Authors

waltarrrrr via Flickr Creative Commons

Adrian Zuniga is creator and MC of the literary death match – where the stage becomes an arena, author readings are battles, and the warring wordsmiths are judged by a panel of peers.  Adrian has held literary death matches all over the country and on Friday night, the games begin at the Brattleboro book festival

xlibber via Flickr Creative Commons

Producer's note: Unfortunately, technical difficulties on Tom's end prevented him from being able to join us for this segment...but as he's one of our favorite writers, we will make every attempt to get him on the program soon! /RL

Thoreau Remembered

Oct 5, 2012

Henry David Thoreau's death 150 years ago has inspired memorial events in Concord - the Massachusetts Concord - but Thoreau passed through our Concord on a trip by boat and foot that led to his first book.

angelofsweetbitter2009 via Flickr Creative Commons

If you grew up in a religious home with a portrait of Jesus on the wall, he was probably portrayed as brown-haired, brown eyed, and Caucasian.  But have you ever wondered why a Judaic man born in the Middle East would look like an aquiline-nosed Northern European?  Edward J. Blum is a professor of history at San Diego State University, and along with Paul Harvey, is author of “The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America".  

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on August 26. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

"Dare Me" is a new and much buzzed about book by Megan Abbott. The cheerleaders at Sutton Grove High have more to think about than their spray tans. Their pretty, hard-driving coach holds the squad in her thrall. She has less control over her own life, which opens up a dark tale of jealousy, physical and psychological abuse, and a mysterious death. 

Aside from reading the book, Executive Producer Rebecca Lavoie watched Bring It On, like, fifty times for  "research":

Bauhan Publishing

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on July 1. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

Author Ray Bradbury has died, his daughter tells The Associated Press. The wire service says Bradbury passed away Tuesday night.

(Photo courtesy the author)

Anyone who’s read Anna Quindlen’s Pulitzer Prize winning op-eds, or wildly popular  columns in the New York Times knows that she doesn’t hold back from pointed commentary on topics from politics to parenting. In the mid-nineties, Quindlen left the Times to write – so far -- ten best-selling non-fiction books and four  novels, including One True Thing, which was adapted into a film starring Meryl Streep.

jdn via flickr creative commons

During this country's early years, military service was considered the price of citizenship in a free society. Over time, veterans gained in prestige, especially after World War II. Our wars since – some unpopular -- have brought about new attitudes. In his new book, Those Who Have Borne the Battle: A History of America's Wars and Those Who Fought Them, former Dartmouth College President James Wright describes the complicated relationship between this country and its military. 

 

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