Morning Edition

Weekdays at 5 am
Steve Inskeep & Renée Montagne
Rick Ganley

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

Today on Morning Edition:

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Rick Ganley
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Business
5:25 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Obama Names OMB Controller As Acting IRS Commissioner

On Thursday, President Obama named Daniel Werfel, 42, acting IRS commissioner. The announcement comes a day after the resignation of Steven Miller, who got caught up in the controversy over the IRS targeting Tea Party groups.

Around the Nation
5:14 am
Fri May 17, 2013

After Shooting, New Orleans Area Begins To Return To Normal

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 11:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some other news, New Orleans police have arrested six people after last Sunday's shooting spree at a Mother's Day parade. Two of those suspects, brothers, face 20 counts of attempted murder after 20 people were injured. The shooting galvanized residents of a city with one of the world's higher murder rates. Keith O'Brien has the story.

KEITH O'BRIEN, BYLINE: Residents at the intersection of Frenchman and North Villere Streets were thrilled to see it yesterday morning, a produce truck selling fruits and vegetables, door to door.

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Afghanistan
5:14 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Select Young Afghans Chosen As Commandoes In Training

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 2:11 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All right, through much of this week, we've been hearing from young Afghans on the future of their country after NATO troops withdraw in 2014. Yesterday, our colleague Renee Montagne met with the American general who commands coalition forces in Afghanistan. They traveled to a special forces base where young Afghan men - and a few women - are being trained.

(SOUNDBITE OF HELICOPTER)

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Commentary
5:14 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Kiss In 'Bombay Talkies' Breaks New Ground In Bollywood

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 6:31 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This weekend, the Cannes Film Festival pays tribute to the 100th anniversary of Indian movies. It will host the world premier of a film called "Bombay Talkies." Commentator Sandip Roy says one scene in that movie breaks new ground for Bollywood.

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StoryCorps
3:06 am
Fri May 17, 2013

A Gift Of Life And Friendship After A Family's Loss

Six years ago, Rick Bounds was told he would die without a kidney and liver transplant. Today he is a triathlete, thanks to donor organs from Dorothy Biernack's late husband, Marty.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 5:14 am

Today, Rick Bounds is a 58-year-old triathlete, with four competitions and a 100-mile bike ride to his credit.

But six years ago, he was diagnosed with a nonhepatitis liver disease. Rick's doctors told him that if he didn't have an immediate kidney and liver transplant, he would die.

He was given eight months to live and told that his chances of getting organs were slim.

'No Hope'

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Planet Money
3:04 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Why Is There An Ammunition Shortage In The U.S.?

"We're going to keep prices as fair as we possibly can," says Bob Viden of Bob's Little Sport Shop in southern New Jersey.
Marianne McCune NPR

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 10:04 pm

Sales of guns and ammunition rose after President Obama took office in 2008, and they went through the roof starting late last year, when a school shooting led to a push for new gun control measures. That's led to a prolonged ammunition shortage, even with manufacturers running at full capacity.

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Politics
3:03 am
Fri May 17, 2013

AP Case Adds To Obama Team's Tough Record On Leaks

President Obama speaks during a news conference in the White House Rose Garden on Thursday. He told reporters: "Leaks related to national security can put people at risk."
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 9:34 am

President Obama had a reputation when he took office as a liberal former constitutional lawyer who had condemned Bush-era national security policies.

But he has proven to be even tougher than President George W. Bush on prosecuting national security leaks. The seizure of Associated Press phone records is just the latest example.

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Parallels
3:00 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Are Buddhist Monks Involved In Myanmar's Violence?

Some Muslims say Buddhist monks have been inciting followers during recent violence in Myanmar. Monk U Wirathu acknowledges that he is a Buddhist nationalist but says he has tried to prevent fighting. He's shown here at the Masoeyein monastery in Mandalay, Myanmar, on March 27.
Gemunu Amarasinghe AP

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 10:05 pm

In the Western stereotype, Buddhists are meditating pacifists who strive to keep their distance from worldly passions. But last month, more than 40 people were killed in fighting between Buddhists and Muslims in the central Burmese town of Meiktila. Witnesses say some Buddhist monks joined in the violence, while others tried to stop it.

One prominent monk in particular has been blamed for being behind it.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Sam Amidon: Reshaping An American Folk Tradition

Sam Amidon's new album is titled Bright Sunny South.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 9:55 am

Shape-note singing is a communal form of music that began in New England 200 years ago, mostly from townsfolk without any musical training. It's music that surrounded folk singer Sam Amidon during his childhood in Vermont.

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Something Wild
12:07 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Phenology Happens in the Field

A plot of blue bead lillies.

We tagged along with Diane DeLuca, a biologist with NH Audubon on her rounds of the Deering Wildlife Sanctuary. DeLuca has been working on their Phenological Monitoring Pilot Project, and defines phenology as "the study of 'phenophases', which are the different phases that plants and animals go through in their life cycle each year." 

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Birdsong, Translated

American Robin. Their whistled song is often translated as, "Cheer up. Cheerily. Cheerio."
Ashour Rehana Flickr/Creative Commons

With birds tuning up for the breeding season ahead, here are some memory tricks to help you recognize a few of the more common songs.

Robins can be heard in just about all habitats across the state and the nation. Their whistled song is often translated as, "Cheer-up. Cheerily. Cheerio."

Another song easy to "translate" is the flight song of goldfinches. Someone somewhere interpreted it as, "Potato chip! Potato chip!"    

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Around the Nation
6:50 am
Thu May 16, 2013

New York Cat Is Finally Reunited With Owner

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Here's a classic cat-rescued-from-the-tree story - I mean, sort of. Luna is a black-and-white feline who wandered off from his owner in Queens and ended up stuck in a tree. A New York City police officer who came to the rescue got stuck in the tree, too. Cat and man were rescued by the fire department.

World
6:44 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Some Leaders In Saudi Arabia Condemn Twitter

Religious authorities responded after Saudis used Twitter to show images of human rights activists on trial. The BBC reports the kingdom's most senior cleric called Twitter users "fools." The head of the religious police says any social media user will lose the afterlife.

Business
4:33 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Researchers Don't 'Wine' About The Cold, Their Grapes Thrive

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 5:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Minnesota. Vermont. South Dakota. OK. These are not states people normally associate with fantastic wine - or wine at all, for that matter. Grapes didn't always ripen in the state's short growing season. And even when they did, the grapes were better suited for jelly and juice. Their musty taste left little to really desire in a glass of wine.

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Politics
4:24 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Focus On Women, Families Propels New York's Sen. Gillibrand

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand greets panel members from the military and the Defense Department testifying on Capitol Hill on March 13 before the subcommittee's hearing on sexual assault in the military.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 10:31 am

Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York is introducing legislation with other lawmakers Thursday that would change how the military handles sexual assault cases. The proposal would let military prosecutors — rather than commanders — decide whether to bring serious military crimes to trial.

It's the latest high-publicity move for a senator who was virtually unknown four years ago when she was appointed to fill Hillary Clinton's senate seat. Now, she's on some lists for possible candidates for vice president — even president.

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