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Around the Nation
6:47 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Michigan Family Welcomes 12th Child

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer, with an announcement. Michiganders Jay and Teri Schwandt just had their 12th child, and it's a boy, just like his 11 brothers. Little Tucker was nine days late, so they thought he might be a girl - not happening.

Must be a family thing. Teri's sister has 10 children, and they are all boys. Will they try again for lucky 13? We will never close that door, says Teri.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Digital Life
5:22 am
Fri August 9, 2013

New Digital Amber Alerts Could Create A Backlash

Amber Alerts were issued as cellphone text messages in California this week.
NPR

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:20 pm

A couple of nights ago I had just closed my book, turned off my light, and was drifting off to sleep when my cellphone started to shriek. I shot awake and groped for the phone. My sleep-befuddled brain was greeted with this message: "Boulevard, CA Amber Alert update." Then there was a license plate number, and a make and model of the car.

Groggily, I Google this town — Boulevard, Calif. — and discovered it was 541 miles away from my house. That's more than the distance between Washington, D.C., and Detroit. I was mystified. Why was I getting this?

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NPR Story
4:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Astronaut Among Presidential Medal Of Freedom Winners

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Astronaut Sally Ride has served as a role model for many young women as the first American woman in space. That's one of the reasons why she's one of the 16 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Ride is being honored posthumously - she died last year at the age of 61. The White House in a statement said: Sally Ride stood up for racial and gender equality in the classroom and taught students that there are no limits to what they can accomplish.

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NPR Story
4:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Feds Probe If Student Athletes Were Biogenesis Clients

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Major League baseball, this week, sanctioned a number of players, including New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez. They're accused of receiving performance enhancing drugs from a Miami clinic called Biogenesis.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And according to ESPN and other organizations, that clinic also saw high school athletes. Parents have told the sports network they don't know why their children were listed in the clinics records. The lawyer for the owner of Biogenesis declined to comment to ESPN and has not returned calls from NPR.

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NPR Story
4:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Lawlessness Increases In Libya

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And just preserving some semblance of order is the big challenge in neighboring Libya. That country's long-time dictator, Muammar Gaddafi was toppled from power two years ago and now the future of Libya as even a functioning state is in question. There has been increased lawlessness in that country. The militias that ousted Muammar Gaddafi are fighting with each other. A thousand inmates escaped in a prison break and there are assassinations of activists and police.

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Parallels
3:08 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Unease In Sprawling Rio Slum Ahead Of Police 'Pacification'

A police officer patrols the rooftop of a school at the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sept. 20, 2012, where a "pacification" anti-crime effort was underway. Rio police are now going to attempt a similar pacification in another huge slum, Mare.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Brazilian police are preparing to occupy one of the deadliest shantytown complexes in Rio de Janeiro, hoping to drive out drug gangs ahead of next year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.

It's the latest "pacification" effort in a Rio slum, and the city's new chief of police says he'll need some 1,500 cops to secure this one, called Mare.

Police in the past would typically stage raids, but then withdraw from the dangerous shantytowns, known here as favelas. But under the pacification program, they now set up shop inside the favelas.

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Planet Money
3:07 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Tourre Juror: 'We Saw Goldman As The Bigger Problem'

Fabrice Tourre, outside the courtroom. "We didn't feel any malice toward him," one of the jurors said.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Beth Glover was a juror on the trial of former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre. When the lawyers were discussing the mortgages tied to the securities at the center of the case, Glover realized that, for all intents and purposes, they were talking about her mortgage.

"When they were looking at the subprime mortgage groupings, I think I would have been in one of those," Glover told me. "I didn't have as great as FICO score at that time."

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The Salt
3:05 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Old Hawaiian Menus Tell Story Of Local Fish And Their Demise

Colorful covers of menus from the Royal Hawaiian Hotel (left) and the Monarch Room Royal Hawaiian Hotel.
New York Public Library

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:53 pm

In the early to mid-1900s, the islands of Hawaii were a far-away, exotic destination. People who managed to get there often kept mementos of that journey including kitschy menus from Hawaiian fine dining restaurants and hotels like like Trader Vic's and Prince Kuhio's.

Now these old menus are serving a purpose beyond colorful relics from the past. Kyle Van Houtan, an ecologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, says he's found a scientific purpose for the menus.

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StoryCorps
1:17 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Surviving Tragedy: 'It Brought Us Closer'

Ondelee at home before his prom. In Chicago, prom night is a big deal. Fifty percent of African-American Chicago high school students end up dropping out of high school before senior year. Ondelee graduated from Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago on June 15, and is planning to attend college.
Carlos Javier Ortiz Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

One night in 2009, Ondelee Perteet and a friend went to a party in his hometown of Chicago.

"A lot of people, they started throwing gang signs. And, you know, I got into an argument with somebody in the party, and that's when I got shot in the face," Ondelee said during a recent visit to StoryCorps with his mother, Detreena.

He was 14.

"I got to the hospital, and the doctor came back, and he said, 'We're sorry, but he's never going to move his arms and legs again,' " said Detreena, 47. "It just tore me apart."

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Europe
6:53 am
Thu August 8, 2013

'Magic Flute' Singers End Up In Lake Constance

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In Mozart's opera "The Magic Flute," Tamino and Pamina can't get married unless brave Tamino passes three tests or trials. At a performance on Lake Constance in Austria this week, the trials by silence and fire were no sweat but water turned out to be a bit trickier. As a gondola carrying three characters approached the floating stage it capsized, tossing the three into the lake's shallow waters. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:32 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Republicans And Democrats Get Behind 'Voices For Yes'

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:54 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Republicans and Democrats agree. Strategists who worked on opposing campaigns are urging the Twitterverse to just say yes to the candidacy of the progressive rock band, Yes. Plus, a Facebook page, a website, a documentary, all to get the Rock 'n' roll Hall of Fame to say yes to Yes. Is our national polarization at an end? Or perhaps "The Gates of Delirium" have opened.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:31 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Rain Pounds Missouri Town, Floods Rivers

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:43 am

In Missouri, several communities have been ravaged by flooding. Among the hardest hit has been Waynesville. The town of about 5,000 people has been hit by rain storms — including some 7 inches on Tuesday, and another 6 inches Wednesday. Nearby rivers and creeks have overflowed.

Europe
4:31 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Former Soviet Republic's Democratic Transition Questioned

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It was five years ago that the U.S. was chastising Russia over its invasion of the former Soviet Republic of Georgia. Russian tanks had moved across the border after Georgian forces tried to re-take a separatist region, a region which Russia backed. There is still tensions between the countries, but last year Georgian voters elected a new prime minister who pledged to improve ties with Moscow.

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U.S.
4:31 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Kerry, Hagel To Meet Russian Counterparts On Friday

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 5:41 am

The U.S. has canceled plans for an Obama-Putin summit because Russia granted temporary asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden. But Secretary of State John Kerry and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel will go ahead with plans to meet their counterparts in Washington.

Code Switch
3:49 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Science Rap B.A.T.T.L.E.S. Bring Hip-Hop Into The Classroom

Jayda Neor and Kephra Shaw Meredith, seventh-graders from KIPP Bridge middle school in Oakland, Calif., perform a rap song about the discovery of DNA's structure in front of a green screen.
Tom McFadden

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 12:48 pm

This story comes to us from our friends at the science desk. They produced the 7-minute video documentary you see above.

"Modern-day rappers — all they talk about is money, and all these unnecessary and irrelevant topics," says Victoria Richardson, a freshman at Bronx Compass High School. Richardson's rhymes tackle a much less-popular subject: DNA.

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