The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show, hosted by Laura Knoy.  It airs live at 9 AM and rebroadcast at 7 PM weekdays.

Want to call in during the show? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

Want to leave us a message? Leave us a voicemail at 800.892.6477 at any other time, and we might use it on a future program.

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

If you can't listen to the live show or don't live in our broadcast area, you can listen to our show online (just open the day's show post below) or subscribe to our podcast. Click here to get it on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher. (Don't know how to find and listen to podcasts? Click here for a handy guide created by our friends at VPR!)

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Coming Up on The Exchange: 

Monday, 4/23 - Early Onset Alzheimer's (:40)/CD1 Race Update (:20)

Tuesday, 4/24 - Town Managers on Their Jobs and the Issues

Wednesday, 4/25 - JUULing (What is this new vape trend, and is it harmful?)

Thursday, 4/26 - Rebroadcast: What Types of Housing Does N.H. Need, and Why Don't We Have It?

Friday, 4/27 -  Weekly N.H. News Roundup 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 6, 2017

Oct 5, 2017

Sen. Maggie Hassan announced she is helping to introduce legislation designed to prevent modifications that allow for the rapid fire of semi-automatic weapons. One of the Manchester VA whistleblowers has announced he will challenge Democrat Annie Kuster in New Hampshire's second district as a Republican. And Granite Staters fill more than 20 trucks with supplies for Puerto Rico, thanks to a N.H. state house drive that exceeded expectations.


The fall foliage season is sweeping through New Hampshire, causing residents and leaf-peepers to appreciate anew the forests in the state.  The colors of the season are a function of forest health, and we look closely at efforts to restore and protect three iconic tree species: elm, ash, and chestnut.  And a new report finds that New England is losing 65 acres of forestland per day


Franchise Opportunities; Flickr

After the Graham-Cassidy Bill proposed by Republicans -- their latest Repeal and Replace effort -- failed to garner enough votes recently, patients, healthcare providers, and insurers still face plenty of uncertainty before open enrollment begins November 1. Meanwhile, Senator Bernie Sanders's single-payer proposal continues to gain fans. We'll get the latest on how national politics is shaping the health care debate across the country.  

GUEST:

Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas and former alderman Joyce Craig will take part in a debate hosted by NHPR’s The Exchange.

The debate will air live Thursday, Nov. 2 at 9 a.m. It will be rebroadcast at 7 p.m. later that evening. Laura Knoy, host of The Exchange, will moderate.

The Nov. 7 election will be a rematch of 2015, when Gatsas defeated Craig by just 64 votes.

Gatsas is seeking his fifth term as mayor of New Hampshire’s largest city. A Republican, Gatsas ran for governor last year, but fell short in the GOP primary.

The Las Vegas Shooting: Granite Staters Respond

Oct 2, 2017
Ken Lund, Flickr

It's been called the worst mass shooting in modern American history.  On Sunday evening, a gunman opened fire on an outdoor concert festival  in Las Vegas, killing at least 58 people and injuring many more. Some of the stories surrounding the massacre are eerily familiar: Family members of the gunman express shock upon hearing about the attack; victims describe feelings of disbelief as scenes of mayhem and horror engulfed them.   Yet this attack also surpassed others in terms of numbers killed and injured.  We'll take your questions and comments as details of this latest mass shooting continue to emerge. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 29, 2017

Sep 30, 2017

 

Repetitive hits, which do not cause concussion symptoms, may be causing long term harm in athletes who participate in contact sports up to the age of 12, according to a new study from Boston University's Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Center.

Credit Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

New Hampshire schools and communities have been doing some serious soul searching after reports of racist incidents in which children were allegedly harassed verbally and physically, resulting in neck injuries for one boy.

Right now, many are in response mode.

What are the best strategies in school settings for addressing racial tension or preventing it from happening in the first place? 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 22, 2017

Sep 22, 2017

The Graham-Cassidy healthcare proposal receives mixed response in the Granite State. Community college officials are grilled by New Hampshire lawmakers concerned about a recent audit.  And V.A. whistle blowers raise concerns about continued problems at the facility.


On this episode: The lottery game keno heads to individual cities for approval by voters. Supporters hope it will boost local economies, while critics worry about gambling. And later in the show, Senator Jeb Bradley updates us on efforts to improve Medicaid Expansion. 


The organ donation system is complex, and often misunderstood -  with a waiting list that is long, and constantly shifting. But living donations, high-risk donors, and new scientific developments in tissue growth are making new strides in addressing the need.

This show originally aired on April 17, 2017. 

An Artist's Roundtable

Sep 18, 2017

What does it take to "make it" as an artist in New Hampshire?  Without big-city galleries and crowds of well-heeled patrons, we find out how Granite State artists innovate, especially with social media transforming artistic outreach.  We also explore how our education system views the arts, when the STEM fields, science, technology, engineering and math, get top billing.     

The show originally aired on August 22, 2017. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 15, 2017

Sep 15, 2017

It's not primary season, but voting issues are top of mind in New Hampshire lately with the Presidential Commission on Election Integrity meeting in Manchester this week.  The voting law known as SB3 faces  its first test in a special election in Belknap County.  And Claremont grapples with race-based tension after a report of an alleged lynching attack on an eight-year-old biracial boy.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It's not primary season, but voting is top of mind in New Hampshire these days.

With the passage of the controversial new voting law SB 3 and its first test in the courts and at the polls earlier this week, Granite State voters are split on whether or not the law is necessary, or simply a tactic to suppress students (and others) from casting ballots.

As that story continues to develop, Secretary of State Bill Gardner's participation on President Trump's election commission continues to generate controversy. That group met in New Hampshire this week amid protest from activists and pushback over new, unfounded claims of voter fraud in the state during the 2016 election.

What's Happening With The Northern Pass Project?

Sep 13, 2017
NorthernPass.us

The decision on the hydro-electric transmission project, which would bring power from Canada to New England, has been postponed yet again. We review the goals of this $1.6 billion proposal and examine how the debate around it has changed since it was first presented in 2010.


Lee Haywood via Flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/7iSnfi

Governor Sununu says requiring all school districts to start the school year after Labor Day would help bring the state's education system into the 21st century, and help the economy. 

“We talk about innovation in schools; we talk about 21st century – well,  I think it's time that we start looking at the calendar,” he said on The Exchange. 

E. Grimm

 A school bus driver shortage in New Hampshire, and nationally, is making it difficult for some kids to get to school. It's forced the Northwood district to struggle with the start of the school day, and the town of Wakefield to delay school for two weeks.  Then there's the question of when that first day should be: Governor Sununu set off a statewide debate recently, saying he thinks the first day of school should be after Labor Day - we examine that issue as well.   

 

U.S. Army Europe

A month after the attacks on Sept. 11, President Bush authorized strikes against Al Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.  Those limited attacks have since grown into an enormous commitment, amounting to thousands of American lives and billions of dollars. Meanwhile, President Trump recently renewed American involvement there, vowing victory. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 8, 2017

Sep 8, 2017

President Trump’s decision to end the DACA immigration policy could affect as many as one thousand people in New Hampshire.  ICE orders deportation for Indonesian immigrants in New Hampshire.  Manchester became the first community to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors - seeking to recoup money spent battling opioid addiction.  And Portsmouth says no to Keno, as Rochester puts it on the ballot. 


Keith Shields; NHPR

In light of the recent hurricanes slamming the Gulf Coast and Southeastern United States, The Exchange spoke with Perry Plummer, Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, Jonathan Winter, a Dartmouth professor who has studied increasing precipitation over the last two decades in New England, and two engineers, Jim Gallagher, who specializes in dams, and Fred McNeill, who works in wastewater treatment, about how well New Hampshire is prepared for major weather events. 

A new book by Concord native Benjamin Rachlin, Ghost of the Innocent Man, tells a story of wrongful conviction and exoneration. We learn about the saga of Willie Grimes, imprisoned for 24 years for a rape he did not commit, and his legal fight for freedom.  Rachlin says it's one of many similar cases in recent years, thanks to expanded use of DNA evidence.  

GUEST:  Benjamin Rachlin, author of Ghost of the Innocent Man

Benjamin Rachlin will discuss Ghost of the Innocent Man at Gibson's Bookstore in Concord on Thursday, Sept. 7 at 5:30 p.m.


Steve Hooper; The Keene Sentinal

Hurricane Harvey slammed the Gulf Coast last week, and it got us thinking: How ready is New Hampshire for major storms, hurricanes, and floods?

Perry Plummer, Director of the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management for the New Hampshire Department of Safety, says the state has plenty of work to do to ensure our infrastructure can handle the kind of extreme weather events that are becoming increasingly common.

"We know more water is coming; we’re going to get these types of rain storms," Plummer said on The Exchange. "Obviously, I don’t think we’ll get a Harvey in New Hampshire, but we are going to get 10 and 15 inches of rain, and that’s going to challenge our infrastructure. We need to rebuild our infrastructure to protect our residents, protect our critical infrastructure." 

Doctors Increasingly Seek a Cure for Burnout

Sep 5, 2017
Wall Boat via Flickr/CC

While the role of a physician has always been demanding - there's a spike now in doctors who say they're overwhelmed, and spending more time in front of computers than tending to patients. That's contributing to a burnout epidemic, leading to high turnover, early retirement, and greater malpractice risk. We'll find out how doctors in New Hampshire are coping. 


Economist and Harvard professor Mihir Desai uses philosophy, film, literature, and history to analyze finance as an institution built on morality and humanity. His book , The Wisdom of Finance, explores how the financial industry can be understood through culture, and how deeply finance impacts our personal lives. 

This show originally aired on July 25, 2017. 

A Week of Summer Favorites on The Exchange

Aug 30, 2017
woodleywonderworks / Flickr

As we enjoy the last days of summer and gear up for the school year, we bring you a week of summer favorites. We hear our earlier conversation about New Hampshire lakes, taking a deep dive into how policies are keeping Granite State lakes healthy and swimmable. Plus we take a look back at our programs on what teens have been reading this summer, the economic impact of the craft beer boom, and our program updating the health of two beloved New Hampshire species, loons and moose.  

Scott Heron; Flickr

What couldn't have a Week of Summer Favorites without including moose and loons!  For many Granite Staters, these creatures symbolize what makes our wild places special, but both face threats that are reducing their numbers. We'll discuss these threats, and ongoing efforts to support these two beloved N.H. animals.

This show originally aired on August 1, 2017. 

The Economics of New Hampshire's Craft Beer Industry

Aug 29, 2017
Danielle Griscti; Flickr

A Week of Summer Favorites continues with a look at the craft beer boom. Microbrews, nanobrews, tasting rooms, and seasonal pours...independent craft beer is on the rise in New Hampshire, but what is its economic impact? For beer fans and non-drinkers alike, the increase in small breweries is affecting New Hampshire tourism and small-town business growth. 

This show originally aired on August 8, 2017. 

What & How Teenagers Are Reading Today

Aug 28, 2017

Our Week of Summer Favorites continues with a look at teen reading. Smartphones, e-readers, and other internet-based content, like Twitter and Facebook, are changing how and what teenagers read. And despite the image of adolescents with their faces in their phones, it turns out young adult fiction is among the most successful types of books on the market.

  This show originally aired on June 12, 2017.

N.H. Lakes Association

Our Week of Summer Favorites starts with a dive into New Hampshire's lakes.  It's hard to overstate the importance of the state's lakes and ponds -- for recreation, tourism, the environment.  But with several water bodies already posted for cyanobacteria, we look at policies and practices  aimed at keeping lakes healthy -- and why they aren't always followed.

This show originally aired on June 20, 2017.   

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 25, 2017

Aug 24, 2017

Just weeks before the controversial new voting law, known as SB3, is to go into effect, two lawsuits are challenging its constitutionality.  One legal challenge comes from the New Hampshire Democratic Party, the other on behalf of the League of Women Voters of New Hampshire and three individual would-be voters.  

Nine states, including New Hampshire, that are part of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) agree to reduce carbon dioxide emissions an additional 30 percent below 2020 levels by 2030.  

Christopher Cantwell, a white nationalist from Keene, who has been in the headlines since the clashes in Charlottesville, is denied bond by a judge Thursday. He’s being held on three felony charges.

And we get an update on issues in the news in the Lake Sunapee area and in Laconia.

 


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