The Exchange

Live at 9 a.m., repeat at 7 p.m.

The Exchange is New Hampshire's only locally produced statewide call-in talk show. It's hosted by Laura Knoy.

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Click here to get our podcast on Apple Podcasts, and click here to find us on Stitcher.

Want to call in? Here's the number to call between 9-10 AM EST: 800.892.6477

Want to leave us a message? Call this number anytime: 202.649.0835

You can also reach the show by email, by tagging us in a tweet, following us on Instagram, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

Coming Up on The Exchange:

Monday, 6/26 - Distracted Driving

Tuesday, 6/27 - Recent U.S. Supreme Court Decisions

Wednesday, 6/28 -  TBA

Thursday, 6/29 - TBA 

Friday, 6/30 - Weekly N.H. News Roundup
 

Michal Przedlacki / Flickr/CC

The tragic killing of Charlie Sennott's colleague, New Hampshire native James Foley, was the first exposure for most Americans to ISIS, and a turning point for news organizations who send journalists to the front lines.  We speak with Sennott about his latest initiative to train a new generation of international correspondents in the digital age.

This program was originally broadcast on 4/27/16.

The Wolf in Our Backyards

Dec 27, 2016
pexels

The coyote is the stuff of legends, but author Dan Flores says those tales don't come close to capturing its incredible survival story.  We talk with Flores, the author of the new book "Coyote America" and trace the history of the coyote.  Flores calls it "a kind of Manifest Destiny in reverse" where, in the war between coyote and human, the coyote wins - hands down. 

This show originally aired on September 6, 2016. 

Image from the NH Humanities Troy to Baghdad program

This show originally aired on November 22, 2016.

Holiday Book Show: December 6, 2016

Dec 25, 2016
Christina Phillips; NHPR

Our popular holiday tradition takes place on December 6.  We look at the top books of 2016 and discuss best books for gift-giving...and receiving.  Let us know what books you've enjoyed this year by email, by tagging us in a tweet, or sending a message to our Facebook page.

This show originally aired on December 6, 2016. 

MONUSCO / Abel Kavanagh; Flickr

About a dozen Syrians were resettled in New Hampshire last year, and more than 7000 refugees from many countries have come here since the 1980s.  We look at the resettlement process, the challenges both newcomers and their host communities face, and what changes might be in store under a Trump administration.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: December 23, 2016

Dec 22, 2016

It’s our year-end review of the top 2016 news stories in New Hampshire, from politics to precipitation. It was a year in which PFOA. became a household term in many communities, the First In the Nation presidential primary seemed to last forever, and fentanyl made its mark, causing a steep increase in overdose deaths.  We'll also discuss this week's alarming report on the state's child protective services agency.


Holiday Tales and Traditions

Dec 22, 2016
Wikipedia Commons

This year, Christmas Eve and the start of Hanukkah fall on the same day, a rare aligning of the Gregorian and Lunar calendars.  And so, we'll explore the customs and origins of these holidays -- the symbols they share, how they differ, and how much they've borrowed from each other - and from more ancient, Pagan celebrations.


Sky Guys: Winter Solstice Edition

Dec 19, 2016
NASA

Here in the Northern Hemisphere, the winter solstice on Dec. 21 marks the longest night and shortest day of the year. The Sky Guys help us identify what we're seeing in the night sky this month. We remember astronaut and American legend, John Glenn, who died this month at age 95.  He became the first American to orbit the Earth in 1962. And we discuss the top space news stories of 2016.

GUESTS: 

  • Mal Cameron - former astronomy and space educator at the McAuliffe Shepard Discovery Center and coordinator of its NASA Educator Resource Center.
  • John Gianforte – co-founder of the "Astronomical Society" of northern New England and astronomy instructor for Granite State College and UNH.

 


NHPR

Year-end reports show positive trends: from very low unemployment to the addition of 17,000 jobs in 2016. However, rental prices continue to rise, and while the Granite State has plenty of jobs, it badly needs people to fill them.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: December 16, 2016

Dec 16, 2016

Join us for the top Granite State headlines this week, including N.H. political races caught up in revelations about Russian hacking.  Another grim record set as drug deaths in the state reach near 400.  And the state seeks to have a suit against DCYF dismissed in a child abuse case.


Donating Wisely: How to Decide Where to Give

Dec 14, 2016
Pixabay.com

December is the most charitable month of the year, but with more ways to give than ever and an expanding list of causes, how do we decide which organizations to support?  With the advent of social media and "robo-giving," a new generation is changing how we approach philanthropy.  


Pixabay.com

Senior Assistant Attorney General James Boffetti  says New Hampshire should join the 35 or so states that require a license for contractors. 

Speaking on The Exchange, Boffetti said the state’s Consumer Protection Bureau spends an enormous amount of time chasing contractors  who take off with deposits -- without doing any work.   Most often, these involve smaller home improvement jobs -- the construction of a new deck, roofing, or painting. The elderly are particularly vulnerable. 

Sara Plourde; Flickr

A new report from the Coastal Risk and Hazards Commission warns the region's cities and towns to prepare for a future with higher sea-levels and heavier rainstorms.  It recommends communities start planning now to protect property, infrastructure, and public safety. 


U.S. Department of Agriculture; Flickr

It seems more Americans than ever have food allergies these days, especially kids. However,  a recent report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine says questions persist about whether food allergies are really on the rise. For example, the report cites a lot of confusion about what's truly a potentially life-threatening "allergy," which is triggered by the immune system, and what might be an intolerance or a sensitivity, triggered by the digestive system, instead. Meanwhile, new advances in food allergy treatment include patches and oral therapy. 

FLICKR/CC Waltarr

UPDATED & REVISED DECEMBER 16. 

 

On Monday, December 19, barring any extraordinary developments, electors will meet in each state and officially cast their votes for the President and Vice President.  

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Flickr

In New Hampshire, hairdressers need a license but home builders don't. And some say that's a huge problem, allowing unqualified contractors to get away with shoddy work and consumer scams. But others warn that more regulation wouldn't help, and could raise home prices at a time when the state needs affordable housing.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: December 9, 2016

Dec 8, 2016

The state legislature chooses its leadership, election laws are up for examination, and a  hotel on Mt. Washington is considered even as the AMC withdraws it's application for a new hut in Crawford Notch. 

GUESTS:

Pexels

International adoption peaked in 2004: That year, Americans brought 23,000 children from foreign countries into their families. But in the decade since, there's been a remarkable decline. Last year, 5000 kids from other nations were adopted, which is a slide of 70 percent. Theories abound on why this sudden, dramatic drop-off occurred, but researchers say one thing is clear: Many Americans still want to adopt internationally, and they're frustrated that it's become far more difficult. 


Re-Examining the Franklin Pierce Legacy

Dec 7, 2016

Ninety autographed  Franklin Pierce letters recently came up for auction, garnering attention for the New Hampshire-born politician.  We look at his legacy and the context in which he governed, as well as his dubious honor of being known as one of America's worst presidents,  for his mishandling of the issue of slavery leading to the civil war. We also discover items from the New Hampshire Historical Society which gives us some insight into Pierce.


FLICKR Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor-elect Chris Sununu has said tightening voter laws, potentially eliminating same-day registration, is top on his to-do list once he takes office. 

I'm not saying that people are doing things illegally but the system allows for so much grey area in terms of who's a resident, who's not, how long have you been here, same-day voter, what are the checks and balances. It's just about getting that into place....It's  not necessarily about about fraud.  It's about having a system  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President-Elect Trump's statement that "massive voter fraud" occurred in New Hampshire this election has been widely rejected by state officials. But, the issue itself, of the potential for voter fraud, has gained a lot of attention in recent years. We discuss New Hampshire's ballot system. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: December 2, 2016

Dec 1, 2016

A four-way fight for House Speaker requires two rounds of voting. Republicans look to tighten voting laws. And lawmakers in the U.S. House pass a bill setting aside $1 billion for states battling the heroin and opioid addiction crisis.

 


FLICKR/CC J. Stephen Conn

Democrats are doing some soul searching after this election season – not only because of their loss in the Presidential race but because they lost several governorships, including in New Hampshire, capping several years of state-level losses nationwide.

NAFTA, TPP and the Outlook For Trade Under Trump

Nov 30, 2016

Opposition to global trade was a huge theme in the Presidential election, and President-elect Trump promises to renegotiate NAFTA and ditch the TPP on his first day in office.  We look at the implications of possible Trump administration trade policies for U.S. workers, for our international trading partners, and for the economy.


Reedz Malik; Flickr

On the week of World Aids Day, a look at HIV and AIDS in New Hampshire. New preventative methods and ever-improving treatments mean that more patients are living longer, healthier lives. But many challenges remain, including testing and insurance discrimination.


Allegra Boverman; NHPR

For the first time in fourteen years, New Hampshire Democrats lost the governorship to Republicans, who also held onto the legislature.  These trends are playing out at statehouses around the country, with Democrats now controlling the smallest number of legislatures, ever.


Are Parents Trying Too Hard?

Nov 25, 2016

After helicopter parenting and tiger moms, a new book tells American parents to back off!  We talk with  developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik  about her book, The Gardener and The Carpenter.  Gopnik draws on the science of the human brain and evolution to make the argument that children are hard-wired to learn on their own.  We discuss the two possible ways of thinking about the role of parents suggested by the book's title and look at insights the new science offers into the relationship between parents and kids. 

GUEST:   Alison Gopnik, professor of psychology and philosphy at University of California, Berkeley.

  This program was originally broadcast on Oct. 11, 2016.

Wonderland: How Play Made the Modern World

Nov 22, 2016

Necessity isn't always the mother of invention: some of our most important ideas arise out of moments of playful exploration.  We talk with Steven Johnson, the author of a new book called "Wonderland," who contends delight and wonder have had a disproportionate impact on our history and point the way to future innovation. 


The Electoral College: Yea or Nay?

Nov 18, 2016
NHPR

Although rare, the winner of the Oval Office can lose the national popular vote, as we saw this year.  And that's caused many Americans to ask: Does my vote count?  The answer is complicated, and changing the system would be tough. Still, there's no shortage of ideas.  


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: November 18, 2016

Nov 18, 2016

House Republicans are locked in a battle for the speakership after maintaining control of the chamber for another two years. Meanwhile, the recount process begins, with fifteen races scrutinized including one in the state Senate. And the Granite State's unemployment rate of two point eight percent is the lowest in the nation. 


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