All Things Considered

In recent years America has marked 50 years since a number of key moments in the civil rights movement. The March on Washington. The murder of Medgar Evers. The Bloody Sunday at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma.

This year marks a half century since a killing that hits closer to home.

Jonathan Daniels, a native of Keene, New Hampshire, was killed in the summer of 1965. And Keene State College is holding a series of events this year about Daniels’ life and legacy.

This story is part of our series “Rising Tide” about how – or whether - Rhode Islanders are emerging from the deepest economic recession since the 1930s. The question we’re asking is: does a rising tide really lift all boats, or are some Rhode Islanders still being left behind?

The decision by Gov. Peter Shumlin to abandon a single payer health care system is having an unexpected impact on Vermont's larger businesses. And lawmakers will now have to make decisions that Vermont's health care law never anticipated.

Natalia Curtiss via Flickr/CC -

It was 1623 when European settlers established their first fishing colony in the area around the Piscataqua River.  That was nearly 400 years ago – and yet the period between then and now is just a small part of the human history of the area we now call New Hampshire.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Life on New Hampshire’s Isles of Shoals isn’t always the same as it is for those of us on the mainland. But a solar energy project there may point the way toward the future of energy all over the region.

K Hardy via Flickr/CC -

There's a spring tradition that's been building over the last few years: Peeps diorama contests. Participants use those marshmallow birds and bunnies to put together all kinds of wacky and creative displays.

Werner via Flickr/CC -

It’s time to talk about cats.

Yes, it’s hard to believe that in the internet era, where Grumpy Cat and Keyboard Cat have become celebrities, and seemingly every third item we see on Facebook is a cat video, that we’d need to spend more time on felines.

NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

A Dartmouth astrophysicist is part of a team that’s been looking billions of years into the universe’s past – and they’ve found some clues that may explain why galaxies form the way they do.

Ryan Hickox is an assistant professor of physics and astronomy. The findings of his team were published in the journal Nature. Ryan Hickox joined All Things Considered with more on the findings.


Rob_ / Flickr CC

Recently Eversource Energy, formerly known as PSNH, announced it would sell off its power plants. That would make New Hampshire’s electricity suppliers separate from its electricity producers - at least for a while. A new bill in front of the State House would make it easier for electric utilities to own what are called “distributed energy resources,” which refers primarily to solar power.

Ben Hudson via Society for Protection of NH Forests

Last week, 12 deer were found dead in South Hampton. On Tuesday New Hampshire Fish and Game announced the cause of those deaths: feeding by humans.

Dan Bergeron is a deer project leader with New Hampshire Fish and Game. He joined All Things Considered with more on what happened.

 What were these deer fed, and why was that bad for them?

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Kentucky US Senator Rand Paul is in New Hampshire again. He's one of a number of Republicans considering a presidential bid for 2016.

He spoke with All Things Considered following an event in Manchester.


Stanley Zimny via Flickr/CC -

The idea of building a road is pretty straightforward – you build a path and let vehicles go on the path.

The reality is, of course, is way more complicated. How many lanes does the road need, and in which directions? Which signs are necessary – and which are distracting? Does the road make it too hard for vehicles to get through – or can it actually be too easy?

Bill Abbott via Flickr CC

Big changes in the economy are often followed by social changes. One such change is in how married couples manage the work of caring for their children.

Kristin Smith is a family demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. She joined All Things Considered to talk about her recently published research on the number of married fathers providing child care.

Don O'Brien via Flickr/CC -

For people, winter has pros and cons - but for cars, this kind of weather is not ideal.

David Brooks writes the weekly Granite Geek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and He spoke with All Things Considered about the effects of road salt on cars in winter - and the simple and not-so-simple ways we might stop those effects before they start.


Alexey Kljatov via Flickr/CC -

After spending weeks and weeks surrounded by snow piles that are several feet high, it’s easy to forget that those huge piles are made of tiny snowflakes. And no two snowflakes are alike – or at least that’s what we’ve all heard.

courtesy Black Agnes

The debut album by Seacoast-based Black Agnes is called "Mason Jar of Home." Each song explores a different perspective of what home means - where you're born, where your ancestors lived, or even a moment in time.

Frontman Mike Dunbar joined All Things Considered to talk about the band, the concepts at work on the album, and the questions they might explore in a follow-up project.

courtesy Investing In Communities Initiative

There’s lots of discussion these days among public policy leaders and government officials about poverty – what causes it, and what can be done about it.

A new study aims to answer a different question – what are our perceptions of poverty, and what do those tell us about how to deal with the issue? Melissa Bernardin is director of the new Investing in Communities Initiative, which commissioned the research. She joined All Things Considered with more on the research.

Sean Hurley, NHPR

Each year the New Hampshire Maple Producers Association honors the state’s best maple producer with the Lawrence A. Carlisle Memorial Trophy.

This year’s winner is the Fadden family, which has been making syrup for some 200 years, and has been producing on its current location in North Woodstock since the 1930’s.

Jim Fadden joined All Things Considered to talk about the award and the sweet old world of maple.

northeast naturalist via Flickr Creative Commons

How's this for a typical day at the office: get into a helicopter, fly just above treetops in parts of northern New Hampshire, and find moose to tag, track and monitor. It's part of the work New Hampshire Fish and Game is doing to study the effect of winter tick and other parasites on the state's moose population.

Mark Turnauckas via Flickr/CC -

The Super Bowl is still some time away, but there's plenty of competition taking place in New Hampshire - most notably the Rock, Paper, Scissors tournament at the Derryfield School on Sunday, January 25th.

To get a preview, All Things Considered talked with Ben Dougherty, Head of Upper School at Derryfield, and Jack Miron, a Derryfield sophomore who's organizing the tournament.

Michael Rosenstein via Flickr/CC

If seaweed isn't part of your share of New Hampshire food, it may soon be. At least that's the goal of the “exploration of seaweed” event taking place at Stages at One Washington in Dover.

Craik Sustainable Living Project via Flickr/CC -

This is a time of year when heating bills usually go up, and some residents consider alternative energy sources for their heating.

Proponents of geothermal heat say their systems ought to be a bigger part of New Hampshire's energy landscape.

The prospects for geothermal - that's the topic of this month's Science Café discussion, which takes place Wednesday, January 21st, at Killarney's Pub in Nashua.

Ted Murphy via Flickr/CC -

In cold weather we turn to comfort food, and there are few foods more comforting than mac and cheese.

This winter favorite is becoming increasingly versatile, as is evident from the many entries in the New Hampshire’s Own Macaroni and Cheese Bake Off, which takes place Saturday, January 17th, in Concord.

e_monk via Flickr/CC

Medical professionals have a hard time getting people to come in and get screened for various cancers and diseases.

What can be even harder, though, is finding the right screening test.

A large-scale, nearly decade-long study of two screening methods for colorectal cancer is underway. It’s  known by the acronym CONFIRM.

Gina Raimondo’s long path to the top job in Rhode Island politics culminated when she was sworn in Tuesday as the state’s first female governor. Raimondo has cautioned that making change won’t be easy in a state plagued by persistently high unemployment.

Raimondo’s inaugural on the south portico of the Statehouse was steeped in tradition, from the singing of the National Anthem to the firing of a 19-gun salute.


Longtime Washington County Sen. Bill Doyle says he'll propose a constitutional amendment to make it less likely that lawmakers will be asked to elect a governor in the future. Doyle says the results of this year's election show why his amendment is needed.  

Momotarou2012 via WikiCommons/CC -

New Hampshire has plenty of state symbols. The state rock is – no surprise - granite; the state fish is the brook trout. Our state tree is the white birch; our state insect, the ladybug; our state gem, smoky quartz, and so on.

Unlike many other states, New Hampshire does not have a state fossil – at least not yet.

Katie McColgan via Flickr/CC -

These days many stoplights will start changing to green when the intersection detects a car or truck. But some of these intersections don't detect motorcycles, at least not regularly. And a bill before New Hampshire's legislature would let those otherwise stuck bikers ride on through red lights.

Brady Carlson, NHPR

We all have our holiday traditions – family dinners, decorating, songs, presents... or, in one particular case, doing calculations about some of the most famous parts of the holidays.

In just over a week Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant is set to close. It means the end of a long-running debate over the plant and nuclear energy in the Green Mountain State, but it could also mean the start of some economic challenges for the area surrounding the plant, including parts of New Hampshire's Monadnock Region.