The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 8 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

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Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 6/27 -   Summer Book Show

Tuesday, 6/28 - How does Britain exiting E.U. affect N.H.?

Wednesday, 6/29 - Rebroadcast:  TBA

Thursday, 6/30 - The Sky Guys

Friday, 7/1 - Friday N.H. News Roundup

Once again, lawmakers are looking at bills to increase gambling options in New Hampshire.  With more gaming sites opening up in  Maine and Massachusetts some say that’s a reason to expand here, while opponents say just the opposite.  Meanwhile, Governor Lynch says he’s not willing to “make a bet” on gambling, making the reality of casinos in the Granite State tougher, but not impossible for this cause.

Guests

Next week on the Exchange, we begin with a look at the issue of class in this country and why some say that “American dream” of rags to riches is more elusive than ever.  Then, the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, as a national conversation begins over base closures; we’ll discuss the possibility of Portsmouth being on that list.  We'll look at the mortgage market and then end week with the debate over the latest iteration of a constitutional amendment on Education Funding.  Join us all next week for the Exchange each morning at 9/and again at 8 pm, here on NHPR!

With neighboring Vermont and Maine now allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana to their sick patients, a new bill with the same goal is afoot in New Hampshire. But it has an uphill battle as  recent similar proposals have failed before.  We’ll get the latest on the discussion here, and see how Maine and Vermont are doing, since medical marijuana was approved. 

Guests

We sit down with Ross Gittell, the New Chancellor of New Hampshire’s Community College System.  As one of the state’s leading economists, Gittell enters the job with a deep understanding of  our business and jobs climate.  Now, as Chancellor, he hopes to draw upon that background:  making a strong link between education, training and economic health.  We'll talk with him about his new role

Guest

Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/photopunk13/5562192977/"> Voluntary Amputation </a> via FLickr / Creative Commons

Recently we’ve seen dueling definitions of what it means to be poor. The U.S. Census Bureau came up with two figures, depending on whether factors like food stamps are included.  And another study defined poverty as having scant resources. But some have long said that poverty figures are exaggerated and used for political purposes.

Guests:

Beth Mattingly: Director of Research on Vulnerable Families at the Carsey Institute and Professor of Sociology at the University of New Hampshire.

The Accordion Family

Feb 3, 2012

For centuries, that transition between teen-hood and adulthood has been accompanied with a newfound independence, where young men and women leave the roost, go to college, buy a house and raise a family.  But according to author Katherine Newman, high unemployment rates, the rise of short-term employment, longer life expectancies and the high cost of living have forced many a young adult back home to live with mom and dad.  They are called 'Accordion Families' and depending on the culture, they're met with a variety of acceptance.  Today we look closer into this new phenomenon called Accord

The Republican presidential campaign has provided the first test of the Supreme Court’s “Citizens’ United” decision which allowed outside groups to spend millions on campaigns. While some decry their power, others say they represent free-and-democratic speech.  We’ll look at this issue and new information on who’s providing Super-Pac dollars.  

Guests

In his final address, Governor John Lynch looked back at his legacy as much as he did look forward, but Lynch did underline some key points.  He promised to veto expanded gambling, warned Northern Pass supporters to tread lightly and encouraged a constitutional amendment on education funding. We’ll talk about the speech, play back parts of it and get your thoughts as well.  

Guests

New Hampshire lawmakers are preparing to vote on whether adults should have to show a valid I. D. when they vote at the ballot box.  Many other states are now considering these laws as well.  Supporters say it’s all about stamping out fraud, but critics call it an attack on a fundamental right of citizenship. Today we discuss the Voter I.D. issue.

Guests

In recent years, New Hampshire's Health and Human Services department has seen deep budget cuts and layoffs,  and is now battling with the state’s hospitals and the U.S. Department of Justice over issues of taxation and patient care.  Leading the way, its commissioner, Nick Toumpas, who was just reappointed for another term last month.  We’ll hear Toumpas’ take on these issues, as well as how the state is handling aspects of the new federal health care law. 

Guest

Next week on the Exchange, we begin with New Hampshire Health and Human Services Commissioner Nick Toumpas and how he’s handling budget cuts and legal challenges.  Then we look at the debates over the state's Voter ID bill and if Granite State adults may need to flash an ID before stepping into the ballot box next election.

We talk to the co-authors of a new book who spent years in the field of  political “opposition research”.   They’re the folks that dig up the dirt and unveil the skeletons on candidates for Presidential on down to the local school board.  It’s a story that involves shady characters, clandestine meetings and piles of documents, all aimed at bringing down your opponent and winning elections.

Guests

New Hampshire’s new Transportation Commissioner, Christopher Clement came to the job at a tough time for the department. There were lots of projects on the table but not a lot of money to complete them with.  Today, we talk with him about his priorities and some of the hot topics his department faces from the expansion of I-93 to the debate over rail to those red-listed bridges.  

Guest

On Tuesday night President Obama will be making his third State of the Union address to Congress and the American public.  He has progress to announce, the death of Osama bin Laden as well as the ending of war in Iraq but the economy is still stagnant with only little improvements and he'll need to be able to explain that.  The day after the address, we'll listen back to segments of it, see what he said, what he focused on and how the content and tone of his speech may play out to Americans listening, especially in an election year. 

Guests

It’s been almost two years since President Obama signed into  law sweeping health care reform called The Affordable Care Act".  Since its passing, its set off legal challenges but also set in motion changes that have taken hold, including requiring coverage for young adults.  We’ll take a look at this law, its progress, its problems, and its prospects, as well as how the political climate affects the debate, especially as President Obama prepares for his State of the Union address Tuesday evening.

Guests

The days leading up to the Palmetto state’s primary were a raucous affair with spirited television debates, candidates dropping out, major mud flinging and an inundation of attack ads. Now that the dust has settled, we’ll talk about  who won, who lost, and how this contest shapes the rest of the republican Presidential race. 

Guests

For three decades, Gary Hirshberg has been at the helm of one of the Granite state’s largest and most prominent businesses, as well as a leading advocate for both the organic and local food movements  and democratic causes.  Now, Hirshberg is stepping down.  We’ll talk with him about his legacy, how ideas around food have evolved over his time there and what may be next for him.

Guest

  • Gary Hirshberg - Chairman, president and CEO of Stonyfield Farm in Londonderry.  

Next week on the Exchange, we begin by examining the South Carolina Primary and if the results may re-shape the Republican Presidential campaign.  Then, nearly two years after the Affordable Care Act was signed by President Obama, we'll look to see what progress has been made and what major roadblocks lie in its way.  We'll discuss Obama's State of the Union Address, talk roads and bridges and rail, with New Hampshire’s new Transportation Commissioner Christopher Clement, and end the week with the authors of a new book exploring the “dark side” of American Politics….opposition researchers w

A decade ago, President Bush signed into this wide-ranging education reform bill into law, which has been hotly debated since. Supporters of No Child Left Behind said it was a “wake up call” for public schools, but opponents said it created a nightmare of paperwork and impossible expectations.  We’ll look at the legacy of NCLB, where its helped the national education system, its challenges and how the Obama White House has approached it.

Guests 

Raising Keynes

Jan 18, 2012

We explore the economic philosophy of John Maynard Keynes. His ideas of government spending “priming the pump” during bad times have  been applied by American leaders from FDR to Obama. But Keynsian  theory continue to spark fierce debate – some feel it’s still the best way out of a slump – but others believe this distorts the free-market and that these ideas have run their course.

Guests

By zooovro

A new law allows parents who object to certain classroom materials to request alternative coursework for their child.  Governor Lynch vetoed the bill last year, but the legislature recently overrode that veto.  We’ll look at arguments for and against this law, and how school districts may adapt.   

Guests:

  • J. Scott Moody, Vice President of Policy at Cornerstone Policy Research and Cornerstone Action
  • Rhonda Wesolowski, President of NEA-NH.

We'll also hear from:

We sit down with NPR Media correspondent David Folkenflik. He’s the guy who covers the latest from the news business from the New York Times and Fox News to individual bloggers and small-town papers. And, at times, Folkenflick’s had to report on the blemishes at his own organization.

Guest:

  • David Folkenflik: NPR Media correspondent.

Next week on the Exchange, we start off with a favorite from the Exchange vault, our interview with NPR's Media Correspondent, David Folkenflick. Then we discuss the realities of a new state law that would allow parents to block material in schools that they found objectionable.  Wednesday we explore the economic philosophy John Keynes. His ideas have been applied by American leaders from FDR to Obama, but some say that in twenty twelve the Keynesian way has run its course.

We sit down with a roundtable of House and Senate leaders on the New Hampshire Legislature from 2012.   Only two weeks in, and the statehouse is full-steam head with debates on guns, education, redistricting, and it’s only just begun.  We’ll talk about their hopes for 2012, and where they may find common ground  which could be hard to find in an election year.   

Guests

Former New Jersey Governor and EPA head Christie Todd Whitman is now leading a national effort to expand nuclear power, calling it the best clean energy source to replace fossil fuels. But her efforts come at a difficult time for the nuclear industry,  given fears stoked by the Fukushima disaster in Japan last spring and criticisms from some suggesting that danger it can bring is not worth the energy it can provide. 

Guest

Tracy Lee Carroll for NHPR

After nearly a  year of speeches, rallies, political ads and debates, New Hampshire's First in the Nation Primary ended pretty quickly tonight with Mitt Romney taking gold.  Ron Paul finished a strong second with John Huntsman, who put all his cards into the Granite State, finished a respectable third.  Today we'll we'll look back at last night's contest, see who the big winners and loser were and where the race to be the Republican Presidential candidate goes from here. 

 

Guests: 

According to our guest today, Colin Woodard, America's political divisions aren't between red states and blue states, right and left, Republicans and Democrats but between 11 distinct North American cultural regions.  They are regions the he names "Yankeedom", "Greater Appalachia", "The Deep South" and "The Far West" and they have been created by centuries of Americans who settled there, each with their own unique cultures, religions, political traditions and ethnographic characteristics.  Woodard suggests that only by truly understanding these regions can we begin to see beyond these deep 

No matter how much you love a candidate's jobs plan, their ideas around health care, their environmental platform or their views on immigration, if you want a Republican in the White House and they can't beat the President, it may not be the best choice.  Some of that has to do with familiarity of the candidate, some has to do with money, and some has to do with those platforms and how they not only counter the President's but fall in favor with many independents who may be on the fence.

"Skating on thin ice" is the way one New Hampshire economist describes the current state of our economy.  New Hampshire is still out performing other states in terms of its unemployment rate and the stability of its housing market, but economic troubles in Europe could mean bad news for the Granite State which relies very much on exports.  Also some worry that if the national economy doesn't gain a lot of momentum, New Hampshire's economy could be compromised.  Today we look at the New Hampshire economy, examine the good news and not so good news and ask whether 2012 may be the turnaround y

Next week on the Exchange we culminate our Issue Tuesday's series on a Monday as we look at the Republican Presidential candidates and how the topic of how electable they are may play into who the voters choose at the ballot box.  Then on Primary Day, we talk to author Colin Woodard on his new book "American Nation" and explore how  he says, our political differences as Americans are not determined by red states and blue states but 11 distinct cultural North American regions that's histories have formed our true divisions.

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