Word of Mouth

Word of Mouth airs at 2 pm Monday through Thursday, weeknights at 9 pm, and noon on Sunday.

Word of Mouth is the sound of new ideas, hosted by Virginia Prescott, and produced by Taylor Quimby, and Logan Shannon. Our Senior Producer is Maureen McMurray

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(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/5843848811/" target="_blank">Gage Skidmore</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

On Sunday, the Manchester Union Leader endorsed former house speaker Newt Gingrich as Republican candidate for President and enlivened the Sunday talk shows. Salon’s news editor Steve Kornacki  compares the surprise of "newtmentum" to another theatrical scheme…Zero Mostel, playing Max Bialystock to Gene Wilder’s timid Leo Bloom in the 1968 Mel Brooks film, The ProducersKornacki says tha

(Photo courtesy <a href="www.mattpolly.com" target="_blank">Matt Polly</a>)

Who doesn’t love an underdog? A Rocky in the ring? With the audience for boxing eroding, the new ring is an octagonal cage. In popularity and profits, mixed martial arts, or MMA, has knocked out boxing in the past decade.  The Ultimate Fighting Championship, MMA’s flagship event, was sold for two million dollars in 2001. Today, it’s worth an estimated one billion. Our guest today is a definitive UFC underdog.  He’s a writer who dove George Plimpton-style into the grueling world of MMA and landed in the octagon. 

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/greg2point0/2623514400/" target="_blank">Greg Gillinger</a> via Flickr)

When Word of Mouth sent me to cover a competition designed around Legos, I had no idea that I was walking into the Superbowl of problem solving. 

LINKS:

First Lego League Web Site

Watch the Yappin' Yodas in action

Author Stephen King has written more than 50 worldwide best-sellers. More than 80 feature and television film adaptations have extended King’s reach far beyond the bestsellers list, earning him the title of “Master of Horror,” and establishing him as one of the most influential writers of our age.

Today on  Word of Mouth, a healthcare model that offers rides, cuts toenails, and does generally whatever it takes to keep the elderly healthy.  Plus, the less-quoted constitutional clauses and oddities that inform and amuse our American way of life.  Also, from homies to hermanos: an unlikely way out for Central American gang members weary of the streets.  And former war correspondent PJ O'Rourke describes life in the trenches of family vacations.

11/26/11 PART 4

Nov 26, 2011
Photo by Jess J, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Former war journalist turned humorist P.J. O'Rourke talks about travel writing, and living in the family war zone. His latest book is Holidays in Heck.

11/26/11 PART 3

Nov 26, 2011
Photo by Piet den Blanken, courtesy of Oxford University Press

Why would a gun-wielding, tattoo-bearing "homie" trade in la vida loca for a Bible and the buttoned-down lifestyle of an evangelical hermano (brother in Christ)? To answer this question, Robert Brenneman interviewed sixty-three former gang members from the "Northern Triangle" of Central America--Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras--most of whom left their gang for evangelicalism.

11/26/11 PART 2

Nov 26, 2011
Photo by Marsmet523, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Jay Wexler's new book and blog focus on the odd Constitutional clauses we should, maybe, focus on a little less... and those we should, perhaps, turn into awesome t-shirts.

11/26/11 PART 1

Nov 26, 2011
Photo by Chickenlump, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Author and journalist Adrian Slywotzky discusses whether Caremore, a patient-based healthcare model based on little details, can still save money after going big.  Plus, Jessica Golloher investigates a Russian preference for alternative-alternative medicine over visits to the doctor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Casual carnivores imagining a vegan Thanksgiving might picture something like this: a  grayish “mock” turkey, dry spongy stuffing, and  cookies that taste like sawdust.  Vegan cooking has made great strides in recent years, but it still feels like a bit of a buzzkill to insist upon being vegan at Thanksgiving.

(Photo by Matthew Mead)

Celebrity designer Matthew Mead shares his tricks for making entertaining easy, beautiful, and fun...even if you don't have time to make a walnut wreath.

Former war journalist turned humorist P.J. O'Rourke talks about travel writing, and living in the family war  zone. His latest book is Holidays in Heck.

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rednut/498482766/sizes/m/in/photostream/" target="_blank">Ginger Me</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

Super designer and celebrity lifestyle expert Matthew Mead shares his ideas for Holiday entertaining. A vegan cookbook does its best to make Turkey Day yummy. P.J. O'Rourke shares tales from the lighter side of reporting. And why we should do a little better with that whole "listening" thing.

Photo by Piet den Blanken, courtesy of Oxford University Press

Why would a gun-wielding, tattoo-bearing "homie" trade in la vida loca for a Bible and the buttoned-down lifestyle of an evangelical hermano (brother in Christ)? To answer this question, Robert Brenneman interviewed sixty-three former gang members from the "Northern Triangle" of Central America--Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras--most of whom left their gang for evangelicalism.

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/roemerman/444304025/">Steven Roerman </a>via Flickr Creative Commons)

Jay Wexler's new book and blog focus on the odd Constitutional clauses we should, maybe, focus on a little less...and those we should, perhaps, turn into awesome t-shirts.

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/sunnyuk/3240916291/>Sunny UK </a>via Flickr Creative Commons)

Jessica Golloher, Word of Mouth's eyes and ears in Moscow, reports on the scads of Russians signing up for alternative medicine. 

(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/5843848811/">Gage Skidmore </a>via Flickr Creative Commons)

No politician will ever lose votes by coming down on the side of community banks. Unlike the mega-banks of Wall Street that helped fuel the world’s dive off an economic cliff, community banks have a better reputation. They avoid exotic financial deals and, for the most part, stick to their knitting.

(Photo by <a href'="http://www.flickr.com/photos/tswartz/402696142/">Tony Swartz </a>via Flickr Creative Commons)

Politifact catches Newt in a whopper of untruthiness. Why Russians are turning to alternative medicine in droves. The Constitution's weirder clauses. And the stories of gang members turned Evangelicals.

Photo courtesy of the Hood at Dartmouth

Reverse migration: African American populations boomerang back below the Mason-Dixon line.  Plus, why adding "sandwich board" to your resume could be a good thing.  Also, an NGO spreading sustainability in Niger turns 10.  And a look at a Native American Art exhibition from the Hood at Dartmouth.  Finally, data through light - the future of electronic transfer?

Photo by Eschipul, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Analysis of 2011 U.S. census data continues to reveal surprising demographic shifts…including a largely unreported exodus of middle class African Americans to cities in the south. Today, 57% percent of black Americans live below the Mason-Dixon line, the highest percentage since 1960. At the same time, black populations in traditionally integrated cities including New York, Chicago, and Detroit have dropped for the first time in American history.

Photo by Emilia Jjenstram, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

This weekend, Moammar Ghadaffi’s son Saif was captured while trying to flee south into Niger, which offered asylum to his brother Saadi a few weeks ago. The last time the western world heard much about the North African nation was during the buildup to the Iraq war when British and U.S. intelligence claimed that Niger was the source of yellowcake uranium for Sadaam Hussein’s weapons program. Today, Niger remains one of the poorest countries in the world.

For Native Americans, Thanksgiving is not a cause for celebration.  The holiday commemorating the survival – thanks to the Wampanoag tribe – of early settlers also marks the first wave of a European invasion that culminated in the death of 10 to 30 million native people.

Throughout the year, we’ve been featuring a series we call 11 for 11… conversations with innovative thinkers who challenge and provoke new ways of thinking about the issues of our time. Dr. Raymond Tallis is a former clinical neuroscientist turned author.

Richard Conniff talks about his new book, The Species Seekers. And NHPR's Sam Evans Brown takes a trip to Vermont to find out what permaculture is.

Word of Mouth’s internet sherpa Brady Carlson is back. After his weekday shifts hosting All Things Considered, Brady likes to unwind by gathering new items for Here's What’s Awesome, our frequent look at the web and its endless list of memes, trends and viral hits.

A secret online black market exposed. And a Connecticut High School's controversial, Columbine-style ruse to clear the hallways for a drug sweep.  

(<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/3501111280/">Leo Reynolds </a>via Flickr)

Part 1:

We take a journey to an online black market where you can buy anything from M-16's to fake identities. A Connecticut high school's Columbine-style ruse to clear the halls for a drug sweep.

Part 2:

Brady Carlson returns with Here's What's Awesome.

Part 3:

Richard Conniff on The Species Seekers. What the heck is permaculture?

Part 4:

(<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/instantvantage/6108039196/" target="_blank">Instant Vantage</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

You may recall that as President, Ronald Reagan labeled ketchup as a vegetable. On Monday, a joint House-Senate spending bill added tomato paste slathered on pizza to the vegetable group. In fact, pizza is now designated as a “supervegetable”. Julian Pecquet covers health care for The Hill and has been following the bill, and the lobbying effort behind it.

We can't help but wonder what Michelle said when she found out.

 

 

(<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/linusekenstam/4051974981/sizes/l/in/photostream/" target="_blank">Jan Ekenstam</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

Former Word of Mouth intern Stephanie Reighart visited an unexpected restaurant catering to the Upper Valley called Tastes of Africa.

(<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/sheepies/3539476944/sizes/m/in/photostream/" target="_blank">Andreas Photography</a> via Flickr Creative Commons)

Before vaccines became standard care, parents who wanted to build their children’s immunity to common diseases often brought them to play with other neighborhood kids already infected with bugs like the measles and chicken pox. Now, a small group of parents opposed to vaccines are reviving “pox parties” via social media sites like Facebook. Recently, one mother catered to that  crowd by advertising homemade lollipops tainted with the varicella virus…yep.

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