AHCA

The GOP's latest proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act hews closely to the earlier bill that didn't win enough support among lawmakers to bring to a vote.

Perhaps the biggest change in the document released Thursday is that it leaves in place the Affordable Care Act taxes on wealthy individuals. It uses that money to reduce the number of people left without insurance coverage by the law's changes. This latest version adds $70 billion to a fund for states — bringing the total to $132 billion — to help support coverage of low-income people.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 30th, 2017

Jun 30, 2017

Governor Sununu and other New Hampshire lawmakers announced their opposition to the proposed healthcare bill from the U.S. Senate.  "Keno-garten" comes to the Granite State, but critics worry the new funding from the electronic gambling game Keno won't be enough for widespread full-day kindergarten programs. And Mayor Ted Gatsas of Manchester announces his re-election campaign, amongst some controversy. 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Governor Sununu says his staff is reviewing the US Senate’s version of the health care reform bill, made public Thursday.

As the Senate released the bill, Sununu published a letter to Congressional leadership along with New Hampshire Senate Majority Leader Chuck Morse and House Speaker Shawn Jasper.  

Despite uncertainty over the Affordable Care Act and the GOP’s plan to replace it, four insurers have filed initial applications to sell policies next year in New Hampshire’s marketplace.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: May 12, 2017

May 12, 2017

President Trump names N.H. Secretary of State Bill Gardner to a Presidential Commission on Election Integrity. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price visits New Hampshire to hear about the state’s response to the opioid crisis.  And legislative hearings into online postings by two state reps become contentious.  


After weeks of will-they-or-won't-they tensions, the House managed to pass its GOP replacement for the Affordable Care Act on Thursday by a razor-thin margin. The vote was 217-213.

Democrats who lost the battle are still convinced they may win the political war. As the Republicans reached a majority for the bill, Democrats on the House floor began chanting, "Na, na, na, na ... hey, hey, hey ... goodbye." They say Republicans could lose their seats for supporting a bill that could cause so much disruption in voters' health care.