Arts

Courtesy of Opera North

Blow-Me-Down Farm occupies more than 40 acres along the Connecticut River, just across the road from Saint Gaudens National Historic Site. The National Park Service owns the property, and has been working with Lebanon-based Opera North on a plan to spruce up the estate and make it a center for the arts.  

theaterofwar.com

The Redfern Arts Center at Keene State College is planning a series of performances that use theater to get at issues around drug and alcohol addiction. Redfern has received $25,000 from the National Endowment for the Arts, which will be used - in part - toward the effort.

A new study, from the non-profit Americans for the Arts, shows arts and culture audiences spent almost $70 million in the four regions of the state that participated in the nationwide study.

That kind of spending makes an impact.

Britta Greene/NHPR

The scene is a fenced-in enclosure, tucked away in the hills in southeastern Vermont. Inside, choreographer Ann Carlson leads a rehearsal with four dancers, a flock of sheep and a border collie.

The dancers drape sheep pelts over their heads, then wave the pelts in front of their bodies like bullfighters — but instead of red cloth, it’s pieces of the animals’ own skin that they’re waving. 

The sheep, it seems, couldn’t care less, until the border collie comes running up. Then, they stop munching the grass, look forward, and run, too. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Expect strange, ethereal sounds to bounce around Dartmouth’s campus on Thursday.

To help celebrate the 150th birthday of the Thayer School of Engineering, composer Molly Herron will debut a new piece of music played on student-designed instruments. Herron, 34, has spent the past several months working with students on their creations: from large chimes to string-lined buckets to a heightened take on the musical saw.

C. Hanchey via Flickr CC.

There’s a legal battle brewing in the city of Nashua over $1 million in arts funding.

A nonprofit Nashua Center for the Arts filed a petition in court this month to dissolve the organization. It wants to send the money left in its trust to the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, but officials in Nashua are trying to stop that from happening to keep the money in the city.

Pien Huang

Dr. Alan Chong took over as the Director and CEO of the Currier Museum of Art last September. His job includes budgets, publicity, and fundraising. But what he’s really excited about is the art.

emerysteele via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/aZVRG2

The ad agency for Royal Caribbean chose a lively, catchy tune for a series of commercials for the cruise line, but it didn’t exactly match the wholesome, fun loving image they were trying to promote. On today’s show we’ll explore how the power of sound can make or break an experience.

Then, we’ll speak with the Israeli musician known as Kutiman, about crafting an album made entirely of unrelated sound samples from YouTube videos.

New Hampshire Magazine/Matthew Lomanno

The New Hampshire theater community is mourning the loss of one of its pillars.

Beth Ann O’Hara passed away Wednesday morning. She was 73.

O’Hara founded the New Thalian Players, with whom she produced and directed 50 plays over 25 years.

She was known simply as “mom” to countless aspiring Granite State actors.

A service will be held Friday in Manchester.

O’Hara was the mother of four daughters, including actress and comedian Sarah Silverman.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

An iconic part of Laconia’s downtown will soon be reborn.

In a deal announced this week, the Belknap Economic Development Council will purchase the historic Colonial Theatre for $1.4 million.

The city will loan the group the money to buy the theater, and assist in raising the $15 million needed for renovations.

The Colonial opened in 1914, but has been shut down since 2001.

Justin Slattery, executive director of the Belknap Economic Development Council, joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about plans for the theater.

Seacoast Charter School

An Arts and Music Charter School on the Seacoast that had faced closure is now likely to stay open.

The Seacoast Charter School has been trying to raise money to stay open since it learned its current lease from Sanborn Regional School District in Kingston wouldn’t be renewed.  The school needed to raise $125,000 by the end of May to lease a new space in Stratham. 

Seacoast Charter School Principal Peter Durso says the school met that goal through the efforts of teachers, parents, and some deep pocketed youngsters.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

  Jane Chu, the nation’s top arts leader, was in New Hampshire this week.

Chu is chair of the National Endowment for the Arts. Her visit to the Granite State comes as the organization celebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

NHPR Morning Edition producer Michael Brindley caught up with Chu during her visit to the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester.

As you’re going around talking to people, what are you learning about the arts here in New Hampshire?

Stephen Cole via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/AMuDH

From 9 to 5 to The Office, we’ve got plenty of examples of cookie-cutter cubicles where workers toil away in soul-crushing boredom and fatigue. On today’s show, we flip the script and hear a defense of office life. 

Print media circling the drain, record and film companies battling piracy, the rise of cheap, reality TV: while some sectors have bounced back from the recession, creative industries seem to remain in peril. A former arts reporter ponders the decline of the creative class and what society loses when artists can’t make a living.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

www.windhamsd.org

After being among more than 7,000 teachers nationwide nominated for a music educator Grammy earlier this year, Jared Cassedy, director of fine arts for the Windham School District, is now one of 10 finalists for the award.

This is the second year the Grammys has handed out that award, which is meant to honor music teachers who’ve made an impact on students’ lives.

Cassedy spoke with Rick Ganley on Morning Edition.

What’s your reaction to being one of the ten finalists for this honor? Were you surprised?

© Ryann Ford - All Rights Reserved

Last year we interviewed photographer Ryann Ford about a project she was working on: traveling the country to preserve the humble American rest stop through a series of photographs. These are relics of a time when most people traveled by car on vacations, and as new super stops pop up along highways, the simple rest stop is becoming extinct.

A Luminous Dress Inspired By The Firefly

Nov 13, 2014
Charlie Lemay

Biologists call it “signaling”, traits and behaviors that evolved because recipients respond to them in ways that benefit the signaler. Among humans, signals may not be quite as overt as the peacock fanning its tail:

or fireflies courting and sparking on a summer night:

Jasperdo via flickr Creative Commons

Among the things we take for granted in today’s America is knowing the time, which makes transportation, business and national events possible. This, however, was not always the case.

On today’s show, from building sewers to standardizing time, we’ll talk about the invisible innovations that got us where we are today. Then, we’ll take a look back to a controversial figure at the center of Portsmouth’s historic preservation movement, Miss Dorothy Vaughan.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The streets of Portsmouth appear peaceful and idyllic this last week of summer. But just beneath the surface, all is not well in the Port City. On the Seacoast, recent responses to ongoing noise complaints have residents here in an uproar. 

Things got really crazy in Portsmouth on Tuesday. That’s when the Prescott Park Arts Festival canceled their end-of-the-season double feature film night after neighbors complained the noise would keep their kids up too late.

It was supposed to be 'Brave,' combined with 'Braveheart.'

Lady Liberty
Lorianne DiSabato / Flickr Creative Commons

Today's the big day at the 14th Annual Master Sand Sculpting Competition at New Hampshire's Hampton Beach.   Sculptures by some of the continent's best sand artists will be on display and be professionally judged for $15,000 in prizes that will be announced at 8 p.m. Saturday.  Sculpture fans also get to vote from 1 to 4 p.m. for the People's Choice Award.   A sand sculpting lesson will be offered from 1 to 3 p.m. to those who sign up at the Chamber of Commerce office near the sculptures.    Fireworks cap off the day at 9:30.

Division Of The Arts Lands New Director

Jun 16, 2014

New Hampshire will soon have a new director of the Department of Cultural Resources Division of the Arts. Ginnie Lupi comes to the position after serving of the executive director of the ARTS Council of the Southern Finger lakes in Corning, NY. Lupi will take over the position in August. I spoke with Lupi about her appointment as director and her plans for art in the Granite State:

What does the department do and what is your role in the Arts Division?

Note: At the request of a listener, this story was re-posted from NHPR's old website. The original air date was in September, 2010.

The New Hampshire Institute of Art is hosting the first public exhibit of original photographs from the private collection of Thomas Adams.

 

Adams has been collecting for decades and holds prints from many well known photographers. 

NHPR Correspondent Sean Hurley recently viewed the collection and spoke with Adams about his lifelong passion.