Here and Now

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  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hobson

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Public Radio's daily news magazine bringing up-to-date midday news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Connecticut Democrat Chris Murphy ended a nearly 15-hour filibuster early this morning, saying Republican leaders had promised him they will hold votes on amendments to expand gun sale background checks and ban gun sales to people placed on security watch lists.

But NPR’s Sue Davis tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young that Republicans are expected to have enough votes to defeat the measures, even though polling this week shows support is growing for gun control.

Here & Now‘s weeklong series on the state of science in America continues with a look at science literacy, and how much the general public knows about science.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Chad Orzel, associate professor at Union College, about Americans’ basic science understanding, and how much it matters.

Take the Pew Research quiz “How much do you know about science topics?”

Eddie Sotomayor was 34 when he died at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on Sunday. Travel company owner Al Ferguson remembers his employee as a trailblazer in the gay travel industry, organizing the first gay cruise to Cuba this year.

Sotomayor became known in LGBT circles nationally as #tophateddie because he always wore a top hat at travel company events.

Hear more of our Orlando shooting coverage

President Barack Obama will visit Orlando tomorrow to mourn the victims of Sunday’s attack on a gay nightclub that left at least 49 people dead. In December 2012, the president visited another American community to honor the dead in another mass shooting: Newtown, Connecticut.

Twenty children and six adult staff members at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown were killed by Adam Lanza on Dec. 14, 2012. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Nicole Hockley and Mark Barden, who each lost children in the Newtown attack.

In the aftermath of the Orlando shooting, questions remain about how Omar Mateen slipped through an FBI watch. As NPR’s Dina Temple-Raston tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young, a grand jury is meeting to decide whether Mateen’s wife should be charged for failing to alert authorities that her husband was planning an attack.

Hear more of our Orlando shooting coverage

Jobs in the so-called STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math – are growing faster than any other sector of the U.S. economy, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But the U.S. continues to lag other countries in STEM education. Furthermore, new hires in science and tech overwhelmingly tend to be white and Asian men.

There have never been a lot of scientists in Congress, but currently there’s just one: Bill Foster, a Democrat from Illinois, who has a Ph.D. in physics. As part of a week long series about science, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Foster about science policy, funding, and why it’s important for America to be the leader in scientific innovation.

View other stories in our series, “Science In America.” 

As America wrestles to understand the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history, details of Omar Mateen’s life are beginning to emerge. NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the shooter’s possible presence on gay dating apps and in gay clubs and bars.

View all our coverage on the Orlando nightclub shooting.

The Anti-Defamation League has added the Echo symbol — a series of three brackets placed before and after a Jewish name — to its database of hate speech. The symbol has emerged on social media on sites used by white supremacist and other anti-Semitic groups who aim to identify and target Jews, particularly journalists, politicians and celebrities.

President Barack Obama, during remarks at the Treasury Department, pushed back against criticism for not using the term “radical Islamic terrorism” and touched on gun control and the fight against ISIS.

Obama did not use Trump’s, but said, “”Are we going to start treating all Muslim-Americans differently? Are we going to start subjecting them to special surveillance? Are we going to start discriminating them because of their faith? We’ve heard these suggestions during the course of this campaign.”

All this week, Here & Now is speaking with scientists about their research and looking at issues such as science funding, education and innovation.

In part one, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with France Cordova, an astrophysicist and the director of the National Science Foundation.

Interview Highlights: France Cordova

On sustainability of funding to keep the US as a scientific leader:

When you get home from work, you should be relieved and relaxed, right? Instead, a lot of people end up arguing with their partners. Experts say it’s because different people need different things after a stressful day on the job, some want to talk about what happened, others need quiet time.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about what the research tells us about the best way to navigate those differences.

Young boxers in Louisville, Kentucky are remembering Muhammad Ali this week. The boxing legend and humanitarian died last week at the age of 74.

Ali grew up in Louisville. And as Jake Ryan from Here & Now contributor WFPL in Louisville reports, local boxers are finding inspiration from Ali well beyond the ring.

The Supreme Court handed down several decisions today, though not in any of the three most prominent cases still pending this term. The three outstanding cases are all out of Texas: on abortion, affirmative action, and immigration.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dahlia Lithwick, who covers the Supreme Court for Slate, about today’s decisions and what’s left at the court this term.

The New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore announced in a memo this week that it is increasing the annual salary it pays to first-year lawyers, from $160,000 to $180,000, for the first time in nea

Narendra Modi’s three-day visit to the United States features a speech to a joint session of Congress. Modi heads the world’s largest democracy, and is the fifth Indian leader to make such a speech since 1985.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michael Kugleman on what this visit means for relations between the two countries.

1968 was a landmark year in American history. There were riots, assassinations and protests against the war in Vietnam. And it all affected the presidential election that year.

A new book from author Michael A. Cohen digs into the big political players in that drama, and argues that what happened in that 1968 campaign is still being reflected in the politics of today – and this year’s presidential election. Cohen joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to talk about “American Maelstrom: The 1968 Election and the Politics of Division.”

A growing number of Republicans are publicly criticizing likely GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump for insisting that federal judge Gonzalo Curiel cannot objectively rule on two lawsuits against Trump University because the judge has Mexican heritage.

Legal expert David Post tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young that the First Amendment protects Trump’s right to say anything he wants about the judge or the court system, but voters must consider what it means for a presidential candidate to attack judicial independence and the rule of law.

Los Angeles is famous for many things, including its traffic and its traffic helicopters. Rick Dickert is one of the traffic and weather reporters who rides high above the city every morning, watching the city’s streets for the morning commute.

During his latest trip to Los Angeles, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson rode along with Dickert and talked about Los Angeles traffic and how the city is changing.

Nike has long been aggressive in trying to get athletes to sign on to sponsorship deals, but the apparel company is going a step further and turning to the courts.

Nike has sued Boris Berian, the world indoor 800-meter champion, alleging he violated a short-term endorsement contract that expired last December. At issue is his January agreement to accept a New Balance sponsorship.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal about the case and the ramifications for athletes.

Latinos make up 38 percent of California’s population, a larger percentage than even whites. On a national level, polls show Latinos are skeptical and even hostile towards the candidacy of Donald Trump, in part because of the rhetoric he uses to describe Mexico, Mexicans and Latino immigrants.

On Dec. 2, 2015, the city of San Bernardino, California, a city employee and his wife entered the Inland Regional Center armed with semi-automatic weapons and opened fire. Fourteen people were killed; 22 were injured. The terrorist attack left the community in tatters, changing the city and the national dialogue about security and home grown terrorists.

Iran is increasing its oil exports more quickly than many thought possible, according to a report from Reuters. Iran is partnering with Asian and European supertankers to get its product out, after sanctions were lifted in January.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News about what is responsible for a higher level of output than expected.

Summer TV is back, and the big networks, cable networks and streaming services have lots of fresh fare. There’s a new show from the creators of “The Walking Dead.” Simon Cowell returns to “America’s Got Talent.”

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans.

Sumner Redstone, the 93-year-old media mogul, is at the center of an intense corporate legal drama.

Two weeks ago, Redstone fired Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman and board member George Abrams, both longtime confidantes. He also dismissed two former girlfriends and caregivers, one of whom is also launching legal action. His granddaughter Keryn Redstone alleges that these machinations are the work of Shari Redstone, Sumner’s daughter, who she says has swayed him at a time when he’s incapacitated.

The Labor Department reported today that the U.S. economy added only 38,000 jobs in May, far lower than most economists predicted.

While unemployment dropped to 4.7 percent, its lowest rate since November 2007, that’s largely due to more people giving up the search for work. Wall Street opened lower at news of the smallest monthly addition of jobs in almost six years.

Mike Regan, Bloomberg Gadfly columnist, joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti for a closer look at the lackluster jobs numbers and what they mean for the U.S. economy.

More rain is in the forecast for much of Texas, parts of which are experiencing devastating flooding. This comes after a year of seemingly relentless rain and flooding.

A year ago Memorial Day, floods devastated Central Texas. Since then, many cities and towns have been able to rebuild.

But in the small Latino community Martindale, outside of Austin, residents are still struggling. For Here & Now contributor KUT, Vanessa Rancaño reports.

Cindy Howes hosts the Morning Mix on WYEP in Pittsburgh, and she says the music coming out of the city goes beyond the sports bar rock bands that many expect.

Howes joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson for this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions.

The United Arab Emirates, one of the driest countries in the world, wants it to rain more, so the country is looking into building an artificial mountain.

When moist air rises up a mountain, it cools and forms clouds that could produce rain. The UAE has been manipulating the weather in the past few years, seeding clouds to produce more rain.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Bruce Boe, vice president of meteorology at Weather Modification Inc.

The emphasis on standardized testing in schools across the country has many educators worried that some students aren’t learning the basics of reading and writing. That’s leading some districts to try creative methods to increase literacy, particularly for young students in low-income and minority neighborhoods.

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