Arts and Culture

Danny Gregory / www.dannygregory.com

Danny Gregory is an author and illustrator whose work you might have seen in the New York Times or other publications. He’s also author of several books, including “An Illustrated Life” and “The Creative License.”  His newest is called “A Kiss Before You Go: A Memoir Of Love And Loss”. It’s a collection of illustrations and text compiled from daily drawings Danny did in the year following the death of his wife Patti.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

This week marks what would have been the 103rd birthday of Doris Haddock, better known by the name Granny D.

She made national headlines in the late 1990’s for walking across the country, 3200 miles, to highlight the issue of campaign finance reform, just ahead of her 90th birthday.

Doris Haddock died in 2010 at age 100, but you might be able to hear her voice at a birthday party in her honor in Keene.

Chris in Plymouth via Flickr Creative Commons

Our awesome-est content from a week of awesome programs. This week, robots get FDA approval to treat patients on the fly, a nurse becomes a patient to teach students how to care for the dying, we look back at the Piltdown Man hoax, and the 90's band Guster goes acoustic.

VikieVictoria via Flickr Creative Commons

Virginia Prescott chats candidly with Guster's Ryan Miller. Topics include: flying to the wrong city for a show, drawing album art on iPads, not wanting to listen to your own music, and the struggle to age gracefully as a band.

You can also listen and share on Soundcloud here:

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

The best and brightest segments from our daily program.

Trailer park residents who burst into song. Skilled crafts people who create an ode to toys. It’s just part of this weekend in New Hampshire. Amy Diaz joins us to give a few details on two rather unique happenings. Amy is the Editor of the Hippo, a paper that features some stories about a unique musical and League of NH Craftsman’s exhibit.

Check out the Great American Trailer Park Musical Blog

Here's a video playlist of music we talked about today with Melissa Locker based on her article for Time, 11 Albums to Look Forward to in 2013

NOTE: Please be aware that some of these songs contain explicit language.

Tegan and Sara: Closer

Lake Street Dive Gaining Momentum

Jan 8, 2013

How to Think More About Sex by Alain de Botton

The author and philosopher Alain de Botton addresses the chasm between our private feelings and real world experience of sex in “How to Think More About Sex."  It’s one of two new books in The School of Life Series – a smart and frequently funny twist on the “self-help” genre, which he curates.

Check out this short film that accompanies the book:

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth's weekly show...the best of the best of Word of Mouth.

Part 1:

A new study shows that the act of holding a gun changes perception, as participants saw guns that weren't actually there. And Clay Wirestone wraps up the latest in video game trends, and looks forward to what's coming in 2013

Part 2:

TED cracks down on pseudoscience at local spinoff TEDX conferences. And film critic Garen Daley tells us what we can expect on the big screen in 2013

Part 3:

We’re beginning the new year with some "culture-vores" about which trends and habits they expect to fade out or faze in during 2013… Joining us for more on the literary scene is Jason Boog, editor of the publishing news website Galley Cat...and, for more on what’s coming up for food in 2013, we asked Maine chef and cookbook author, Kathy Gunst – who cautions that watching for culinary trends is not an entirely objective undertaking.

Steven Andrew Photography via Flickr Creative Commons

Clay Wirestone is Arts Editor for the Concord Monitor and our favorite video game freak. He joins us to run down what's coming in gaming in 2013...and kills the screen on the trends of 2012.

Brett Jordan via Flickr Creative Commons

2012 was a banner year for big-screen comic book adaptations – Marvel’s The Avengers, was the top grossing film of the year, followed by the latest in the Batman franchise, The Dark Knight Rises.

The Audio Orchard Podcast for January

Jan 1, 2013
Kr. B. via Flickr Creative Commons

If you want an email notification ONCE A MONTH when a new podcast is out you can sign up here, and  you'll never miss it! Thanks!

At most art exhibits, guests aren't supposed to touch the works – though the current exhibit at Discover Portsmouth is the exception to that rule. In fact, some of the pieces won't work unless you touch them.

It's an exhibit called “In Motion,” and the artist, Kim Bernard, joins All Things Considered host Brady Carlson to talk about exploring movement through visual art.

Like any major life event, the annihilation of life as we know it deserves a soundtrack.  It’s easy to decide what to listen to when the four horsemen of the apocalypse are coming around the bend…So, for everybody hosting an “end of the world party” in the next 48 hours, we compiled a few suggestions to help you kick out the jams one final time.  

random ideal via Flickr Creative Commons

A new TV trend has emerged, "hate-watching," or staying true to shows that make you feel a little bit bad about yourself the morning.

This year we found hate-watch blogs on TV Guide, The Root, and TV.com, among other places. We've also compiled our own list, curated by Senior Producer and resident television addict Rebecca Lavoie.


The Case of the Missing Santa Claus

Dec 19, 2012

It’s a sad sign of holiday desperation that in many towns, burglaries and thefts spike around the holidays. Two years ago a landmark seasonal statue was stolen from a small New Hampshire town…now a gallery in Massachusetts is trying to find it through the power of art.

The Museum of Modern Art in New York recently added 14 video games to its permanent collection. Killscreen says they helped.

Killscreen co-founder Jamin Warren explains how, and helps us answer the burning question, are video games art?

Kids Don't Cry at This Santa's Workshop

Dec 13, 2012
Adam McCune

Been to the mall lately? If so, you’ve probably seen a long line of nervous kids waiting a turn to sit on Santa’s lap and give him their Christmas wish list. There’s another place in New Hampshire where kids can visit Santa Claus, though a bit off the beaten path. It’s arguably even more magical, with not a tearful tot in sight.

Word Of Mouth contributor Adam McCune bundled up his own kids to take us on this radio field trip just a wee bit south of the North Pole.

Sonia Blanco via Flickr Creative Commons

2012 has been a fantastic year for funny ladies on television. Comedians Chelsea Handler, Whitney Cummings, Mindy Kaling, Amy Poehler and Joan Rivers all star in their own shows. A number of lesser known laugh-out-loud women are reaching new audiences with self-produced podcasts, and networks are paying attention. 

Jean Railla, a writer and cultural observer based in New York City tells us more.

Hobbit Still MGM Studios

Corey Olsen, English Professor at Washington College and author of the book “Exploring J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit”, discusses the lasting appeal and tonal evolution of the classic children’s novel. 

Today we spoke with Robin Whitten, founder and editor of AudioFile magazine about the best books read by celebrities in 2012.

Five Surprising Radio Station Locales

Dec 6, 2012
Fernando Candeias via Flickr Creative Commons

We recently talked with psychologist  Amelia Rachel Hokule’a Borofsky about Radio La Colifata, the world’s first and largest radio station broadcast from a psychiatric facility. She made several visits to El Borda National Psychiatric Hospital in Buenos Aires to see, and hear Radio La Colifata for herself. 

It got us thinking about other unique places with radio broadcast frequencies. Here's our top five.

wiccked via Flickr Creative Commons

 Jonathan Harris is working to make the internet, or at least his corner of it, a more human experience by giving regular people the tools to become storytellers. As creator of Cowbird, he has built an online haven for vulnerable human thoughts, ideas, emotions, and stories.

Matthew B. Brown

In winter sports communities out west, ski lodges are shedding their antlers for a more contemporary decor. But does the cocoa taste as sweet? And will New England ever give up its slopeside a-frame aesthetic?

Virginia Prescott notices that recent movie reviews include as much critical analysis into facial hair as they do to cinematography, sound design and acting. Check out Virginia's take on the phenomenon here:


The Audio Orchard for December

Nov 29, 2012
Kr. B. via Flickr Creative Commons

The Audio Orchard explores music being made right here in New England, and introduces you to artists that find their way here while on tour. Each month, we hand pick a variety of songs to sample. Click HERE to listen and download on Soundcloud, or click the "Podcast" link on the right of this page for iTunes. Happy Listening!

UPDATE: I'm not a big fan of email subscriptions because they usually end up spamming your inbox, but if you want me to email you ONCE A MONTH when my new podcast is out you can sign up here, and that way you'll never miss it! Thanks!

njtrout_2000 via Flickr Creative Commons

In 2002, Concord Monitor writer Mike Pride received a letter in the mail mentioning two pieces of authentic Civil War correspondence. A Civil War buff since he was a teenager, Mike soon discovered that New Hampshire was teeming with historic accounts of the soldiers and families that served in the Union Army. 

http://www.mergingartsproductions.com

The 2012 Short Short Story Film Festival comes to New Hampshire Technical Institute’s Sweeney Auditorium in Concord this Friday and Saturday. Now in its sixth year, the festival explores a form of film-making that values depth and story over screen-time.

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