The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

Want to leave us a message? Call this number anytime: 202.649.0835

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 9/25 -  Dealing with Racism in N.H. Schools

Tuesday, 9/26 - The Art and History of New England Stone Walls

Wednesday, 9/27 - The Latest in Concussion Research

Thursday, 9/28 - Risks, Decisions, and Death in the Presidentials

Friday, 9/29 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup

For a year and a half leading up to the N.H. Primary, reporter Scott Conroy followed the  2016 campaign up and down New Hampshire. Along the way, he absorbed local insights and entertaining anecdotes from the state officials and political operatives who have determined national political fates for generations, thanks to N.H.'s First-in-the-Nation status. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 21, 2017

Apr 20, 2017

Governor Sununu pushes his kindergarten plan in the New Hampshire House and makes a change at the State Board of Education.   The State Senate considers legalizing, and taxing , online fantasy sports. St. Paul's graduate Owen Labrie is denied a new trial. And a new reports says our air quality is better than it's been in twenty years.


Adrift: Sailing, Survival & the Human Spirit

Apr 20, 2017

Author Steven Callahan was six days into a voyage across the Atlantic when his small sloop was destroyed in heavy storms.  The Maine native scrabbled onto an inflatable raft and began a journey covering more than 1,800 miles before he was found seventy-six days later.  His account, in  Adrift, is as much about the human spirit as it is about survival.   Friday, April 21, 2017,  is the 35th anniversary of his rescue.

Wynan Smith via Flickr/CC

The Division of Children, Youth, and Families has been under intense scrutiny in recent years, after two toddlers who had been involved with the agency were killed by their mothers in a span of just ten months.

The fallout has included legal battles, the director's ouster, and an independent investigation that revealed an agency beset by high turnover, an overworked staff, limited funding, and restrictive policies.

Flickr

A Senate bill proposes allowing parents to use public education funds for alternative educational expenses, from private school tuition to computer equipment. A growing number of states have adopted such measures but not without plenty of debate.  We'll take a look at that discussion here, and around the country. 


Fatal Flaws: DCYF Looks To Reform

Apr 17, 2017
Pixabay.com

A recent Concord Monitor series examines the many problems at New Hampshire's Division of Children, Youth and Families, including child abuse cases where at least eight children died in the last half-decade. The drug crisis, high staff turnover, limited funding, and restrictive policies all present challenges as the state looks to reform. 


The Conflict Over Coexisting With Beavers

Apr 14, 2017
flickr/cc

Beavers (Castor canadensis) have been in North America for two million years. Their ponds ease flooding downstream, and support large numbers of bird species, fish, amphibians, and otters. They are a keystone species to an entire eco-system. Humans and beavers have a long history together because they like to live in the same places, but the way we've built our infrastructure has almost guaranteed our two species will be locked in eternal conflict.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 14, 2017

Apr 14, 2017

A bill to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana hits a snag in the Senate.  All eyes are on two of Governor Sununu's nominees for the Dept. of Labor and the Dept. of Environmental Services.  And the Northern Pass transmission project begins lengthy hearings before the Site Evaluation Committee. 


N.H. Public Radio

The uproar over Senate Bill 3 shows no signs of abating.

The bill's lead sponsor, Republican state senator Regina Birdsell,  insists it simply ensures that each vote cast in New Hampshire is valid and that voters meet certain requirements. She says she removed elements that were especially objectionable to opponents, including involvement of local police in helping to confirm voters' addresses. 

SB3 & Voting Laws: Facts, Fear, and Fiction

Apr 13, 2017
Allegra Boverman

A voting requirements bill now in the N.H. House has drawn huge attention this year and continues to generate questions about domicile, voter fraud, and access at the polls. Supporters say even the perception of cheating at the ballot box is unacceptable, while critics call SB3 a "voter suppression" bill.

NHPR

For all the discord between Democrats and President Trump, U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen sounded a few cautious notes of agreement during an interview on The Exchange.   

On Trump's missile attacks in response to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's use of chemical weapons, Shaheen affirmed her support.

A Conversation With U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen

Apr 12, 2017
N.H. Public Radio

Given her position on the Foreign Relations and Armed Services committees, we get U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen's take on the recent air strikes against Syria.  We also cover G.O.P. health care reform efforts, New Hampshire's opioid crisis, and rising political rancor in the U.S. Senate. 


Andrew Filer via Flickr/CC

When it comes to Senate Bill 7, which lowers the income threshold for food-stamp  eligibility, among other changes, Democratic state senator Dan Feltes has some choice words:  "One of the worst bills I've ever seen."  And, also, "horrible." 

Feltes joined The Exchange this week, along with Republican state senator Jeb Bradley, co-sponsor of SB7, who  sees things vastly differently.

Eating Disorders Are Wide-Reaching And Multifaceted

Apr 10, 2017
Pexels

The Internet, social media, and increased awareness both help and hinder eating disorder treatment and management. And now, as more men and pre-teens are diagnosed with eating disorders, approaches toward resolving these problems are constantly evolving.


Allegra Boverman for New Hampshire Public Radio

For conservatives, the idea makes common sense: Require people who receive government assistance, such as food stamps, to hold a job or engage in community service.  Opponents, however, say this ignores challenges facing a population already weighed down by poverty. A bill in the Senate, SB7, would change income eligibility for food stamps, and includes some work requirements.  Opponents say it would exclude thousands of Granite Staters in need of assistance, but supporters argue it focuses on those truly in need.  


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: April 7, 2017

Apr 7, 2017

The Republican-controlled New Hampshire House adjourns without passing a two-year state budget.  We look at the ramifications as the Senate begins working next week on their version of the state’s new two-year budget without a House proposal.  The U.S. Supreme Court leaves a lower court ruling intact, allowing ballot selfies in the Granite State.  And for some politicians it's never too early, with two already announcing their bids for Governor and Congress.


After more than 1,600 drug-overdose deaths over the last five years, Timothy Rourke, longtime advocate for expanded treatment and recovery services, says the state may be reaching a turning point.  Maybe.

NH's Opioid Crisis at a Crossroad

Apr 5, 2017

Few states have been as hard hit by the opioid epidemic as New Hampshire, where more than 1,600 Granite Staters have died of drug overdose since 2012. After several years battling the epidemic, some on the front lines of addiction are pointing to hopeful signs, even while urging vigilance and more investment in treatment and prevention. We take a look at what's working, what's not, and why some are raising alarms about an old scourge: alcohol. 


Marina Shemesh

Healthcare providers are focusing more on prevention, given recent discoveries into this degenerative neurological condition. Meanwhile, treatment and management remain challenging, as families and caregivers often struggle to find appropriate and affordable care. 


U.S. Foreign Policy and the Truman Doctrine

Apr 3, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Seventy years ago, President Harry Truman laid out his vision for U.S.  foreign policy in a speech that became known as "The Truman Doctrine."  It marked the start of the Cold War, with the U.S. assuming a role as a global leader. A straight-talker with little political experience, Truman is sometimes compared to President Trump. But Trump's doctrine of "America First" marks a departure from previous foreign policy.  We examine the events leading up to Truman's speech, it's influence on U.S. foreign policy, nationalism, and global involvement.


 Below story corrects information in an earlier post found here

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 31, 2017

Mar 31, 2017

The New Hampshire House gets ready to vote on it's version of the state budget, but some conservatives say the Republican-crafted budget is too rich.  New Hampshire's two U.S. senators say they'll vote against Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's Supreme Court pick.  A new energy project coming from Canada and an adverse decision by regulators thickens the plot when it comes to the Northern Pass project.  


Transgender: Exploring Gender Identity

Mar 30, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Many people struggle with basic questions about gender and labels, including the concept of a transgender identity. While debate around recent legislation has brought the issue into the spotlight, social media and the internet have played a key role in shifting the culture's perspective on gender for several years.

On this edition of The Exchange, we'll look at the terms, the biology, and the emotional aspects of gender identity.


WoodleyWonderWorks; Flickr

This post has been corrected and revised to reflect the following:  The House Finance Committee recently approved funding for a position to work with the N.H. Dept. of Education to fulfill aspects of the state's new "Dyslexia Law."   The position was not originally in the Governor's version of the budget.  

The full House votes on this next week, and, after that, the state senate will makes its own budgetary decision on the position.  For more, read here.

Once described as " word blindness," dyslexia affects a person's ability to read accurately and fluently. It's surprisingly common, but early screening and intervention can make a major difference.  The new law requires school districts do just that.   

Allegra Boverman via Flickr/Creative Commons

During an interview on NHPR's The Exchange Tuesday, Governor Sununu insisted that a GOP-led effort to require voters to provide proof they are connected to the community where they vote is not meant to exclude anyone but simply to ensure the integrity of the state's voting process.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It's been about a month since N.H. Governor Chris Sununu delivered his budget address, which included $18 million for full-day kindergarten.  The House meanwhile appears to have somewhat different priorities  -- eliminating that funding in its version of the budget.

Scroll down to watch our Facebook Live video stream of Governor Sununu on The Exchange.

We'll get the Governor's take on this development, as well as his views on last week's collapse of the GOP health care bill. And we'll find out how far along he is on achieving his goal of talking with 100 companies in 100 days in hopes of convincing them to come to the Granite State.


How Emotions are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain

Mar 24, 2017
MacMillan

Our guest says most of us are pretty clueless about this - given all the misinformation on how our brains and bodies create our feelings.  In her new book, Lisa Feldman Barrett challenges long-held theories about emotions, debunked by modern neuroscience, but still shaping everything from health care to public safety.

This show was originally broadcast on February 27th, 2017. 

GUEST:

  • Lisa Feldman Barrett - A University Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University. She received an NIH Director's Pioneer Award for her groundbreaking research on emotion. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 24, 2017

Mar 24, 2017

Governor Chris Sununu made an unannounced trade mission to Montreal, re-affirming his support for Northern Pass and urging updates to NAFTA. House budget writers craft their version of the new state spending plan, eliminating 18 million dollars in kindergarten funding.  And flags are lowered to half-staff on the news of the death of State Senator Scott McGilvray. 


New Thinking on Nuclear Weapons

Mar 22, 2017
The Smithsonian Institution

We examine nuclear security in a world where Cold War policies have left the country's nuclear weapons on a hair-trigger alert. President Donald Trump has proposed boosting federal spending on the production of nuclear weapons by more than $1 billion in 2018.  With escalating tensions recently due to nuclear weapons testing by North Korea, we discuss nuclear weapons policy, the current international situation, and how we can reduce the risk of nuclear war.


Becoming Savvy About Fake News

Mar 21, 2017
Pexels

The wave of fake news that flooded Facebook and other social media during last year's election campaign was a wake-up call for many.  But fake news  has actually been around for a long time. Seventy-five years ago, regional newspapers in the South falsely reported that first lady Eleanor Roosevelt  was quietly organizing  black women into secret "Eleanor Clubs," with the motto: "A white woman in the kitchen by 1943."    In the digital era, that kind of rumor can spread far and worldwide, in no time. 

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