Arts & Culture

It's the first weekend of summer in New Hampshire and the calendar is full of fun and interesting things to do. Get to it. Here are 5 things (plus a little extra) going on this weekend in the Granite State.

(Check out the NHPR community calendar for more events ... and visit the NHPR Folk Music Festival Calendar here)

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

In honor of the summer solstice arriving Thursday, sum up this season by writing a haiku—the traditional Japanese poem—and join the celebration on New Hampshire Public Radio's Twitter account @NHPR

Use the hashtag #SummerHaiku.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A woman intertwined with a 12-foot bottle of alcohol won first place in the 18th Annual Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Classic

Abe Waterman of Prince Edward Island, Canada, says his sculpture, which also included a devil on the back side and is titled "Temptation," represents the vices in life.

Second place went to Mélineige Beauregard from Montreal, Canada, with the sculpture "Rising." Third Place went to Dan Belcher from Missouri. His piece was called "Water Dance."

Here are 5 things to do in New Hampshire on this summer-like weekend. 

And check out NHPR's community calendar for more events and weekend ideas.

The interlude is polished and playful.

“I have something very special coming up here. I just kind of have to set the stage .... we have a giraffe that’s going to be performing with us out here.”

The audience laughs away.

This is the opening of a song track on one of The Shaw Brothers’ records. They’re playing live at Prescott Park in Portsmouth. And if you’ve ever enjoyed a concert at the Prescott Park Arts Festival, you can just imagine the giraffe was either a prop or a set painting for a youth theater act that used the stage earlier.

Nice weather this weekend opens up a world of possibilities in New Hampshire, from the coast to the White Mountains and beyond. Here are five things to do—plus a little extra. For additional ideas, check out NHPR’s community calendar (and contribute your events).

Peter Biello/NHPR

 

New Hampshire officials are accepting nominations for the state's next poet laureate.

Alice Fogel, currently serving as New Hampshire's poet laureate, will complete her term next year after serving five years as an ambassador for poets across the state.

Former New Hampshire poets laureate include Walter Butts, Patricia Fargnoli, Donald Hall and Marie Harris.

City of Boston Archives / Flickr Creative Commons

The book Astral Weeks: A Secret History of 1968 is an in-depth look at some famous and-not-so-famous figures that all seemed to converge in and around Boston in that one year. 

The catalyst for author Ryan Walsh’s book was the author’s love for Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks album- what many consider the singer-songwriter’s masterpiece- and the little-known fact that Morrison wrote much of the songs for it in Boston.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Ryan Walsh by Skype to learn more.

Sam Hurley

Do you regularly misplace your keys and wonder why?  Have you ever heard the awful rumor that you snore at night? Or worse, that you talk to yourself? Recently, NHPR’s Sean Hurley - with a little help from his wife and some audio recordings – has found himself coming to terms with these and more.

“I do not snore,” I told my wife. She raised her eyebrows and the next day played me a recording she made on her phone, of me snoring during the night.

“You also talk to yourself,” she said. 

“I do not,” I said. “I might snore – rarely - but I don’t talk to myself. Ever.”

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

Eating local in New Hampshire can mean more than just stopping by the farmers' market. For more adventurous residents, it means foraging for wild ingredients – like seaweed, straight from the Seacoast.

NHPR’s Annie Ropeik reports this old culinary tradition is getting a second life. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Frank Bidart, who was in New Hampshire in November to accept the 2017 Hall-Kenyon Prize in American Poetry, has won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry for his "Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2016."

The Pulitzer committee judges wrote of Bidart's book of poems: "A volume of unyielding ambition and remarkable scope that mixes long dramatic poems with short elliptical lyrics, building on classical mythology and reinventing forms of desires that defy societal norms."

PaddlingFilmFestival.com

 

A tour of the Paddling Film Festival is set to make a stop in Concord at the Red Rivers Theatre.

The annual festival features whitewater, adventure, canoeing and sea kayaking films at over 120 venues around the world, making several appearances in the U.S., Canada and overseas.

 

The movie trailers can be viewed at paddlingfilmfestival.com .

 

The event on Wednesday is hosted by New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, the Northern Forest Canoe Trail and the Contoocook River Canoe Company.

 

Juan Felipe Herrera, the 21st U.S. Poet Laureate, is in New Hampshire this week.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Herrera about his plans to visit the Nashua Adult Learning Center to talk with a class of international English language learners.


Sam Hurley

Concord lost one of its most provocative landmarks last Thursday night when artist Thomas Devaney closed his giant Eye for good.  For the last five years the foam and wood sculpture came to life after dark when Devaney turned on his projector and lit the 6-foot by 8-foot structure with a filmed loop of his own blue right eye. NHPR’s Sean Hurley attended the closing of the Eye and sends us this. 

NHPR Photo

Robert Frost is often praised for the colloquialism of his poetry. His work is accessible, exploring complex ideas through scenes and images of rural life. Though he came to typify the region, Frost was not born in New England. 

His first years were spent in San Francisco, and his adolescence in Lawrence, Mass. In fact, frost didn’t discover rural life until his short-lived attendance at Dartmouth College. But New Hampshire stuck.

CREDIT COURTESY KEENE STATE COLLEGE/LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

There's always a certain retrospective zeal to the Oscars. It's part of what will make the 90th Academy Awards this Sunday so interesting: Past meets Present, Present winks and tips its hat

Sean Hurley

While visiting Shelburne recently, NHPR’s Sean Hurley heard about Sally Manikian. She's a local dog musher - yes, that's unusual, but for reasons more than that, reasons he couldn’t quite discover, she'd caught the town’s attention.  What, he wondered, made Sally Manikian so … well, interesting to her neighbors? He went to find out.

Currier Museum of Art

The Currier Museum of Art in Manchester is presenting the work of American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens in an exhibit that runs through May 20th.  Saint-Gaudens was the most important American sculptor of the late 19th and early 20th century, and this is the first major museum exhibit of his work in New England in more than 30 years.  

Sean Hurley

When NHPR’s Sean Hurley heard the Alton Bay Ice Runway opened last week, he asked a pilot friend what landing at the only official ice airport in the continental United States was like. Instead of telling Sean, that friend offered to give him a first-hand ice landing experience.

We’re 100 feet above the grey-green ice of Lake Winnipesaukee in Bob Hirshfield’s 50 year old Piper Cherokee - flying low because of unexpected turbulence – and because, according to Bob,   it’s more fun.

Mary McIntyre

 

Ice Castles in Lincoln -- a giant ice structure spanning over an acre and weighing over 25,000,000 pounds -- has become a popular winter attraction in New Hampshire.

But how is this giant structure made, and maintained over the winter season? Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with site manager Tayler Christensen who gave him a behind the scenes tour.

 

(Editor's note: this transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.)  

How tall is that, about 30 feet or so? That archway?

Hairspray at PSU

Jan 26, 2018
Sam Hurley

The Education Theater Collaborative at Plymouth State University has been around since 1994. Every year, the ETC brings professionals, students and community members together for one big musical extravaganza. NHPR’s Sean Hurley spoke with the cast and crew of this year’s show, Hairspray, and sends us this. 

Sean Hurley

A long time ago - in this galaxy - I was sitting on the floor of a strange house in a room lit only by the cathode flicker of Milton Berle or Henny Youngman - or maybe it was Bob Hope?

 

Editor's note: We recommend listening to this story by Sean Hurley

“Boy, I feel great tonight!” Bob Hope began his 1966 routine on Milton Berle’s show, “I’m using a new oil on my hair. But I don’t know what to do with the sardines!”  

Abhi Sharma / Wikimedia Commons

Downtown Manchester and the Millyard have undergone redevelopment over the past decade with the opening of new restaurants and shops. But now residents are getting an independent bookstore.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Liz Hitchcock, co-owner of The Bookery Manchester, which will open this spring. And she plans to make this bookstore more than another retail establishment downtown, but also a gathering place for the community.

Composer Amy Beach was born in Henniker in 1867.  By the time she was 29 she was famous the world over for being the first American woman to write a symphony.

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of her birth, the University of New Hampshire has been honoring Amy Beach with a series of special performances.  NHPR’s Sean Hurley recently visited the school to learn more about the composer - and her music.

NHPR File

Dan Brown just completed "Origin," another Robert Langdon thriller, but he says the fictional Harvard professor is unlikely to appear in his next novel.

The best-selling author spoke about his latest book and his favorite main character in an interview with the 10-Minute Writer's Workshop.

Before a recent Writers on a New England Stage at The Music Hall in Portsmouth, host Virginia Prescott asked Brown, "Can you imagine writing a book without him?"

Cori Princell/NHPR

For the past few months, visitors to the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester have had a chance to spend quality time with the artist Claude Monet.  Since July, the museum has had an exhibition, Monet: Pathways to Impressionism, showing works by the famous French painter. This is the final weekend to see it – it closes Monday.  

It’s just 4 paintings, in a small gallery with the walls painted deep red.  But together, the works tell a story about the artist.

Speculative fiction is a genre that takes us into a previously unimagined world - a world that, with a few plausible tweaks, becomes utopian, dystopian, or something else entirely. 

The Neukom Institute for Computational Science at Dartmouth Colllege is announcing the establishment of the Neukom Institute Literary Arts Awards, a global program to honor works of speculative fiction. 

Daniel Rockmore, director of the institute, joins Peter Biello to talk about the awards.

Listen to the interview:

Carly Glovinski

The Museum of Art at UNH in Durham is presenting the work of fifteen artists, all of whom are past recipients of the prestigious Piscataqua Region Artist Advancement Grant

The show, "Impact,” opens with a reception on Oct. 26 and runs through Dec. 15.

Mary McIntyre / NHPR

The Hood Museum at Dartmouth College is presenting its first ever sound art exhibition this fall. Resonant Spaces: Sound Art at Dartmouth features seven installations throughout campus and the town of Hanover.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley took a tour of the installations with Amelia Kahl, the associate curator of academic programming for the museum.


courtesy of Conrad Young

A watercolor artist from Concord is passionate about painting and documenting covered bridges all over New Hampshire.

Conrad Young met Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley in Warner at the Dalton, his favorite covered bridge, to talk about his book featuring the Granite State's covered bridges.


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