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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

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Let's go next to India, where the world's largest democracy tomorrow rolls out an overhaul of the tax system, which has a lot of Indians concerned. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

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A hundred years ago this month, American soldiers known as doughboys began arriving in France to fight in World War I. As NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports, all year long, France is going to be remembering Uncle Sam's troops.

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Ten-year-old triplets Maddy, Zoë and Nick Waters share everything from a birthday to a bedroom. But in a StoryCorps booth in Bloomington, Ind., they discover — even as they finish each other's sentences — that there are still some things they needed to learn about each other.

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Good morning, I'm David Greene. This next story - David, I just can't do this.

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Fine. Thanks anyway, Steve.

INSKEEP: I tried.

JAY-Z opens his latest album, 4:44, by slaying his own ego.

For an MC who's spent his entire career constructing such a formidable facade, it's a tall task. But "Kill Jay Z" sets the stage for what becomes his most personal, vulnerable album yet — and arguably one of his best.

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And, Steve, did a presidential tweet just bring unity to Washington, D.C.?

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To health care now - both Democrats and Republicans in the Senate are complaining that they aren't working together. Here's Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaking on the Senate floor yesterday.

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Let's start this story by noting that Cardinal George Pell, top official at the Vatican, is considered innocent until proven guilty.

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People in China have been paying cash for things for thousands of years, long before other civilizations. Now, increasingly, they're paying with their cellphones.

So while the Trump administration hailed a bilateral deal in May, that would allow U.S. credit card firms including Visa and Mastercard access to the China market, it may not be the coup those firms hoped. Chinese consumers are essentially leapfrogging plastic, and going straight from cash to mobile payments.

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The writer who created Paddington Bear has died. Michael Bond was behind the well-mannered-but-accident-prone bear.

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Oh, summertime - laying out on the beach, taking in sun, swimming. And if you're in the Pacific Northwest, that might mean encountering a strange creature called a sea pickle.

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The Senate delay in voting to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act is giving lawmakers extra time to discuss the legislation.

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A hundred years ago this month, President Woodrow Wilson signed the Espionage Act to deal with spying against the U.S. in World War I.

Historically, the most notorious U.S. spy cases have been tried under the act, like the one against Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted in 1951 of giving nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union and executed two years later.

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And let's bring another voice now into the conversation. NPR's White House correspondent Scott Horsley has been covering this debate for years and years and years...

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: (Laughter).

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Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is giving up on trying to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act before July Fourth. But he says he is not giving up.

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The chaos in Venezuela now extends to the skies over the capital. Yesterday a helicopter appeared over Caracas. Someone inside allegedly opened fire on a government building, and people took cell phone video as the pilot dropped what appeared to be hand grenades.

The European Union says Google unfairly abused its power over search results to promote its results over competitors. It's the biggest fine the EU has ever given a single company in an anti-trust case. The company has 90 days to fix the problem or it gets fined more.

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Two-thousand miles away from the Supreme Court's vaulted ceiling and marble friezes, 60-year-old jobless mother Maria Guereca sat in her $20-a-month, one-room apartment with a fan and a hotplate — beside a picture of her dead son.

On Monday, the Court gave Guereca, who lives in Juarez, Mexico, a partial victory, saying a lower court erred in granting immunity to an agent who shot and killed her son.

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