Monadnock Summer Lyceum

An annual series of cultural lectures at the Unitarian-Universalist Church in Peterborough, NH, featuring prominent speakers from a wide variety of backgrounds and disciplines who discuss topics of importance to our times.

Lectures take place on Sundays and broadcast on NHPR the following Sunday during Best of Public Radio.

Schedule of Events | Email the Monadnock Summer Lyceum | Past Lectures

Matt McKee / Courtesy Monadnock Summer Lyceum

This program will be broadcast on Sunday, August 31 at 9 p.m. 

Lois Lowry has opened the gates of literature for young adults in her classics such as "Number the Stars" and "Anastasia Krupnik," and her brilliant dystopian novel, "The Giver." Her talk at the Lyceum will coincide with the August, 2014, opening of the film version of "The Giver," starring Jeff Bridges and Meryl Streep. Ms. Lowry will speak about her life as a writer, and books that have been pivotal in her career, including "The Giver" and its journey to the screen.

Jon G. Fox / Courtesy Monadnock Summer Lyceum

This program will be broadcast on Sunday, August 24 at 9 p.m. 

Traditional Navajo ceremonies contribute to healing the human body at multiple levels. Navajo healing, using chant, prayer, and guided imagery, has been shown to change how the brain functions (neuroplasticity). The Navajo approach to keeping the physical body strong is a blend of mind-body medicine. The Navajo healing ceremony, an archetype of the Native culture, demonstrates the blend of traditional foods, Native spirituality, and connection within the community and to the natural world.

Courtesy Monadnock Summer Lyceum

This program will be broadcast on Sunday, August 17 at 9 p.m.

Panacea was a Greek goddess with the power to heal wounds and cure sicknesses. Nowadays the word panacea denotes a single solution to a complicated problem. Biology professor Bernd Heinrich views Nature as a panacea to humankind’s problem of surviving happily on this planet. Nature offers models to help understand the causes of diseases, provides chemicals to cure or control them, shows ways to manage our environment, and inspires us.

Courtesy Monadnock Summer Lyceum

This program will be broadcast Sunday, August 10 at 9 p.m. 

Courtesy Monadnock Summer Lyceum

This program will be broadcast Sunday, August 3 at 9 p.m. 

Courtesy Monadnock Summer Lyceum

Originally broadcast Sunday, July 27. 

Growth in manufacturing employment and productivity has improved significantly since the 2008 economic downturn. Is this a temporary phenomenon or a revival? Can American manufacturing recover from the off-shoring phenomenon of the late 1990s and 2000s? Harvard Business School professor Dr. Willy Shih will discuss how the stage is set for improved productivity across the manufacturing sector; potentially leading to a manufacturing renaissance in the United States.

Courtesy Monadnock Summer Lyceum

Originally broadcast Sunday, July 20th. 

We remember Louisa May Alcott as the author of Little Women, the story of four girls growing up in mid-nineteenth century Massachusetts. Alcott was also an abolitionist, a feminist, a Civil War nurse, and a participant in the Transcendental intellectual movement. To help us understand the complete Louisa May Alcott, Marianne Donnelly will bring us her carefully researched Alcott re-enactment, in which Alcott will tell us about her connections to the anti-slavery movement, the Underground Railroad, and the Monadnock region.

via Monadnock Lyceum

Since the posthumous publication of her poems in the 1890’s, Emily Dickinson has been portrayed as a virginal recluse, a mental case, and a victim of a broken heart. Susan Snively’s talk challenges these myths by discussing the poet’s letters to the powerful Judge Otis Phillips Lord, a widower who had been her late father’s best friend. Unpublished until 1954, the letters reveal a playful, tender, passionate Emily, happy in a mutual love that graced her middle age.

via Monadnock Lyceum

Judy Wicks will discuss her evolution as an entrepreneur and how she would not only change her neighborhood, but would also change her world – helping communities far and wide create local living economies that value people, nature and place more than money. Focusing on what it takes to marry social change and commerce, and doing business differently, Judy shows how entrepreneurs, as well as consumers, can follow both mind and heart, cultivate lasting relationships with each other and the planet, and build a new compassionate economy that will bring us greater security, as well as happiness

via Monadnock Lyceum

Bluegrass music is close to America’s musical heart. Its recurring themes of love, loss, and longing for home resonate deeply with the American psyche. The sounds of bluegrass – beginning with the fiddle and banjo - draw on the contributions of America’s diverse immigrant communities, from Europe to Africa.

Created just 70 years ago by professional musicians, bluegrass first raged across the country in the 1940s. It was a driving, supercharged view of American folk roots, named for the style’s creator and his band: Bill Monroe and his Bluegrass Boys.

via Monadnock Lyceum

Life is not a commodity, but a community.  Animals are not our possessions, but our elder siblings, guides and teachers in the larger family of which Homo sapiens is merely a junior member.  Reverend Gary Kowalski shares the journey that led him to appreciate nature as the primordial sacrament and to rediscover the ancient knowledge evident to indigenous people (reconfirmed by the findings of modern biology) that other species are not so different from ourselves, but share in the emotional depths and psychic capacities that make us most fully human.

via Monadnock Lyceum

Drawing on Dietrich Bonhoeffer's concept of "cheap grace," Andrew Bacevich exposes the chronic defects in the current U. S. approach to waging war.  He explains why the world's most powerful military doesn't win and why the nation's reliance on professional soldiers has turned out to be such a bad bargain. When American soldiers deploy to places like Iraq and Afghanistan, what is the cause for which they fight?  The patriotic answer is this:  they fight for freedom.  Challenge that proposition and you’ll likely pick a quarrel.

via Monadnock Lyceum

After the illness and death of her late husband, acclaimed author and National Public Radio correspondent Margot Adler began to read vampire novels as a meditation on mortality. This meditation soon became an obsession. Adler has read over 250 such novels ranging from teen to adult, from detective to romance, from gothic to modern. "Every society creates the vampire it needs," wrote the feminist scholar Nina Auerbach.

via monadnocklyceum.org

Gar Alperovitz calls for an evolution, not a revolution, into a new system that would democratize the ownership of wealth, strengthen communities in diverse ways, and be governed by policies and institutions sophisticated enough to manage a large-scale, powerful economy.

What is the next system? It is not corporate capitalism, not state socialism, but something else— something entirely American, something building on our pragmatic American “can do” spirit that is also sophisticated about what it will ultimately take to alter our corporate dominated system over time.

Keith Weller / via monadnocklyceum.org

*Note: Due to an error on July 7th, we will air this lecture on Sunday, August 18 at 3 p.m. The audio is also available for streaming below. We apologize for any inconvenience.*

-What will healthcare look like in 10 years?

-How can I prepare for the new healthcare landscape?

-What are the best and worst aspects to the new healthcare system ahead?

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on August 26. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

Cambridge University Press

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on August 19. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

Matthew Paulson, via Flickr

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on August 5. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

C. Young Photography, via Flickr

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on July 29. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

Eric Myers, via Flickr

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on July 22. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

Sean Munson, via Flickr

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on July 15. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

Mercy Health, via Flickr

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on July 8. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:
 

Bauhan Publishing

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on July 1. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum: