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Rick Ganley

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

Today on Morning Edition:

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Revolutionary Road Trip
5:00 am
Tue June 12, 2012

After Libya's War, Acts Of Vengeance

A destroyed apartment building in Tawargha, south of the Libyan coastal city of Misrata. Rebels from Misrata destroyed Tawargha, accusing residents of supporting Moammar Gadhafi and committing atrocities.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 12:05 pm

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is taking a Revolutionary Road Trip across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves. Steve and his team are traveling some 2,000 miles from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya and on to Egypt's megacity of Cairo. Near the Libyan coastal city of Misrata, he looks at violence that took place after the revolution.

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National Security
2:58 am
Tue June 12, 2012

As Drone Strikes Grow, So Do Concerns Over Use

An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field in southern Afghanistan on Jan. 31, 2010. Drones have become the U.S. weapon of choice in the fight against terrorism. But as the technology of this new form of warfare improves, so do concerns about how others will use it in the future.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 10:28 am

Without question, drones have become the U.S. weapon of choice in the fight against terrorism. Counterterrorism officials say they've come to rely on the pilotless aircraft for their surveillance capability and what officials say is precision targeting. That reliance has led to greater use in the past couple of years, especially in Pakistan and Yemen.

John Bellinger, a State Department legal adviser during the George W. Bush administration, says there are increasing concerns about the frequency of drone attacks.

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Author Interviews
2:50 am
Tue June 12, 2012

What Animals Can Teach Humans About Healing

When wildfires swept across Australia in February 2009, this photo of a firefighter sharing his water with an injured koala captured hearts around the world. The koala later died — not of fire-related injuries, but of chlamydia. Koalas in Australia are suffering from an epidemic of chlamydia, says Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz. "There's no such thing as safe sex in the wild."
Mark Pardew AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 8:18 am

When Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz was asked to treat an exotic little monkey with heart failure at the Los Angeles Zoo, she learned that monkeys can suffer heart attacks from extreme stress — just like humans. That's when the cardiologist realized she'd never thought to look beyond her own species for insights into disease.

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The Record
12:23 am
Tue June 12, 2012

Egypt's Underground Wakes Up

Noor Noor performs with his band El-Zabaleen, which makes many of its instruments out of recycled materials.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:42 pm

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Election 2012
6:54 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Fundraising By Text Message

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 11:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE HOST: If you've ever felt a sudden urge to give money to a politician but you just couldn't get to your checkbook or your computer in time, well, the Federal Election Commission is getting ready to help. The Commission today might approve a proposal to allow contributions via mobile phone. Here's NPR's Peter Overby.

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Health Care
6:41 am
Mon June 11, 2012

For Uninsured In Ore., A Flat Fee For Health Care

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 11:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the U.S., as we all know, getting basic health care can be financially out of reach for many people who don't have insurance. Some doctors are trying to fill that need by charging patients a flat monthly fee for medical care.

From Oregon, we have story about one of those medical clinics where the doctor is effectively on retainer. Rachael McDonald of member station KLCC reports.

RACHAEL MCDONALD, BYLINE: Steven Kennedy sits in an exam room with Dr. Steven Butdorf. He's getting a physical.

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Around the Nation
6:39 am
Mon June 11, 2012

A Comeback For Downtown Cleveland

Outdoor dining spaces are filled on a warm spring day on E. 4th Street in downtown Cleveland. Like many former industrial towns, downtown Cleveland has seen a revival in the last few years to become an urban hotspot.
Joshua Gunter The Plain Dealer

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 11:11 am

Almost 11 years ago, Phil Alexander opened his company, BrandMuscle, in the affluent Cleveland suburb of Beachwood.

The company sells marketing software to corporate clients worldwide, and its offices have a lean, energetic vibe, with 20-somethings tossing around ideas in multiscreened meeting rooms or a comfortable coffee bar.

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Revolutionary Road Trip
4:44 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Looking To The Future, Libya Erases Part Of Its Past

A map of the oil pipelines at Al-Sidrah. The man pointing to the map is Abujala Zenati, who had retired as manager of the operation. He says he returned to work after the revolution to help support the new Libya.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 11:11 am

NPR Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep is taking a Revolutionary Road Trip across North Africa to see how the countries that staged revolutions last year are remaking themselves. Steve and his team are traveling some 2,000 miles from Tunisia's ancient city of Carthage, across the deserts of Libya and on to Egypt's megacity of Cairo. In his first story from Libya, he looks at what has changed in a country that was dominated for decades by one man.

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Middle East
4:42 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Court's Ruling May Force Africans To Leave Israel

African migrants line up to receive a free hot meal provided by a group of Israelis called Soup Levinsky in Levinsky Park in Tel Aviv on Sunday. A court in Jerusalem ruled that Israel could deport South Sudanese nationals back to their home country.
JIim Hollander EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 9:00 am

An Israeli court last week upheld a government plan to deport all South Sudanese residents now living in the country, a move that comes amid a wider government crackdown on the 60,000 African nationals who've entered Israel illegally over the past few years.

Human rights groups have objected to Israel's handling of the Africans, saying the government does not do enough to differentiate between economic migrants and genuine asylum-seekers.

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Planet Money
4:39 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Three Ways To Stop A Bank Run

This is what you don't want.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 11:11 am

There's a slow-motion bank run happening in Europe, as depositors move their money from financially troubled countries like Greece and Spain to stronger countries like Germany.

Banks take depositors' money and lend it out. So even a strong bank is in trouble if all the depositors suddenly decide to pull their money out. A full-blown run can sink a bank in an afternoon.

Once a run starts, there are basically three ways to stop it.

1. Slow it down

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Shots - Health Blog
4:34 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Doctors Deploy Shots And Drugs Against Whooping Cough Outbreak

A nurse in Washington administers the whooping cough vaccine to a child in May. In response to the epidemic, more than 82,000 adults have also received the vaccine this year.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:45 pm

A couple of weeks ago I got an e-mail from my son's middle school alerting families that several students had been diagnosed with whooping cough, also called pertussis. I didn't pay too much attention; my son has been vaccinated and he got a booster shot a couple of years ago so I hoped he would be protected.

Then I started to cough.

A visit to my doctor and a pertussis test confirmed that I am one of the 338 people infected with it in Oregon this year. That's three times higher than last year.

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Dead Stop
4:33 am
Mon June 11, 2012

'Bill W.' Day Celebrates Alcoholics Anonymous Hero

Visitors to Bill Wilson's grave in Vermont often leave sobriety chips atop his headstone, marking how long they have been continuously sober.
Steve Zind NPR

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:45 pm

Alcoholics Anonymous has long been known for the anonymity of its members. But there are two key figures in AA's history whose names are well known.

One is co-founder Bill Wilson, known as "Bill W." Beginning in the 1930s, Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith began helping other alcoholics in order to maintain their own sobriety.

Wilson's simple grave in Vermont makes no mention of his work. That doesn't stop people from visiting it, especially on this annual Bill W. Day. But people seek out Wilson's grave in a small cemetery near his birthplace in East Dorset, Vt., all year long.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:31 am
Mon June 11, 2012

To Sniff Out Childhood Allergies, Researchers Head To The Farm

Contact with animals and dirty environments may be one reason farm kids are less likely to get allergies, researchers say.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 11:11 am

Allergies are on the rise these days, especially in children. Nearly half of all kids are now allergic to something, be it food, animals, or plants. Federal health officials say that rate is two to five times higher than it was 30 years ago.

And as researchers are trying to understand why, they're increasingly looking at kids who grow up on farms.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Mon June 11, 2012

The Tallest Man On Earth: Tired Of Running

There's No Leaving Now, Kristian Matsson's newest album as The Tallest Man on Earth, comes out Tuesday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 11:11 am

Swedish singer-songwriter Kristian Matsson performs as The Tallest Man on Earth. That's just his stage name, though: Matsson himself stands at about 5 feet 7. His new album, There's No Leaving Now, comes out Tuesday.

Matsson has been praised as a poet, and is frequently compared to Bob Dylan. He often sings about nature, inspired by the scenery near his home in Falun, Sweden.

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NPR Story
12:38 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

'Car Talk' Brothers To Close Up Shop

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 3:03 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Don't drive like my brother. That's the sign off heard each week at the end of NPR's most popular program. Were talking, of course, about CAR TALK. Brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi have been dispensing humorous auto advice on the radio for more than 25 years. But today, the duo said they're putting the breaks on the program. In October they'll call it quits and no longer record new episodes.

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