Barack Obama

Painter Jon McNaughton doesn’t do subtle. in his latest painting, a barely recognizable President Obama peers from the canvas with narrowed eyes, clutching a burning copy of the Constitution. It’s not something you’d find at the Whitney Biennial…but it is all over Fox News and YouTube.

Michael Hastings wrote about the art market’s reaction to the controversial painter for Buzzfeed.

Historically, young people have been much less likely to vote than older Americans.

That trend has started to change in the past few presidential election cycles, especially in 2008, when a census report found that 49 percent of those ages 18 to 24 who were eligible to vote participated in the presidential election.

Obama’s war on Alzheimer’s, last year, the president signed the national Alzheimer’s project act – which set in motion a plan to combat the degenerative disease that currently affects more than 5 million Americans, and costs more than two-hundred billion dollars in health-care costs.  Going forward, the financial stakes are even higher: the Alzheimer’s association projects the disease will cost the US over one-trillion dollars by the year 2050.   Now, a final draft of the Alzheimer’s initiative aims to curb those costs with ambitious benchmarks, which is making waves in the medical communit

Romney, GOP Pounce On Obama's Russia Comment

Mar 27, 2012

President Obama went to South Korea to talk about nuclear security, only to find that the presidential campaign followed him there.

Obama is now facing sharp criticism from Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and other GOP figures following comments he made Monday, in seeming confidence, to Russian President Dmitry Medvedev.

As reporters gathered for a news conference in Seoul, South Korea, Obama leaned over to his Russian counterpart. Without realizing a microphone was open, he said:

It's the hottest ticket in Washington, D.C. Even the flossiest lawyers in town can't get a seat. Senators, congressmen, Cabinet and White House officials are all vying for a place.

At the U.S. Supreme Court, people have been lining up for days, waiting to hear this week's historic oral arguments on President Obama's health care law. The arguments will last for six hours over a three-day period, the longest argument in more than 40 years.


An official with Obama administration came to Manchester today to tout the achievements of the Affordable Care Act.

At an event organized by the federal Department of Health and Human Services, New Hampshire residents told their stories of how the health-care law had improved their lives.

As the Supreme Court gets ready to hear a case involving the constitutionality of President Obama's health care overhaul, social scientists are asking a disturbing — and controversial — question: Do the intense feelings about the health care overhaul among ordinary Americans stem from their philosophical views about the appropriate role of government, or from their racial attitudes about the signature policy of the country's first black president?

There was a big movie premier Thursday — big in the political world, anyway. This movie is actually an ad of sorts, designed in hopes that it will go viral and help President Obama's re-election prospects.

We'll bring you live NPR coverage today of President Obama's news conference during which he is expected to discuss the situation in Syria, concerns over Iran's nuclear program and the U.S. economy.

Listen on nhpr and at 1 p.m.

While Republican candidates continue to slug it out for their party's White House nomination, President Obama is getting a head start on the general election.

Obama's grassroots campaign is already hard at work with volunteers hosting house parties and staffing phone banks to find and mobilize the president's supporters. The campaign has opened five offices in Virginia, and that's not counting the basement of Sue Langley's house in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Vienna, where more than a dozen volunteers assembled this past weekend.

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President Obama visited Nashua Community College in New Hampshire today to discuss his plans to reduce foreign oil dependence. The president's official speech released by the White House appears below in its entirety.

Josh Rogers

 President Barack Obama was in New Hampshire today talking about energy. As New Hampshire Public Radio’s Josh Rogers reports, the president said the country needs to increase oil production while also investing in newer sources of energy.

Billed an official visit, at times the President’s stop had the feel of campaign rally. Mr. Obama told the crowd he knew NH’s "political bull detector" was sharp, and urged voters to be wary of election year promises.


President Obama will travel to Nashua Thursday to talk about the economy. It will be his first trip to the state since November, when he visited Manchester Central high school to promote extending the payroll tax cut as part of a jobs bill.

The trip come a week after Vice President Joe Biden stumped for the President’s reelection at the New Hampshire Institute for Art. Biden was on a three-state jaunt raising money for Democrats.

President Obama spoke Wednesday at the formal groundbreaking for the Smithsonian's newest museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. The museum, Obama said, has been "a long time coming" and will serve "not just as a record of tragedy, but as a celebration of life."

At Wednesday's groundbreaking ceremony, President Obama said the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., would be not just a record of tragedy, but a celebration of life.

"It is on this spot — alongside the monuments to those who gave birth to this nation, and those who worked so hard to perfect it — that generations will remember the sometimes difficult, often inspirational, but always central role that African-Americans have played in the life of our country," he said.

The new CBS News/NY Times poll definitely contains the kind of information that could put a little spring in any president's step.

Pete Souza/White House photo

E - The Environmental Magazine


Dear EarthTalk: What are the environmental implications of the road ahead as laid out by President Obama in his recent State of the Union? -- Marilyn Pike, Bethesda, MD


There's been no let-up in the debate about the Obama administration's rule requiring most employers to provide prescription birth control to their workers without additional cost.

Here's the rub: The only truly novel part of the plan is the "no cost" bit.

The rule would mean, for the first time, that women won't have to pay a deductible or copayment to get prescription contraceptives.

NHPR's Brady Carlson, host of All Things Considered provides us with brain food from the Internet buffet - including the censorship of Twitter.  


Beats so fresh, they aren't even born yet.


The big story of the day is, of course, President Obama's State of the Union address last night. Since the speech wrapped, analysis from politicos, pundits, and wonks has been pretty much non-stop.


NHPR brings you live coverage via NPR as President Obama delivers his State of the Union address tonight, January 24 at 9 p.m. EST.

NPR's Melissa Block will host this live coverage. She'll be joined in-studio by NPR National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.

Facing into an election year, the President is expected to continue pushing Congress on his economic agenda. The GOP response will be given by Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels.

Tune-in to NHPR and tonight at 9 p.m.


Photo by, floridanaturephotography, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

The latest twist in the Obama administration’s so-called Asian pivot. The president’s chief science advisor, John Holdren, has said the US would benefit from cooperating with China on future space missions. But federal legislation now prohibits NASA from pursuing such efforts with a little known clause that’s popped up in two pieces of legislation within the past year.

Tonight, President Obama is set to deliver the final state of the union address of his first term. Morning Edition's Renee Montagne spoke to White House Senior Adviser David Plouffe for a preview of the president's speech.

Campaigning in New Hampshire, Republican Mitt Romney accused President Obama of creating a bad business climate.

Romney said the President’s policies are designed to help his political allies more than the country as a whole.

He told voters in Salem that President Obama packed the National Labor Relations Board with union stooges; that he used the stimulus to repay public sector unions, and that the President backed green jobs initiatives to benefit supporters at companies like Solyndra.

Obama Fires Up Supporters in Manchester

Nov 22, 2011

President Obama is pressuring Republicans to pass an extension of a payroll tax cut.  That message was well received at a speech the president delivered at Manchester Central High School yesterday.

The president says if passed, the payroll tax cut would put 1500 dollars in the pocket of the average household.  Mr. Obama challenged Republicans to vote down an extension, even if it means raising taxes on the wealthiest Americans.

Shannon Chandley of Amherst said she supports the president and faults the GOP for refusing to compromise.

Obama Presses GOP on Tax Cuts

Nov 22, 2011

President Obama promoted his job creation plan in Manchester today.  The president focused on one specific item in that plan, the extension of a payroll tax cut.

Obama:  Hello NH.  It is good to be back

At the packed gymnasium of Manchester Central High School, a feisty Mr. Obama said next week, Republicans on Capitol Hill will get the chance to prove whose side they are on.

"Do you want to help working families get back on solid ground," he asked,  "Or do you really want to vote to raise taxes on nearly 160 million Americans during the holidays?"