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Rick Ganley

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Business
5:53 am
Tue August 28, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. Microsoft had to know there would be critics when it released its new logo late last week. And today's last word in business is: mixed reviews.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Microsoft used the old logo for 25 years. The tech world has certainly changed a lot since then. PCs, not iPads, where the big thing then and Microsoft dominated the software for them. Now, Microsoft says it's time to change its look.

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Election 2012
3:58 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Gov. Haley Gets Prime-Time Convention Speaking Slot

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley campaigns in Ann Arbor, Mich., on July 31 for Mitt Romney.
Charles V. Tines AP

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:32 am

Among the speakers with a prime-time slot at the Republican National Convention in Tampa this week is South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley. The speech could propel her into national politics.

The talk about Haley always mentions her gender, her age — 40 — and her race — Indian-American. She wears the labels proudly, and for $19.95 you can read all about them in her memoir Can't Is Not an Option. But there's another label Haley likes: fighter.

On Comedy Central not long ago, she mixed it up with fellow South Carolinian Stephen Colbert:

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Sports
3:29 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Heat Guidelines Help Keep Young Athletes Cool

Doctoral student Brett Comstock wears a football uniform as he walks on a treadmill at the Korey Stringer Institute at the University of Connecticut.
Craig LeMoult for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 4:07 pm

As extremely hot temperatures continue to hit much of the country, high school football teams are busy getting ready for the fall season.

Last year, five high school football players died of heat stroke. Across the country, experts are trying to prevent those kinds of tragedies.

At the University of Connecticut's Korey Stringer Institute, researchers study the effects of extreme heat on athletes.

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The Salt
3:28 am
Tue August 28, 2012

In India, 100-Year-Old Lunch Delivery Service Goes Modern

Dabba wallahs carry lunchboxes to offices in Indian cities. But the old tradition is changing with modern times.
Aijaz Rahi AP

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:37 am

Every day in Mumbai, some 5,000 deliverymen called dabba wallahs hand deliver 200,000 hot meals to doorsteps across the city. It's an intricate network that requires precise timing and numerous handoffs from courier to courier. The century-old service is a staple for the city's office workers. (See how it works in this video.) But as the city has changed, so too has the service.

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Energy
3:14 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Methane Making An Appearance In Pa. Water Supplies

Ted and Gale Franklin live in Leroy Township, Pa., where people have been dealing with flammable gas puddles and tainted well water.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 3:03 pm

Mike and Nancy Leighton's problems began on May 19, just as Mike was settling in to watch the Preakness Stakes. A neighbor in Leroy Township, Pa., called Mike and told him to check the water well located just outside his front door.

"I said, 'I'll be down in 15 minutes.' I wanted to see the race," Leighton said. But as the horses were racing, Leighton's well was overflowing. Typically, there's between 80 to 100 feet of head space between the top of the well and its water supply. But when Leighton went outside, the water was bubbling over the top.

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U.S.
3:13 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Helping Foster Kids Even After Adoption

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:32 am

Say "adoption" and many Americans think "babies." The U.S. system was largely organized around placing infants, both from this country and abroad. It turns out that, by far, the largest number of adoptions in the U.S. is through the foster care system. That means toddlers, young children, even teens.

Yet many in the field say the system does little to help families cope with the special issues a number of these children will face, even years after adoption.

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Africa
3:12 am
Tue August 28, 2012

Somaliland: A Pocket Of Stability In A Chaotic Region

Bundles of Somaliland's own currency bills are laid out by a money-changer on a street in Hargeisa, capital of the unrecognized breakaway republic of Somaliland in northwestern Somalia. Investors are beginning to move into the untapped market in Somaliland, a stable island in a turbulent region.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:32 am

Somalia is synonymous with failed states, pirates and Islamist militants. But in the nation's northwest lies a peaceful, stable territory with an elected government known as Somaliland. The enclave broke away from the fractious Horn of Africa nation in 1991 and has been going it alone ever since.

To the disappointment of its residents, Somaliland has not been recognized as an independent nation, but its stability is attracting investors that other parts of Somalia can only dream of.

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Around the Nation
7:12 am
Mon August 27, 2012

United Flight Attendant, 83, Ends 63-Year Career

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:51 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Ocean City, Md., Falls Short Of Bikini Record

A Chinese city set the record for the most women to participate in a parade while wearing bikinis. Over the weekend, Ocean City, Md., set out to break the record of 1,085 — but fell far short at 325. Organizers blame the rainy weather for holding down turnout.

Business
5:20 am
Mon August 27, 2012

New Hampshire, A Low-Cost Massachusetts?

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 10:56 am

New Hampshire's economy is comparatively strong these days, but that strength varies depending on where you are in the small state. The closer you get to its border with Massachusetts, the more robust the economic activity. The state has been aggressive about marketing the so-called "New Hampshire Advantage."

Remembrances
5:18 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Astronaut Neil Armstrong 'Embodied Our Dreams'

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 10:56 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

NEIL ARMSTRONG: That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's remember the man who spoke those words on the moon. Neil Armstrong died on Saturday after a lifetime that inspired many people, including Neil DeGrasse Tyson, director of New York's Hayden Planetarium who is on the line. Good morning. Welcome back to the program.

NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON: Yeah, good morning. Thanks for having me back.

INSKEEP: So how did you meet Neil Armstrong?

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Analysis
5:18 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:47 am

The Republican National Convention will come to order at 2 p.m. in Tampa, Fla., and then quickly go into recess. Because of Tropical Storm Isaac, the main events have been delayed until Tuesday. This is the second convention in a row where the GOP had to delay the opening because of bad weather.

Around the Nation
4:56 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Gulf Coast States Brace For Isaac's Fury

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 5:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Florida has so far been spared the worst of Tropical Storm Isaac. Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana cannot be so sure. If the storm stays on its current course, it threatens to hit Louisiana seven years to the day after Hurricane Katrina arrived in New Orleans. NPR's Greg Allen is tracking the storm. He's on the line from Florida this morning.

Greg, good morning.

GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: Morning, Steve.

INSKEEP: How much damage was there from Isaac in Florida?

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Europe
4:56 am
Mon August 27, 2012

2 Pussy Riot Members Flee Russia

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 5:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Russia, three members of a feminist punk band are preparing to appeal their two-year prison sentences. The young women were convicted 10 days ago of hooliganism after staging a protest in Moscow's main Orthodox cathedral. The group, Pussy Riot, also announced on Twitter yesterday that two other members who took part in that protest have fled the country to avoid being arrested. The tweet came after police said they were still searching for the activists, who are part of a broader opposition to Russia's President Vladimir Putin.

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Business
4:56 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Samsung Shares Drop After Patent Verdict

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 6:35 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Samsung's slip.

This is the first trading day since Apple's win in a huge American patent battle with competitor Samsung. This weekend, the South Korean company was ordered to pay more than $1 billion in damages after a California jury found it copied features of Apple's iPhone and iPad.

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