Arts and Culture

dafyd via Flickr Creative Commons

With the glut of content available on Netflix, cable, and even YouTube, summertime TV longer has the monopoly on re-runs. Well, a new study reveals that watching reruns doesn’t only kill time. It may actually be good for you.  Tom Jacobs is a science writer with Pacific Standard.

Plus...we did a little man-on-the-street survey about re-runs, asking regular folks, "What show or movie can you watch over and over again?" 

Al Green via his Facebook Page

Some conversations you just can't pass up. For me, talking to this man was one of them.

When The Reverend Al Green takes the stage at the Music Hall in Portsmouth tonight, many people will be able to sing along with his hits. We reached him before he left for Portsmouth to explore some of the lesser known songs of the man who has aided in countless seductions.

Chris Matthews is best known for his opinionated and combative style on his MSNBC program, "Hardball with Chris Matthews."

What's lesser known is that he's a former print journalist, was a long-time aide to Tip O'Neill, and that he grew up in an Irish Catholic family...of Republicans. All this played no small part in sewing the seeds of his admiration for a man he'd later write two books about, John F. Kennedy.

If you ever decide to visit one of the largest museums of contemporary art in the world, prepare yourself: It's a little intimidating. First, you have to drive to upper Massachusetts, just south of the Vermont border, where you'll behold 26 hulking brick buildings: We're talking 600,000 square feet of raw, sunlit space, roughly equivalent to a mid-sized airport.

Palace Theatre

Aug 17, 2012

In addition to staging plays and concerts, The Palace Theater runs educational and cultural programs to engage community in the performing arts. Rebecca Gosselin is 12. She has participated in the Palace’s youth theatre programs for four years.

Horia Varlan, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

A group of arts and media business owners have formed a coalition hoping to encourage film and TV production in the Granite State. 

The New Hampshire Production Coalition is currently developing a legislative plan that would help New Hampshire compete with more film-friendly states like Massachusetts, Michigan, New Mexico, and Louisiana.

Tim Egan, of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences, is the coalition’s president.

“Film, television, digital design, video gamers…  All the creative economy type industries don’t really have a trade association.”

chrisinplymouth via Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1:

The Blackout Boom

A Far-Flung Festival

Aug 2, 2012
Greta Rybus

Last weekend I went to the Ossipee Valley Music Festival in my hometown of Hiram, Maine.  The festival takes place at the local fairground, with the music stages set up in the midst of 4-H barns.

Inspired Lives: David Carroll

Aug 1, 2012
David Carroll, courtesy of the artist

Naturalist-artist David M. Carroll is the author of three acclaimed natural histories.  Swampwalker's Journal, for which he received the John Burroughs medal for distinguished nature writing, The Year of the Turtle, and Trout Reflections. David graduated from the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University, and received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of New Hampshire and an Honorary Masters in Environmental Science from New England College. In 2006 he was named a MacArthur Foundation Fellow.

Inspired Lives: Artist Wolf Kahn

Jul 25, 2012
Courtesy of the artist.

Wolf Kahn was born in Stuttgart, Germany  in 1927 and came to the United States when he was 12-years-old. He later served in the Navy during WWII, and in 1946, under the GI Bill, Kahn attended the Hans Hofmann School, studying under and becoming a studio assistant for Hans Hofmann. Later, Kahn graduated from the University of Chicago. His work in oil paint and pastel mediums share his signature vibrant style. He spends his time in both New York City and West Brattleboro, Vermont. Kahn's wife Emily Mason is also an artist.

TRANSCRIPT

Next week the band Level3 will perform at the Lane Memorial Library in Hampton - despite the fact that Level3 is a fictional band.

Confused yet? Not to worry – it’s all part of a new young adult novel called Reunited, in which three young women drive from New England to Texas to see the one-night-only reunion concert of their once-favorite band, Level 3.

Inspired Lives: Wesley McNair

Jul 18, 2012
Malcom Cochran

Award-winning poet and New Hampshire native Wesley McNair was born in Newport, grew up in the Connecticut River Valley, and has lived for many years in Mercer, Maine, the state for which he has been named Poet Laureate. Drawing from his personal experiences, McNair's poetry is emblematic of both family and economic hardships, and New England living.

Inspired Lives: Eric Aho

Jul 11, 2012

Eric Aho grew up in Hudson, New Hampshire and now lives just across the border in Saxtons River, Vermont. In the tradition of English painters like John Constable and the French Impressionists, Aho began sketching and painting out of doors using New England’s mountain vistas and rural valleys as his subjects. His early paintings capture dramatic effects of weather and sunlight in a muted pallet, while his more recent paintings are monumental in scale and employ bold colors.

Public Pianos Help HOP Celebrate 50 Years

Jul 10, 2012
Todd Bookman / NHPR

Dartmouth’s Hopkins Center for the Arts turns 50-years old this summer. Instead of candles, the HOP is going with…pianos.

The Rochester Opera House is a historic theater located in the Rochester city hall. It has been a center of community and community entertainment for more than a century. Now it is leased and operated as a non-profit, bringing a variety of shows and performance opportunities to the community. Shay Willard started acting there as a sixth grader; he is now a graduate student in film production and is directing a play at the opera house.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

The State Library in Concord has completed renovations in its second floor Map Room and, this summer the public will find an exhibit there called “Shaping our Heritage: Celebrating Traditional Arts Apprenticeships in New Hampshire.”

The first thing you notice when you walk into the State Library’s map room is the natural light.  It pours in from the white laminate skylights of the arched coffered ceiling.  Every item on display, lining the perimeter walls and the center installations, is accompanied by photographs of the artists always in pairs.

In January, a listener clued us into the fabulous arts blog, Gwarlingo . We invited its curator, Michelle Aldredge, to join us on the show and quickly figured out why Gwarlingo is such a delightful, beautifully-executed site. Back then it was Michelle’s side venture – since then, Michelle has quit her job and  taken Gwarlingo full-time, so she’s back to tell us how it’s going.  

Moonrise Kingdom Trailer

MeineKnipserei / Flickr

Produced with Emma Ruddock

Brady Carlson, NHPR

For this Memorial Day we wanted to tell you about a unique art installation at the New Hampshire National Guard headquarters in Concord.

It’s a series of paintings by Elaine Morrison of Laconia, depicting soldiers at war. She tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about the paintings.

Dreaming again

May 4, 2012

As part of our yearlong series, New Hampshire’s Immigration Story, NHPR’s Keith Shields attended a performance of “Dreaming Again’ and brings you this report.

photo: Sean Hurley / NHPR

A new exhibit at the Edwards Art Gallery at the Holderness School features 19th Century landscapes of the Lakes Region, Pemigewasset Valley, Franconia Notch, and the North Country.

After shooting in London, Barcelona and Paris, Woody Allen made his latest European backdrop Rome. To Rome With Love opens Friday in Italy — in Italian.

The movie is a magnificent postcard of the eternal city — a carefree romp along cobblestone streets nestled between ancient ruins and Renaissance palaces. A soft yellow glow pervades every scene. It projects an image of the sweet life with all the charms under the Italian sun, set to the tune of old standbys like "Volare" and "Arrivederci Roma."

If you weren't a college theater major, you can be forgiven for not knowing much about commedia dell'arte, the 500-year-old theatrical tradition that Carlo Goldoni used for his comedy The Servant of Two Masters in 1743. Contemporary playwright Richard Bean has adapted that play into the decidedly British laugh riot One Man, Two Guvnors -- and he says all you really need to know about commedia is ... well, it's funny.

Zach Houston runs his Poem Store (on any given sidewalk) with these items: a manual typewriter, a wooden folding chair, scraps of paper, and a white poster board that reads: "POEMS — Your Topic, Your Price."

Houston usually gets from $2 to $20 for a poem, he says. He's received a $100 bill more than once. The Oakland, Calif., resident has been composing spontaneous street poems in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2005. Five years ago, it became his main source of income.

Art Based Literacy Reaches out to NH Refugee Students

Nov 16, 2011

In 2009 Beth Olshansky, a pioneer in a theory of education called "art based literacy" brought her ideas to Webster Elementary school in Manchester.  Olshansky worked with the school's large immigrant and refugee population, many of whom hardly spoke English, by having them illustrate then write a book on the stories of their lives. It was successful. The following year, Moharimet Elementary School in Madbury caught wind of the project and decided to bring a new group of Webster students over there to have them write their stories together.

Confectionary Architects

Feb 14, 2008
Cheryl Senter

For those of you who like a little dessert after dinner, a trip to Canterbury Shaker Village might be in order this weekend.

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