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Rick Ganley

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

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Space
7:48 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Toothbrush Fixes Space Station Problem

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a story of a stellar MacGyvering. The International Space Station was faced with a malfunctioning electrical unit and couldn't screw down a new one because the exterior bolts were covered in debris. After two astronauts were stuck outside for hours, they hit on an idea - scrub the bolts clean with a toothbrush. It was a thrifty fix for the $100 billion space station and luckily the toothbrush was a spare. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

World
7:42 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Hummer Driver Diverts Potentially Fatal Crash

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Arts & Culture
6:30 am
Fri September 7, 2012

NH this Weekend: Festivals

Hippo Editor Amy Diaz tells us about two major festivals featuring food and music (and lots of both). Read more about the Manchester Music Festival here, and the Hampton Beach Seafood Festival here.   


Business
6:12 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Amazon Rolls Out Its New Kindle E-Readers

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new line of tablet readers is at the top of NPR's business news.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: They come from Amazon, which is rolling out its latest Kindle e-readers. They are faster, we're told, as well as cheaper. And as NPR's Steve Henn reports, they're aimed squarely at the youngest members of the family.

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Election 2012
4:46 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Obama Wants 4 More Years To Fix Nation's Problems

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

As he accepted his party's nomination for a second term last night, President Obama said that building a better future will take him more time.

MONTAGNE: The president told his supporters at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte that the progress he'd made so far would be reversed if Mitt Romney won the White House.

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Around the Nation
4:39 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Vermont Town Divided Over Hosting Air Force's F-35s

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 11:03 am

Many air bases across the country are clamoring to get the next generation of fighter jets. But the Burlington, Vt. area is bitterly divided over being one of the Air Force's preferred locations. Some residents say there are enough problems already with the F-16s — like noise.

Sports
4:39 am
Fri September 7, 2012

2012 Paralympics Best-Attended Since Games Began

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This year's Paralympics have been the best-attended games since the movement began back in 1960. Over 4,200 athletes from 164 countries are taking part in games that end this weekend. Disabled athletes began competing after World War II when a doctor in Britain organized the international wheelchair games to coincide with the 1948 London Olympics. Tanni Grey Thompson is one of Britain's most successful paralympians.

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Politics
4:39 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Next President Will Still Have To Work With Congress

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Throughout this program we've been hearing parts of President Obama's speech. The people watching that speech in Charlotte last night included Ramesh Ponnuru. He writes for National Review and for Bloomberg. And in a column this week he predicted that if President Obama should win reelection the next four years will look a lot like the past two.

Welcome back to the program, Mr. Ponnuru.

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The Salt
3:24 am
Fri September 7, 2012

When It Comes To Buying Organic, Science And Beliefs Don't Always Mesh

A shopper surveys the produce at Pacifica Farmers Market in Pacifica, Calif., in 2011.
AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:10 pm

We heard from a lot of you — and we mean a lot of you — about our recent report on the Stanford School of Medicine analysis of several studies on the health effects of organic foods.

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Planet Money
3:23 am
Fri September 7, 2012

This Man Makes Beautiful Suits, But He Can't Afford To Buy One

See photos of Peter Frew and other tailors in this slide show from The New York Times Magazine.
Marvin Orellana The New York Times

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:15 am

Peter Frew is one of a tiny number of people left in the United States who can — entirely on his own, using almost no machinery — make a classic bespoke suit. He can measure you, draw a pattern, cut the fabric and then hand-stitch a suit designed to fit your body perfectly.

Frew spent more than a decade as an apprentice for a remarkable tailor in his native Jamaica. He now sells his suits for about $4,000. Since New York is filled with very rich people who see their suits as an essential uniform, Frew has all the orders he can handle.

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The Salt
3:22 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Panera Sandwich Chain Explores 'Pay What You Want' Concept

This Panera Cares store in Chicago switched from for-profit to nonprofit this summer, and it started asking customers to pay whatever they want.
Niala Boodhoo for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:11 pm

The concept of "pay what you want" for goods and services is a nostalgic throwback to the days when people trusted one another just a little bit more, and it's something you expect to see at the occasional farm stand or at a hip, independent coffee shop.

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Dead Stop
3:07 am
Fri September 7, 2012

'Gatsby' Author Fitzgerald Rests In A D.C. Suburb

The grave of The Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald lies next to a major thoroughfare for commuters between Rockville, Md., and Washington, D.C.
Jess Gitner NPR

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 2:55 pm

Every weekday, thousands of commuters to the nation's capital drive past the grave of a celebrated American author, and it's a good bet they don't realize it.

F. Scott Fitzgerald, the author of The Great Gatsby, was born in St. Paul, Minn.; he's associated with that city, as well as Paris, the Riviera and New York. But he's buried in Rockville, Md., outside Washington, D.C., next to a highway between strip malls and train tracks.

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StoryCorps
3:05 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Boy Grows Close To Grandmother, Through Memories

Graham Haggett, 11, and his mother, Shelli Wright, remembered Graham's grandmother Sandra Lee Wright, who was killed in the World Trade Center attacks. Graham brought "Lammy," a stuffed animal his grandmother gave him, to the interview.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 3:23 pm

Graham Haggett was just 10 weeks old when his grandmother Sandra Lee Wright was killed in the World Trade Center attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. But he knows a lot about her, mainly from the stories his mother, Shelli Wright, has told him.

"Somebody described her to me once," Shelli says, "as the kind of person that when she walks in the room, the temperature goes up by 10 degrees."

Sandra Lee Wright worked for Aon Corp., a risk management and insurance company with offices close to the top of the World Trade Center's south tower. She was 57 when she died.

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Hawks Aloft

Courtesy Ned Harris via Flickr/Creative Commons

Once again, it's broad-winged hawk migration time. Whirpools of hawks soon will fill the sky, riding high on thermal lift as sun warms earth. When lift plays out they stream south in an orderly, and countable, procession.

New Hampshire Audubon does just that - count the hawks - at Carter Hill Orchard in Concord and atop Pack Monadnock at Miller State Park in Peterborough.

Here's what Henry Walters, the official counter at Pack Monadnock, wrote two years ago on September 18:

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Europe
10:17 am
Thu September 6, 2012

European Central Bank Announces Euro Plan

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 12:02 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

OK, over in Europe there's been a lot debate on what to do about the troubled currency. And today the European Central Bank announced a new plan to bolster the euro at a meeting in Frankfurt. Bank president Mario Draghi is under immense pressure to prevent the collapse of Europe's monetary union. The bank did not lower interest rates, as some investors hoped, but did unveil steps to ease the eurozone's debt crisis. NPR's Jim Zarroli is in Germany, following the events, and he joins us now. Good morning.

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