Archaeology

Robert Garrova for NHPR

Archaeologists with the New Hampshire Department of Historical Resources say recent discoveries at Livermore Falls may reveal the site has human history stretching back to before its industrial days.

 

"The Hollow" at Livermore Falls is known for its link to a 19th Century mill. But during fieldwork last summer, New Hampshire archeologist David Trubey says researchers found evidence of toolmaking and a possible fish-drying operation.  

 

NH.gov

 

A 19th-century mill community with possible Native American ties will be this year's site for the archaeology field school's summer program, run by New Hampshire's Division of Historical Resources.

The Livermore Falls or "the Hollow" was once the site of pulp mills, a tannery and a fish hatchery. It also included homes, a boarding house, stores and a schoolhouse. Recently, there is evidence to suggest that Native Americans may have once occupied the location.

David Trubey, a New Hampshire archaeologist, will direct fieldwork and instruction.

Via the NH Division of Historical Resources

As part of our continuing series Only in New Hampshire, we're answering questions posed by Granite Staters about their communities. Producer Molly Donahue tackled this one:

"Is it true the NH Division of Historic Resources has a secret list of archaeological site locations to protect them from looting and development?"

The short answer? Yes. (Sort of.)