Art

laudachooos via Flickr Creative Commons

You’ve heard of whiffle-ball… how about whiffle-hurling?  Class-conscious kickball?  Imaginary soccer?  These absurd-sounding games are among the growing number of highly conceptualized art-sports invented by artists and shown on YouTube, and other online video sites. Brooklyn-based artist Tom Russotti is founder of the Institute for Aesthletics… yes, that’s athletics and aesthetics rolled into one. The institute combines sports, participatory art and conceptual social activities. Tom’s games have been invented, played, performed, and experimented with at museums, schools, and arts organizations all over the world.

On this Fourth of July we take a look at a New Hampshire connection to the Declaration of Independence.

For filmmakers there’s the Oscars, for children’s authors there’s the Newbury Award, and in the world of comics and comic art, there’s the Eisner Awards, named after legendary artist and author Will Eisner.

This year one of the Eisner nominees for Best Publication for Early Readers up to age 7 is  Sara Richard, who lives and works here in New Hampshire. She’s nominated for her book “Kitty and Dino.”

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

In this special edition of Word of Mouth: are we catching up with technology? This week we'll explore the very human way we interact with technology; resistance is futile.

I Saw The Sign: The Old-Fashioned Art Of Sign-Painting

Apr 10, 2013
Photo By Stephanie Booth, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Hand-painted signs once dotted the landscape. They brought color, style, and distinction to stores and products, and were the nation’s first form of advertising…and today, with computer graphics and large-scale printing available for cheap, they are pretty much going the way of the horse and buggy… But a number of hand-painting holdouts are sticking with brushes – and are the subject of Sign Painters, a new documentary film about the craft directed by Sam Macon and Faythe Levine.  

Arts On Trial

Apr 9, 2013
afsart via flickr Creative Commons

Throughout history, pieces of art – and their creators, have been hauled into the courtroom. They stood accused of obscenity, extramarital dalliances, societal intermingling, and blasphemy – among other equally verbose charges. Government agencies championed their prosecution as a righteous public service – but maybe they just needed to gain a little sense of humor. Regardless, these pieces of art fought the law. Here to discuss whether the law won is Clay Wirestone, arts editor for the Concord Monitor and author of an article in an upcoming issue of Mental Floss called, “Arts on trial.”

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The New Hampshire Furniture Masters are featuring the work of three female furniture makers through April 9, in Concord.  This story features one of the artists, at her workshop in Manchester.  

via pbs.org

Ai Weiwei is China’s best known artist and the sharpest thorn in the side of its government. He’s a humorous and clever digital dissident, whose installations, viral videos, and tweets mock Chinese censors, and have made him an international symbol for freedom.      

After years of attempting to cozy up to him with bribes and favors, the Chinese government turned on Ai Weiwei, charging him with tax evasion and bulldozing his freshly built studio in Shanghai. Then, on April 3, 2011, he disappeared.

Sean Hurley for NHPR

The Museum of the White Mountains had its Grand Opening this past weekend in Plymouth. Correspondent Sean Hurley spoke with Director Catherine Amidon and sends us this story.

Listening For The Elusive Sound Of Ice Chimes

Feb 22, 2013
Ice Chimes
Amanda Loder / NHPR

This year, the Dartmouth College campus has become temporary home for a mixed-media menagerie called Ice Chimes.  And the 20-foot tall pagoda-like structure outside the Life Sciences building gets a lot of curious stares from students.

Ice Chimes is supposed to be interactive.  But it isn’t exactly intuitive.

via The Atlantic

Our conversation with Sunni Brown sparked an interest in history's doodles; here are some great minds that weren't afraid to scribble a shape or two on their stationary.

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth's weekly program. This week's show features an art blog that uses Google Earth images to show the battlefields of drones, a radio show produced in an an insane asylum, Ty Burr's "Gods Like Us," and history's badass-iest nuns. Plus, webcast funerals!

Part 1:

Keliy Anderson-Staley

Photographer Keliy Anderson-Staley works with tintype photography, a medium that came out ten years after the daguerreotype. Just like the photographers of the 1850’s, she uses similar chemical recipes, period brass lenses, and wooden view cameras. 

John F. Smith

From apps for avoiding heavy traffic to the latest polling data in the presidential race  -- infographics are visual shorthand for data in the post-newspaper slash social media slash sound byte age.  Several sources credit the digital age for giving birth to infographics and others cite the publication of USA Today’s “Snapshots” beginning in 1982.  Susan Schulten begs to differ.

The annual League of New Hampshire Crafts Fair at Mt. Sunapee  is now in its 79th year.

The show opened this past Saturday, and is the oldest, longest-running crafts fair in the country.

About 200 exhibitors are showcasing their wares.  

And most of them spent close to a year leading up to what they call, not just a fair, but the Fair.

Artists are nailing down floors, draping curtains and hanging up lights to get their booths ready for the annual New Hampshire Crafts Fair.

Inspired Lives: David Carroll

Aug 1, 2012
David Carroll, courtesy of the artist

Naturalist-artist David M. Carroll is the author of three acclaimed natural histories.  Swampwalker's Journal, for which he received the John Burroughs medal for distinguished nature writing, The Year of the Turtle, and Trout Reflections. David graduated from the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University, and received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of New Hampshire and an Honorary Masters in Environmental Science from New England College. In 2006 he was named a MacArthur Foundation Fellow.

The Dø

Jul 26, 2012
Photo Credit XiWeg, Via Flickr Creative Commons

Olivia Merilahti and Dan Levy met in 2005 working on a soundtrack for the French film, Empire of the Wolves – the songs they wrote afterwards would eventually be released under the name “The Dø.” The online release of their first four songs had built “The Dø” an instant fan base – and with almost no experience playing live shows as a band, Dan and Olivia suddenly found themselves in front of packed audiences at a series of sold-out Parisian concerts.  Two full-length albums and hundreds of performances later, Word of Mouth producer Taylor Quimby

Inspired Lives: Artist Wolf Kahn

Jul 25, 2012
Courtesy of the artist.

Wolf Kahn was born in Stuttgart, Germany  in 1927 and came to the United States when he was 12-years-old. He later served in the Navy during WWII, and in 1946, under the GI Bill, Kahn attended the Hans Hofmann School, studying under and becoming a studio assistant for Hans Hofmann. Later, Kahn graduated from the University of Chicago. His work in oil paint and pastel mediums share his signature vibrant style. He spends his time in both New York City and West Brattleboro, Vermont. Kahn's wife Emily Mason is also an artist.

TRANSCRIPT

Inspired Lives: Eric Aho

Jul 11, 2012

Eric Aho grew up in Hudson, New Hampshire and now lives just across the border in Saxtons River, Vermont. In the tradition of English painters like John Constable and the French Impressionists, Aho began sketching and painting out of doors using New England’s mountain vistas and rural valleys as his subjects. His early paintings capture dramatic effects of weather and sunlight in a muted pallet, while his more recent paintings are monumental in scale and employ bold colors.

MeineKnipserei / Flickr

Produced with Emma Ruddock

Here’s the set-up…a doomed group of teens isolated on location X -- a campsite, fairground..dorm. A psychopathic killer, often disfigured, stalks them…brandishing sharp weapon X…many are killed in graphic, gory ways until only final girl X survives…cheered on by the adrenaline-surged audience...

Photo by Andrea Metz, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Now that The Hunger Games has killed off the competition for spring box office, Hollywood is gearing up for summer. We’ll get the Batman finale, a Spiderman re-boot, new animated heroes from Pixar and Disney, and comedies from Will Ferrell, and Adam Sandler.  Garen Daly is film consultant for Zeotrope Media is here to preview of some films that won’t break box office records.

Courtesy Hood Museum of Art

The newest acquisition at the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth is from the unconventional French artist Marcel Duchamp. It’s a Box in a Valise, part of a series of works where Duchamp reproduced past creations in miniature form and packed them into a box as a sort of portable museum.

It’s been said that poetry is all that is worth remembering in life. We asked folks to tell us about their memories of how a poem had affected their life. Rodger Martin from Harrisville, New Hampshire remembered hearing a poem that helped him return to civilian life after a tour of duty in Vietnam.

RODGER: The state of the country was in a far different place in 1970.

(Photo by Artotem via Flickr Creative Commons)

Running parallel to the history of art is a long line of art forgeries. Exposed fakes have resulted in scandal, embarrassment, financial ruin, and now, a one-man show. The exhibit, called “Faux Real” …faux as in fake…opened on April first…another wink wink nudge nudge there…to showcase  counterfeit works by the prolific forger Mark Landis. Matt Leininger was the first to spot a Landis forgery. He is co-curator of the show.

Video on the exhibit:

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