Something Wild

Fridays at 8:45 am and 4:44 pm

Holy cow!

Something Wild has been exploring the wonder
of the landscape that surrounds us in New Hampshire
for 20 years! Help us celebrate this remarkable milestone by sharing your favorite Something Wild memory. Call and leave a message at 603-513-7797 and you might hear your voice on the air. 

From the many birds that call our state home to the trees around New Hampshire that have been granted "Big Trees" status to stone walls that perforate the state, we explain the behavior and science behind what we see and hear and might take for granted in our backyards.

Something Wild is hosted by Dave Anderson and Chris Martin; and produced by Andrew Parrella.

Click here to get our podcast on iTunes.

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH:

Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests
New Hampshire Audubon

Ways to Connect

Stone Walls Make Good Fences

Dec 12, 2009
Lorianne DiSabato via Flickr/Creative Commons

  New England's distinctive stone walls are estimated to stretch 240,000 miles, the distance from Earth to the Moon. Though the layout seems maze-like, there was a method behind the construction. And with winter's reduced foliage, now is an especially good time to take a closer look. 

 

A homesteading family worked the land in four ways, each requiring different precision of sifting of the land.

Something Wild: Red Fox

Oct 14, 2005
Courtesy bzd1 via Flickr/Creative Commons

If you see a fox near your house, it's likely to be a red fox. These cunning creatures are evolving into suburban- and even urban- dwellers. 

So how do you tell a red fox from a grey fox? Well, the red fox has a white tip on its tail, and the grey fox has a black one. But a better clue is where you've spotted one of these handsome canines. If you see it near your house, it's likely to be a red fox. That's because these cunning creatures are evolving into suburban- and even urban - dwellers. 

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