitions in both parties, with many candidates already focused on the opioid crisis, education, Medicaid, and the state's energy future.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - March 25, 2016

Mar 25, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're checking in on the top news stories of the week.

Debating N.H.'s Energy Future

Mar 24, 2016
Sabatino Bahir / Flickr/CC

Granite State businesses have long bemoaned New Hampshire's high energy costs, complaining they discourage expansion here and even tempt some firms to leave the state.  Last fall, the Business and Industry Association launched a new campaign called Energize NH to focus attention on what it calls a crisis:  the high price of energy and the need for more infrastructure and supply to lower those costs. The Energize NH campaign comes at a key time, when the Granite State seems engaged in a huge discussion about energy over pipelines and powerlines, and whether other approaches and other ways of thinking are in order, including better efficiency, a smarter grid, and an emphasis on those power sources that don't contribute to climate change.

Osair Manassan / Flickr/CC

It's a growing group nationally: parents who refuse to let their children take statewide assessments such as those aligned with Common Core. Now, New Hampshire lawmakers are considering a bill allowing parents to do the same without fear of penalty, arguing these tests do more harm than good. But test-backers say they provide valuable information.

Todd Huffman / Flickr/CC

Designed to reduce the spread of disease by distributing clean needles to drug users, needle exchange programs can also provide outreach and referral for treatment.  Now, a bill in the legislature would allow these centers in New Hampshire. And while there's general support, concerns include whether to decriminalize trace amounts of heroin.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

It's been fifteen years since the state's unemployment rate was down this far - at 2.7%: good news, but there's concern a tight labor market makes it tough for employers to find workers.  We'll look at that, as well as improvements in the housing market, especially for sellers, and the local impact of global turmoil.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - March 18, 2016

Mar 18, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're taking a look at some of the top news stories of the week.

eric molina / Flickr/CC

We're checking in on the state's response to the ongoing opioid epidemic.

Can't Take a Joke?: The Power of Editorial Cartoons

Mar 16, 2016
Signe Wilkinson / NH Humanities

Way back to the times when corrupt party bosses like William Tweed of New York's Tammany Hall, American politicians have known to beware of cartoonists lampooning their greed and missteps. And while nowadays, constituents are more literate and able to read probing newspaper articles than they were in the nineteenth century, the power of editorial cartoons remains: as proved by routine imprisonment of cartoonists in some places of the world, as well as the grim killings at the French satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris last January.  And since then, there's been greater global attention and awareness to the role political cartoons still play and the controversy they spark.  And this week in the Granite State, New Hampshire Humanities is taking up the topic this week at an event called "Can't Take a Joke?" that explores editorial cartoons, and the subjects of artistic freedom, first amendment rights, and censorship.

Political Turmoil in the 2016 Presidential Race

Mar 14, 2016
Allegra Boverman / Flickr/CC

The 2016 Presidential Race just finished one of the most tumultuous weeks of campaigning in recent memory. As Donald Trump continues to roll toward the Republican nomination, clashes at his campaign events continue, with some of the most heated occurring this weekend in Chicago. Meanwhile, on the Democratic side, a tightening race in Illinois is giving the Sanders campaign hope for another come-from-behind victory over Hillary Clinton. 

GUESTS: 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - March 11, 2016

Mar 11, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're looking at the top New Hampshire news stories of the week.

What to Read Now: Spring Book Picks, 2016

Mar 8, 2016
NHPR

We'll hear about some of the best new books coming out this spring. Also, check out NHPR's other book-related series: The Bookshelf is an NHPR project featuring authors from around New Hampshire and the region, as well as books about New Hampshire by authors from anywhere. And the 10 Minute Writer's Workshop is a new podcast featuring interviews with writers about their writing process.

Another Look at Commuter Rail in N.H.

Mar 8, 2016
lzcdome / Flickr/CC

For years, advocates of commuter rail have pushed the idea of a passenger train connecting Boston with at Nashua and Manchester, and even possibly Concord. But commuter rail has always bumped up against one huge, seemingly immovable object:  money.  It's not cheap to build such a system,  roughly two-hundred-million dollars - and so the argument has long been that it's just not worth it, given all the other priorities New Hampshire has, including roads and bridges that need repair.  However, this year, supporters are continuing their efforts, bolstered by rising business backing in the Southern Tier.  And just recently,  they urged a House Committee to keep four million dollars in the state's transportation plan to fund rail study and planning. 

Lissa / Flickr/CC

The debate over physician-assisted suicide came to the fore in New Hampshire last month when a Concord man asked about it on a national stage. Jim Kinhan, who himself has terminal cancer, asked Hillary Clinton at a Manchester town hall how she would, if elected president, use her executive power to bring attention to the issue. The conversation made news, but the discussion about aid in dying has been ongoing for decades, legalized first in Oregon twenty years ago, and in California just last year. And while only five states in all have passed a law, some in the Granite State hope that New Hampshire will be the sixth. But there is a lot of debate over the risks of allowing the option at all, and two bills seeking to form a study committee on the topic have passed through the legislature, only to be vetoed by Governor Hassan.  However, advocates are hopeful that this year's study committee bill has enough additional detail to pass her desk, and pave the way for a possible legalization bill in a future term.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup - March 4, 2016

Mar 4, 2016
Sara Plourde

We're covering the top New Hampshire news stories of the week.

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