The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy. Click here to get our podcast on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

Want to leave us a message? Call this number anytime: 202.649.0835

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Come see The Exchange Weekly N.H. News Roundup live! We're taping an episode Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, 7 p.m., at The Barley House in Concord. Tickets are free. You can register here.

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Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 01/15 - Rebroadcast: The Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. 

Tuesday, 01/16 - International Conflicts

Wednesday, 01/17 - Clashing over Commerce: A History of US Trade Policy 

Thursday, 01/18 - TBA

Friday, 01/19 -  Weekly N.H. News Roundup

The Humane Society of the United States

Animal cruelty has been in the public eye this year.  About 80 Great Danes were recently rescued at a mansion in Wolfeboro - living in filthy conditions.  Just last week, four horses were taken from a Deering farm, ill and neglected. And in February,  more than 30 Persian cats were found in a Barnstead home, in squalid conditions.  These cases raise questions -- about whether our state laws on breeding and animal cruelty should be tougher, about when neighbors and town officials should step in, and about the psychology of animal hoarding.

Understanding And Preventing Animal Abuse

Jun 27, 2017

The story of Great Danes rescued from a Wolfeboro mansion is just the latest in New Hampshire to raise questions about how and why such extreme situations develop. Should animal breeding laws be tightened? And what are the signs of mental health issues or social isolation that can lead to the hoarding of pets? 


Pixabay.com

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a limited version of President Trump's travel ban this week, saving broader consideration for the fall.  We cover the legal arguments and look at other high-profile high court cases this term, including First Amendment issues on trademarks and hate speech. 


NHPR Flickr

It's been two years this week since New Hampshire's hands-free driving law banning the use of hand-held devices behind the wheel went into effect.

Major Matt Shapiro of the New Hampshire State Police was one of the leaders behind this law, aimed at getting drivers's eyes away from their phones and on the road.  Speaking on The Exchange, Shapiro says there is clear evidence it's working. 

The Dangers of Distracted Driving

Jun 23, 2017
Sadie Colbert; USAF

The start of summer marks the one-hundred deadliest days of driving for teenagers, but young drivers aren't the only high risk people hitting the streets.  It's been two years since the Hands-Free driving law went into effect in New Hampshire, but how much has it improved the safety of our roads? Do we need to go further? 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 23, 2017

Jun 23, 2017

Catch up on this week's stop N.H. stories:  The New Hampshire House and Senate pass an $11.7 billion budget. Despite a Republican majority, GOP leaders had to work hard to pass this spending plan, but it's now on its way to the Governor's desk.  Another fraught issue for both sides of the aisle: a bill funding full-day kindergarten.  And more than 80 Great Dane dogs were rescued from a puppy mill operating out of a mansion in Wolfeboro.

What's Next For Climate Change Efforts in N.H.?

Jun 21, 2017
WPS Geography

President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement set off protests nationwide - with some Governors, cities, and businesses, signing on to their own pledges.  But how much does Paris really matter - to what's already happening in New Hampshire?  We'll sort out the politics from the policy. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 16, 2017

Jun 16, 2017

N.H. House and Senate negotiators reach a deal on the $11.7 billion budget this week but the spending plan is facing pushback from both sides of the aisle ahead of next week's full vote. At a hearing on the Northern Pass project, opponents show up in force. And bears continue to make news in the Granite State. 


Macroscopic Solutions / flickr/cc

We get the latest on N.H. tick populations, health precautions, and research.  2017 is predicted to be a banner year for ticks - meaning more risk for all of us, from Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.  How concerned should we be about Powassan virus?   There is no vaccine for Lyme disease, but biodiversity can help thwart it. And we'll find out about a promising treatment being developed for Lyme.

This show was originally broadcast on May 22, 2017. 


Wikimedia Commons

One hundred years ago, President Wilson signed the Selective Service Act, as the nation joined World War One. Since then, the Act has been rewritten many times.  Today, we have a volunteer military but all young men must still register.  We looked at the history of conscription, and current debate over reviving the draft. 


Pexels

We can now live-stream events through programs like Facebook Live and YouTube, turning us all into potential quasi-celebrities. But what are the ethical implications of sharing our personal lives or even criminal acts online? How has the role of bystander changed in the digital era, and how should social media companies deal with objectionable material? 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 9, 2017

Jun 9, 2017

It was another busy week: former FBI Director James Comey gave testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee yesterday, Governor Sununu aligned with President Trump on his decision to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement, and there's more wrangling over the state budget. 


"The Baker's Secret" & The Anniversary of D-Day

Jun 7, 2017
Photo by Stephen Kiernan

We commemorate the 100th anniversary of D-Day with a new novel by Vermont author Stephen Kiernan. "The Baker's Secret" is set in a small Normandy village on the eve of D-Day, and tells the story of a village baker who finds a way to overcome the day-to-day tyranny of the Nazi occupiers. Rather than a story of armies and battles, it offers the French perspective, as they were trapped in their coastal communities during the assault, struggling to keep hope alive by caring for each other.   


NHPR Flickr

According to a report from the Project on Student Debt in 2016, New Hampshire college students graduate with the highest debt in the nation, at $36,101. As college tuition prices continue to rise, those in Washington look to reform the college loan system, including consolidating federal loans into management by one company. We'll discuss how this might impact our students in New Hampshire, and other issues related to affording college. 


Molggl Interactive via Flickr/CC

In the wake of a bear family’s relocation after two cubs entered a Hanover household, New Hampshire communities are reconsidering their responsibilities as environmental stewards and asking the question, “What does it take to live with bears?”

Mark Moz via Flickr

New Hampshire's housing market is fiercely competitive and expensive these days. Available homes are few and far between --  a situation otherwise known as "low inventory."  That means it's  a good time to sell --  but buying a home is another story. 

Here's how quickly houses are selling, according to Russ Thibeault, president of Applied Economic Research, an economic and real estate consulting firm in Laconia: "If the paint’s dry, the unit’s filled."

Living with Black Bears in Back Yards

Jun 5, 2017

The recent saga of the troublesome family of bears in Hanover, destined to be killed after they entered a home in search of food, is one of the latest examples of conflict between black bears and humans in New Hampshire.  Governor Chris Sununu intervened, and the three yearlings were captured and relocated to the north country, although the mother bear has yet to be located.  The Hanover human-bear conflict generated concern nationwide, with hundreds signing an online petition and flooding N.H. Fish & Game with calls.  Why did this conflict resonate with so many - and how do we continue to live with bears in New Hampshire?

 


Mark Motz; Flickr

Rising prices and tightening inventory spells good news for sellers and bad news for buyers, particularly first-time home buyers and the state's aging population, who have to compete for the same types of homes in an increasingly fast-paced market. What does it take to buy a home today, and what do these trends mean for the state? 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 2, 2017

Jun 1, 2017

After more than ten hours of debate, the New Hampshire Senate passes a GOP-crafted state budget along party lines. The N.H. House will vote on the plan next week. Three significant pieces of voting legislation are up for a final vote in the House.   Former Manchester Police Chief David Mara takes over as the Governor's Advisor on Addiction and Behavioral Health, known as the "drug czar".  Mara currently serves as interim police chief in Portsmouth. 

Wikimedia Commons

All eyes have been on the Senate after the House failed to pass its own version of the budget earlier this year – for the first time in decades.  The Senate budget includes much of what House budget writers agreed on, though it spends less and includes business tax cuts.


Olja Antic; Flickr

A female superhero, intergalactic travel, a beach-body reboot, and more - this year's summer film schedule is jam-packed with big action, but also some satisfying classic comedy and thought-provoking drama. We'll talk about the must-sees, and the maybe-avoids.


Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War

May 26, 2017

The Vietnam War is largely recalled as a mistake, either in the decision to engage there or in the nature of the engagement.  Veterans of the war remain largely anonymous figures.  Enduring Vietnam recounts the experiences of the young Americans who fought in Vietnam and of families who grieved those who did not return. We talk with author James Wright about the “baby boomers” who grew up in the 1950s, why they went into the military,  how they describe serving in “Nam” and their experiences coming home.

GUEST:  James Wright is author and editor of several history books and a former history professor at Dartmouth College as well as former Dartmouth College President.

This program was originally broadcast on 4/27/17.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 26, 2017

May 25, 2017

Senate Republicans are confident their state budget plan will clear the full Senate. A  full-day kindergarten proposal is tied to the lottery game KENO.  St. Paul’s School releases a report detailing allegations of sexual assault by faculty and staff decades ago. And Fish & Game Officials are flooded with calls to save trouble-making bears in Hanover.


NHPR Flickr

One leading economist says the Granite State is "getting its groove back," with GDP growth up three percent in twenty sixteen. Also, the gig economy, including freelance and contract work, gains traction here, and job prospects widen for the state's aging workforce.


Coast Guard Compass

Decades after President Nixon declared drugs "public enemy number one,"  the criminal justice system is still grappling with the problem.  In recent years, we've seen bipartisan calls for an end to so-called mass incarceration for drug crimes and a shift away from the so-called "war on drugs" toward greater emphasis on treatment for addiction.

As Acting U.S. Attorney John Farley sees it, the phrase "war on drugs" is a bit of a buzz term that oversimplifies a battle now being waged on two fronts.   

NuLawLab; Vimeo

Where are we - in The War on Drugs? Decades after President Nixon declared drugs "public enemy number one,"  the criminal justice system is still grappling with this.  In recent years, we've seen bipartisan calls for an end to so-called mass incarceration for drug crimes.  But now, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is taking a tougher stance on sentencing. 


NHPR

Normandeau's agency's been swamped by a rising number of hikers needing rescue. We'll talk about that, also continued funding struggles, controversy over gun politics, and Fish and Game's starring role in the TV show "North Woods Law: New Hampshire" on Animal Planet. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 19, 2017

May 18, 2017

N.H. political figures respond to this week's turmoil in Washington D.C., quelled to some extent by the appointment of the widely respected Robert S. Mueller III as special counsel to  investigate possible Russian meddling in the 2016 election. State representative Robert Fisher resigns after a N.H. House committee inquiry into his postings on the misogynistic Reddit forum known as the Red Pill. And several racially-charged incidents in recent weeks cloud graduation season at UNH's Durham campus.


Wikimedia Commons

The Exchange discussed New Hampshire's infrastructure issues over a series of shows this year. The American Society of Civil Engineers released their 2017 report card in March, giving New Hampshire a C- overall, with further grades for specific categories, including roads, dams, and drinking water.

Read on for highlights and links to each show, and also for links to additional coverage of New Hampshire's infrastructure. 

Wikimedia Commons

The term net neutrality has been popping up a lot in recent months, as the policy is reviewed in Washington.  But what does it mean for an Internet service provider to be neutral? We look at how two key aspects of this:  web speed, and the management of Internet traffic, impact our daily browsing, businesses, and privacy. 


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