alcohol

Andreas Levers / Flickr/cc

Roughly seventeen million Americans suffer from alcoholism, making it the country’s most prevalent addiction. We’ll look at efforts in New Hampshire to address this. Plus, we’ll hear from critics and supporters of the most commonly prescribed approach to treating the disease, Alcoholics Anonymous.

Miguel O. Strauss via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/89BTbC

Bankrupt orchestras, aging audiences, skyrocketing tuition at conservatories; the death knell for classical music in America is sounding again. On today’s show, a concert cellist offers some tough love for the classical music world.

Then we’ll investigate the condiment that brought down an empire. Among the disturbing parallels between America and the fall of Rome: over reliance on one condiment!

Plus: we’ll sample some of history’s craziest hangover cures. From fried canary to raw eel.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

The Economic Impact Of Substance Abuse In N.H.

Dec 17, 2014
Joe Shlabotnik / Flickr/CC

On top of individual suffering, a recent report finds alcohol and drugs also take a toll on workforce productivity and the state’s fiscal well-being -- to the tune of nearly two billion dollars.  The authors say policy makers and business leaders should consider addressing this as way to help bolster the state’s economy.

GUESTS:

Petra / Flickr/CC

It’s often said that adolescents are impulsive partly because their brains aren’t fully developed.  Now a new book adds fuel to the discussion, describing how the period of adolescence is a lot longer these days, from age ten to twenty-five. It also shows that the brain at this time is highly malleable, and much more easily influenced by both positive and negative experiences. 

This program was originally broadcast on November 3, 2014.

Sean Hurley

Norman Collins was famous for tattooing sailors. He hopped trains as a kid, joined the Navy, and set up an ink shop in Honolulu where he earned the nickname "Sailor Jerry".  When he died in 1973, he had no idea that one day there'd be a spiced rum with his name on it.

"Here's to life outside the lines. Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum."

In 1999, Steve Grasse helped turn Sailor Jerry the man into Sailor Jerry the brand.

"Sailor Jerry is a huge hit."

ep_jhu

Drug and alcohol abuse put a $1.84 billion strain on the New Hampshire economy in 2012, according to a new study. That figure was almost three percent of the state’s GDP in that same year.

Sara Plourde

The centers for disease control and prevention recently reported that doctors don’t adequately warn patients about the dangers of drinking. CDC director Dr. Thomas Frieden said, “there are at least 38 million Americans who have problems with alcohol. For every alcoholic, there are six people who drink too much to the point where it adversely affects their lives”. Our guest is Lance Brendan Young, he argues the problem doesn’t begin in the doctor’s office, but dates back to 1849 when the term “alcoholism” was first described as a chronic, relapsing disease. Lance is assistant professor of communication at Western Illinois University and has researched and written extensively on the language used to frame alcohol abuse. He doesn’t think the condition should be treated as a disease 

via npr.org

The idea of writing a book about writers who drank too much sounds a little like shooting fish in a barrel. The relationship between addiction and creativity remains somewhat mythic…and frequently mimicked. Remarkably talented writers and champion boozers like John Cheever, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Tennessee Williams drank through successes and failures and kept going even as their creativity crumbled and their lives circled the drain. 

Olivia Laing traveled across the U.S. to follow the paths of six famous literary alcoholics, two of whom ended up suicides, the others dead by middle age. Her new book is called “The Trip to Echo Spring”.

Beer Goggles
Adam Fagen / Flickr Creative Commons

Starting with the New Year on Wednesday, cities and towns will have the option of extending last call at bars from 1 a.m. to 2 a.m.

Tower
Kate Blithdale / Flickr Creative Commons

The new president of Dartmouth College says progress is being made on two pressing campus safety issues: high-risk drinking and sexual assault.   Philip Hanlon, who was inaugurated in September, told faculty members this week that the number of students treated for extreme intoxication --blood alcohol content above .25 percent--dropped from 80 in 2011 to 31 last year. Just five were treated this fall, compared to 29 in the fall of 2010.