Morning Edition

Weekdays at 5 am
Steve Inskeep & Renée Montagne
Rick Ganley

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

Today on Morning Edition:

Local Host(s): 
Rick Ganley
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182ad01e1c8493049eeb9eb|5182acf6e1c8493049eeb9c0

Pages

Afghanistan
5:14 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Afghan Peace Council Charged With Bringing Taliban Into The Fold

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 7:33 am

Reporting from Afghanistan, Morning Edition's Renee Montagne talks to Salahuddin Rabbani. President Hamid Karzai recently appointed him chairman of the High Peace Council, which is tasked with negotiating with the Taliban. Rabbani replaced his father who was assassinated last year by a suspected Taliban member.

Business
5:14 am
Fri May 11, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 7:40 am

According to a survey by the National Retail Federation, mothers will be treated to a little more this holiday. All told, American consumers are expected to spend about $18.6 billion on the moms, stepmoms or grandmas in their lives.

Election 2012
2:51 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Obama, Romney In The Ring For Nevada's Latino Vote

Caroline Maya, a 21-year-old college student, registers to vote for the first time at the Latinos for Obama booth outside the Grand Sierra Casino in Reno, Nev., Saturday.
David Welna NPR

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 7:10 am

President Obama is giving a speech about the economy Friday in Reno, Nev. It's his third trip to Nevada this year. In 2008, he won the state by 12 percentage points — in large part by getting more than three-quarters of the Latino vote.

Read more
Author Interviews
2:50 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Deford: How Sportswriting Has Changed 'Over Time'

Atlantic Monthly Press

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 7:10 am

NPR listeners normally hear from sports commentator Frank Deford for three minutes at a time Wednesday mornings, as he opines on the latest follies of the sporting world. But Deford fans have been getting to hear the veteran sportswriter at greater length lately. He's on a book tour for his new memoir, Over Time: My Life as a Sportswriter. When Deford stopped in Washington, D.C., NPR's Steve Inskeep had the chance to interview him in front of a lively crowd.

Read more
Planet Money
2:49 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Where Teenagers Run The Economy

Future central bankers of Ridgefield High
NPR

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 7:10 am

Every spring, high school students descend on the headquarters of the New York Federal Reserve, a few blocks from Wall Street in downtown Manhattan. They compete to see who does the best impression of a central banker.

The High School Fed Challenge is a big deal. Schools like Montclair High in Montclair, New Jersey have multiple rounds of tryouts just to get on the team. Then they practice for months.

Read more
StoryCorps
11:17 pm
Thu May 10, 2012

A Mother And Son, And 'The Good Side Of Things'

Dennis McLaughlin interviewed his mom, Theresa, at StoryCorps in Portland, Maine, to thank her for how she raised him.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 8:11 am

Dennis McLaughlin interviewed his mom, Theresa, to thank her for how she raised him. Born in 1948 with spina bifida, he was missing several vertebrae and was unable to use his legs. Theresa was a single mom, working in a paper mill near Portland, Maine.

"When you were 1 year old, your grandfather McLaughlin built you a little wheelchair," Theresa says, "built it out of wood that he had and wheels from a tricycle, and you got around in that very, very well."

Read more
Morning Edition
9:25 am
Thu May 10, 2012

Fear of the Beetle

New Hampshire foresters are closely watching the movements of an exotic beetle known as the Emerald Ash Borer.  Just last month the U-S Forest Service announced that for the first time, the beetle has been found east of the Hudson river.  That’s just ninety miles from the New Hampshire border.  The Emerald Ash Borer first appeared in North America ten years ago, and has killed millions of ash trees in several mid-Atlantic and Midwestern states, as well as Canada.  To find out whether or not the beetle poses a threat to the Granite State, we turn to Kyle Lombard.  He’s the Forest Health Prog

Business
7:45 am
Thu May 10, 2012

Brad Pitt Is The New Face Of Chanel No. 5 Ads

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Middle East
4:48 am
Thu May 10, 2012

Jihadist Group In Syria Carries Out Violent Attacks

Syrians appear behind the damaged windshield of a minibus as they inspect the site of a blast in the central Midan district of Damascus last month. A new jihadist organization in Syria claimed responsibility for the attack.
Louai Besharalouai Beshara AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 8:17 am

It was Friday, April 27, when a car bomb exploded in the Damascus neighborhood of Midan. Syrian state television showed soldiers and civilians running from the smoke of the explosion under a bridge. Then the camera closed in on streams of blood and body parts.

The Syrian regime's narrative is that the uprising that has gripped the country for more than a year is not a case of people protesting and sometimes fighting for their rights; the official stance is that it's terrorism.

Read more
Business
4:48 am
Thu May 10, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 7:28 am

The Federal Reserve has announced three of China's largest state-owned banks have been given approval to expand their operations in the U.S. Analysts say that ICBC, China investment Corp., and Central Huijin Investment will likely look to purchase regional U.S. banks and establish a footprint in the American market.

Business
4:48 am
Thu May 10, 2012

GOP Governors Debate Health Exchanges

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 7:08 am

States are moving to set up health insurance exchanges — a pillar of Obama's health care law. But many GOP governors find themselves in an awkward position. David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, talks to Steve Inskeep about why the governors' positions on exchanges are complicated.

Business
4:48 am
Thu May 10, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 7:32 am

Hairstyling icon Vidal Sassoon has died at the age of 84. He first earned acclaim for creating hair cuts that needed little styling.

Movies
2:57 am
Thu May 10, 2012

'Dark Shadows': The Birth Of The Modern TV Vampire

In the influential Dark Shadows, a 1960s ABC soap opera with a gothic and supernatural bent, Jonathan Frid played Barnabas Collins, a vampire who returned to claim his coastal Maine manor.
Dan Curtis Productions The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 11:20 am

When it comes to monsters on television, vampires have the market more or less cornered. Think about it: Buffy the Vampire Slayer, True Blood, The Vampire Diaries ...

Vampires' enduring popularity on TV may not be eternal, but they have been appearing on the small screen for decades. Mark Dawidziak, who's written books about vampires and teaches a class at Kent State University on their appearances in film and TV, says that part of the way vampires have remained a force in popular culture is through their evolution on TV.

Read more
National Security
2:56 am
Thu May 10, 2012

Cybersecurity Firms Ditch Defense, Learn To 'Hunt'

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 1:19 pm

The most challenging cyberattacks these days come from China and target Western firms' trade secrets and intellectual property. But a problem for some is a business opportunity for others: It's boom time for cybersecurity firms that specialize in going after Chinese hackers.

"It's the next big thing," says Richard Stiennon, an industry analyst who specializes in information security firms.

'An Adversary Problem'

Read more
Asia
2:55 am
Thu May 10, 2012

After The Quake, Japanese Shop For Survival

Store manager Naoto Higashi models a helmet, a fully stocked kit in his backpack, and a windup flashlight. Such items have become popular in Japan following last year's huge earthquake and tsunami.
Lucy Craft for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 4:48 am

Walk into any large Japanese retailer nowadays, and you might think Japan had become a nation of survivalists.

Aeon, a Wal-Mart-like chain of stores, devotes a sizable chunk of floor space to something called bosai-yohin, or "disaster-protection gear."

Naoto Higashi, a manager at one of the Tokyo stores, demonstrates some of their best-sellers, flashlights that have become the Swiss Army knives of anti-earthquake gear.

Read more

Pages