Word of Mouth

Saturdays at 11 am, Tuesdays at 8 pm

Word of Mouth explores the nooks and crannies of New Hampshire. Airs Saturdays at 11 am and replays Tuesdays at 8 pm.

Subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts or find us wherever you get your podcasts!

Send us an email: Word of Mouth

Leave us a message: 603.513.7796

Curious about things you've seen, heard, or experienced in our state? Send us your "Only In New Hampshire" questions here!

Border/State

Jul 13, 2018
Robert Garrova

Conversations around immigration have become a hot-button issues once again, not just in national rhetoric, but here in the Granite State. On today's show we'll hear of one family's vacation that came to a screeching halt on I-93, what an open borders policy could look like, and we'll hear about the sport that transcends borders.  

  •   Plus a conversation with Milford grad and Seattle Reign FC's Morgan Andrews
  • A Father-Daughter bond with deep love of country and soccer 

This week, we're going deep into our country's founding through radio drama, the classic musical "1776," and the inside story of a New Hampshire-based fake news site. 

Since May, a string of viral Facebook posts have led some to ask: what’s the difference between satire, and fake news? Producer Taylor Quimby investigates.  

(Editor's note: we highly recommend listening to this story.)

Why is it so difficult for a woman of color to find a good haircut in New Hampshire?

Courtney Marshall returns to the show with a problem: where can she get her hair done? We investigate the hair scene for people of color in the Granite State. Plus, spoils from the annual Gilsum Rock Swap.

Laurie Shaull, courtsey Flickr CC: https://bit.ly/2lrvtMI

Bloody footprints. A rifle thrown to the floor. Bodies splayed across the bedroom. It's a gruesome scene. Still, you might have to squint to make it all out. Because this murder is in miniature... Today on the show, a profile of Frances Glessner Lee, called "the Mother of Forensic Science," and her famous crime-scene dioramas. Plus, a visit to a Juneteenth Day event in Nashua and the next installment in our NH license plate culture.  It's a Word of Mouth smorgasbord!

Andover Beacon

Two hundred years ago, Richard Potter was one of the nation’s most famous entertainers, but he’s all but vanished from public memory. So has his extravagant house. 

Grassroots

Jun 15, 2018

Over the past five years, New Hampshire's cannabis legislation has gone from non-existent to possible all-out legalization. But among neighboring states, New Hampshire still lags behind. On today's show we're answering an #OnlyinNH question that asks, "why, when compared to other New England states, is New Hampshire so conservative on cannabis legislation?" And then a different kind of high - we head to the mountains to see who's hiking and smoking?   

SquidFlip: Concord's Kid Entrepreneur

Jun 8, 2018
Taylor Quimby

Recently, I visited a summer-season open house at SquidFlip on Warren Street in Concord: A basement business where you can find brightly colored furniture, side-tables made from vintage suitcases, and hand-mixed chalk paints with charming New Hampshire-based names. It's a cute little business, but even more remarkable is the boy who runs it: 11-year old Owen Simoes.

The Splatmasters

Jun 8, 2018
Photo courtesy of Joe Drinon

There's so much happening in this show, it's hard to know where to start. We interview a very together kid entrepreneur. We investigate the semi-secret economy of international workers in New Hampshire. We talk about NH vanity license plates.  And we tell the incredible, mostly true story of how a multibillion dollar sport got its start in the woods of Henniker.  

We love making this show. Help support local journalism by donating here: bit.ly/2LeT8ei.

In 1859, a Mrs. H.E. Wilson published a novel at her own expense. The book told the story of a biracial girl named Frado abandoned by her mother to be raised by a prominent family where she suffered verbal and physical abuse at the hand of her employers in a New Hampshire town famous for its abolitionist activities.

The novel didn’t sell well - likely less than 100 copies - and the book as well as its author fell into obscurity.

Justine Paradis

What if the gym were a joyful place?

We love making this show. Help support local journalism by donating here: bit.ly/2LeT8ei.

New Hampshire loves its vanity plates. We were supposedly the first state to offer them and rank second in the nation (behind Virginia) in the number of vanity plates on the road. There's even a NH License Plate Museum.

Our own parking lot at NHPR is filled with vanity plates. 

Barbara Follett had done more by the age of 25 than many will do in their lifetime. Including vanishing. Today on the show, the disappearance of an American prodigy... and how we forgot her. Plus, the rediscovery of the first known published African American in the country -- a woman from New Hampshire -- and how one woman figured out how to bring LGBTQ pride back to Concord year after year.

Speech Bubble

May 18, 2018
CREDIT FACEBOOK - ALL EYES ON UNH

In this episode, Producer Jimmy Gutierrez heads to the UNH campus to find out more about how debates over free speech are playing out on a majority white campus. Check out his earlier reporting here

Also on the show, NHPR's Annie Ropeik takes to the Crawford Trail to find out what it takes to maintain the region's oldest continuously used hiking path, and the story of how the humble potato came to North America. 

Courtesy Mark Baer

Before Nintendo 64, before Playstation, before Wii or Dreamcast or Xbox... there was the Magnavox Odyssey.

Taylor Quimby

California may be home to some of the video game industry's biggest players, but  Ralph Baer, considered by many to be "the Father of Video Games," developed the first game console in good ol' New Hampshire.  Today on the show, vignettes from the past, present, and future of gaming in the Granite State.

New Hampshire State Flag
Wikimedia Commons

In 2001, North American Vexillological Association conducted a survey of the 72 flags of the United States and Canada.

New Hampshire's state flag came in 63rd place .

Tom Mungovan teaches Graphic Design at the Concord Regional Technical Center at Concord High School.

I visited the school last week to see what his students thought of our state flag. 

Eric Masterson

What exactly is going on with the design of New Hampshire's state flag... and why is it so very unsatisfying? We investigate.
 

Plus, we chase the spring bird migration and examine the legend of the casserole.

Elmire Jolicoeur
FindAGrave

There’s a story out there… a story you’ll find on dozens, maybe hundreds of websites, about the invention of the casserole:

“In 1866, Elmire Jolicoeur, a French Canadian immigrant, invented the precursor of the modern casserole in Berlin, New Hampshire.”

That’s from Wikipedia. If you don’t trust Wikipedia, you can also find this attribution in print, too.

tupperware party
State Library and Archives of Florida

In the early 1940s, an inventor from Berlin, New Hampshire, created a container made of refined polyethylene, an odorless, non-toxic plastic. He called the material “Poly-T.” A few years later, he designed an airtight lid.

While April is National Poetry Month, it's also the time of year when some people whisper among themselves that the form is "really not for me". On this week's show we'll ask a couple of local wordsmiths how to make poetry more accessible.

And, as the ghost of William Shakespeare enjoys renewed interest every April, one local man gets down to brass tacks - was Shakespeare a plagiarist?

NHPR and The Music Hall Present Writers on a New England Stage with Katy Tur. Tur's memoir, Unbelievable, recalls the relentless pace of reporting on the unprecedented Trump presidential campaign for NBC and MSNBC. Tur became a fixation for Trump as he ratcheted up hostility against the media. Tur stood up to Trump's taunting on Twitter and his calling her out at rallies.

Even though I spent the first 21 years of my life in New Hampshire, I  did a lot of growing up much later at NHPR. My experience in community and public radio had been vast and fulfilling by the time I returned to my home state in 2008. I’d produced programs for NPR with sleek professionals in New York and Boston;  trained journalists in the Balkans; and worked with stations in West Africa that deliver programs via cassette on motorbikes. But I had never sat in the host’s chair.

The State of The 'Free State'

Apr 13, 2018
Fyn Kyn, Flickr CC: https://bit.ly/2H0bBO8

An anarchist, a libertarian, and a Bitcoin enthusiast walk into a bar ... no, it's not a joke: it's likely a gathering of members of the Free State Project. So, just what is the FSP, you ask? It's a non-profit, a political experiment, a Libertarian mass migration movement, and a difficult-to-categorize spiderweb of connected subcultures—a group that's been confounding long-time residents and recent transplants to New Hampshire for years. 

This episode is dedicated to answering a single complicated question, sent in from a listener as part of our Only In NH series: What exactly is the Free State Project? 

For the print version of this story, featuring photos and links to more information, click here (or on the link below). 

There are plenty of examples of literary and artistic couples: F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Fitzgerald, George O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera... but some of these partnerships were famously fraught. A relationship that functions on many levels, both creative and romantic, brings the particular challenge of balancing family and art. 

In Lebanon, Keiselim Montás and Kianny Antigua are living that balancing act. They are both published, acclaimed writers... and they're married. How do they balance their family life with their literary practice?

In the mid-19th century, the country was in the throes of a widespread religious revival. It was called the Second Great Awakening, and it fostered the founding of new denominations and inspired millions of converts. This movement laid the groundwork for Methodists and Baptists to exponentially in number, and for Joseph Smith to establish his church of Latter Day Saints.

A lot of people hear "cooperative business" and think of their local food co-ops. But, the co-op model isn't limited to bulk bins of quinoa - it was designed to share profits with workers and give small businesses leverage against megastores.

So, what role do they play in the Granite State? 

Plus, we'll hear from area high school students, in this post-Parkland moment, who are organizing to tell lawmakers: Never Again. 

Taylor Quimby

Which of these subjects is more controversial: New Hampshire liquor laws, regional pizza preferences, or the concept of a broad-based income tax in NH?  

In this episode, we look back at some of our favorite (and most hotly debated) stories from our "Only in New Hampshire" series, where you ask the questions and we find the answers. We'll hear about a requirement that bars selling hard alcohol must also serve food. We'll find out why one style of pizza dominates the Granite State, and we'll explore how New Hampshire became known for eschewing the use of broad-based income taxes to increase revenue. Plus, some updates, listener feedback, and behind-the-scenes editorial debates that helped shape these stories.


As the legend goes, Sevilla Jones and Henry N. Sargent were courting when Sevilla's heart changed, and their romance took a tragic turn.

The pair died over 160 years ago, but the notorious gravestone in New Boston's cemetery still draws curious visitors.

But what really happened?

In the months since #MeToo went viral on social media, millions of people across the globe have broken the silence on their stories of sexual assault and harassment. But where do we stand in New Hampshire? How has the Granite State responded to the Me Too movement? What conversations are we having? What actions are we taking?

Pages