Bernie Sanders

Bernie-mania hit Vatican City today with a crush of Italian media, cameras, boom microphones, shouting reporters and a ring of civilians, smartphones held aloft, chanting "Bernie, Bernie, Bernie!"

Sanders was not there to meet with Pope Francis, who is on the road himself visiting a refugee camp in Greece. The Democratic hopeful had accepted an invitation from the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences to speak at a conference on social and economic justice.

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president, the first of Sanders' fellow members of the U.S. Senate to do so.

In a New York Times op-ed, Merkley wrote that Sanders is "boldly and fiercely addressing the biggest challenges facing our country." Merkley praised the Vermont senator for opposition to international trade deals, his push for renewable energy, his calls to crack down on big banks, and his fight to address campaign finance laws.

There's a lot on the line for both parties in Tuesday's Wisconsin contest. For Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, the state is a prime chance to stop Donald Trump and complicate the GOP front-runner's path to the nomination. For Bernie Sanders, a win over Hillary Clinton helps close his delegate deficit and gives the Vermont senator new momentum heading into the next stretch of the primary calendar.

Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz each notched victories in Tuesday's Western contests, but Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's big wins in Arizona still mean their overall delegate lead won't change much.

On the Democratic side, Sanders won big victories in the Utah and Idaho caucuses, but the much smaller prizes could end up netting him roughly the same number of delegates Clinton will get from her Arizona win.

Bernie Sanders was able to win in Michigan, upsetting Hillary Clinton, with the support of white men. (NPR's Tamara Keith laid that out in this post this morning). Sanders won 62% of white men in the Michigan Democratic primary, while Clinton won 68% of black voters. That is a big share, but wasn't enough — and certainly smaller than the margins she's gotten among black voters in Southern states.

When Bernie Sanders won the primary in Michigan last week, it shook up the narrative of the Democratic race.

Sanders did so with the help of white men. If he's able to pull off a victory in Ohio, the same demographic will likely be key.

Take Jim, who describes himself, only half jokingly, as an angry white man.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We'll look at the results from the many states that voted yesterday - from Alaska to Massachusetts - and how it all affects the presidential nomination process that began just a month ago in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Hillary Clinton goes into Super Tuesday with a 26-pledged-delegate lead (91-65) over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. She also has a 433-superdelegate lead (453-20).

In crunching some numbers, an NPR analysis finds one very rosy scenario for Sanders in which he comes out with the majority of pledged delegates on Super Tuesday. This is considered unlikely, but it's his best possible day.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

The Democratic Party is facing pushback over its rules around super-delegates, as voters question whether the system will end up hindering Bernie Sanders’s chance at the nomination despite the results of the popular vote in New Hampshire's primary.

Logan Shannon for NHPR

Bernie Sanders’ win in the New Hampshire Primary last week shook up the Democratic presidential race.

But what might that victory mean for state-level Democratic politics in New Hampshire, where Sanders’ unapologetically liberal style stands in stark contrast to the more cautious approach favored by the state’s Democratic leaders?

Recent claims about Bernie Sanders' economic proposals are hurting the Democratic Party, say four former White House economists.

This past Sunday during 11 a.m. worship service at Bible Way Church of Atlas Road in Columbia, S.C., there was a short celebration of Black History Month. The church honored John Wesley Matthews Jr., a long-serving black state senator.

After Matthews accepted an award, the pastor of the church, Darrell Jackson Sr., took time to acknowledge another special guest.

Since he first announced his presidential campaign, Bernie Sanders has stuck to one simple promise. One that has many young people, in particular, #feelingthebern: free college.

As Sanders put it in his New Hampshire victory speech: "When we need the best-educated workforce in the world, yes, we are going to make public colleges and universities tuition-free."

The Pitch

Kate Harper for NHPR

The New Hampshire Republican Party wants the state's Democratic superdelegates to support Vermont U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders in his bid for the party's presidential nomination.

(Note: Tonight's debate, moderated by PBS NewsHour anchors Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff, will be simulcast on CNN and NPR and streamed live on NPR.org. NPR's Tamara Keith will be part of the debate broadcast, providing analysis during and after the event.)

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton meet Thursday night on a debate stage in Milwaukee. It's their first face-to-face matchup since Tuesday's New Hampshire primary where Sanders beat Clinton by more than 20 points.

New Hampshire Primary 2016: Recapping the Results

Feb 10, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Last night, the Granite State gave solid victories to Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republican Donald Trump, with John Kasich grabbing a coveted second place the GOP side.  We'll review the results, and what might be next as the candidates pack up their Granite State gear and head to contests elsewhere in the country.

Logan Shannon for NHPR

For Bernie Sanders, the New Hampshire Democratic primary was over before his after-party got started.

The gymnasium at Concord High School was not even half-full, and many supporters were still being wanded by the Secret Service when the news broke that, with with just 8 percent of precincts reporting, CNN had declared Sanders the winner.

The roar from the crowd as deafening.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders held his final campaign event before the primary at UNH last night, a concert intended to encourage students to vote, and featuring the group Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic zeros, among others.

Following a few hours of performances, the Sanders campaign bus finally rolled off the snowy roads from a campaign stop at Pinkerton Academy in Manchester.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

For months after announcing his White House bid, Bernie Sanders didn’t run a single campaign commercial on television. But he was everywhere online: emails, social media posts and paid ads on desktop computers and mobile devices.

Sanders has spent $10 million building a presence on the Internet, more than anyone else running for president this year. While the Vermont senator has hardly turned his back on TV, he’s betting that the voters most likely to embrace his vision for the country are online, not in front of a 50” flat-screen.

The two hottest candidates heading into the New Hampshire primary Tuesday are Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. On the face of it, the candidates and their messages couldn't be more different.

One is a billionaire businessman; the other, a career politician who rails against billionaires. But Sanders and Trump actually have more in common than you might think.

First, there are are the obvious similarities. They both have trademark hair and were raised in New York City. And then there's the way they say "huge":

Young voters in Iowa helped propel Sen. Bernie Sanders to a close second-place finish in the Democratic presidential race. He’ll be looking for similar results here in New Hampshire, but the trick for Sanders will be to translate youthful excitement into actual votes.

Primary season has officially begun. And as the presidential candidates campaign ahead of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, both Republicans and Democrats are making big arguments in response to some big questions about their party's future.

Is there such a thing as an "establishment lane" that can win the GOP contest? Can a Democrat be both moderate and a progressive? Is it better to be pragmatic or idealistic?

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has said he is a different kind of candidate running a different kind of campaign. He doesn't have a SuperPAC and he doesn't want one. One of the things his supporters say they like about him is Sanders isn't a typical politician.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Jason Kirkwood, a machinist born and raised in Rochester, came to a Bernie Sanders campaign rally after work on Thursday.

While he’s has come across plenty of Clinton fans here in his hometown, “I think there’s a lot of Bernie supporters. I think it’s kind of divided,” he said, “I think there’s a lot of Hillary supporters but I personally don’t like her because I truly think she’s a pawn in the game to the corporate leaders.”

Jason Moon for NHPR

Last night, all eyes were on the Democratic presidential contenders as they sparred in their final debate before the New Hampshire Primary. Voters who turned out to see them, at the University of New Hampshire, ranged from firmly decided to not yet sure.

The fifth debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders was their first appearance as a duet, and that helped to highlight some of their harmony – even as it heightened their crescendos of dissonance.

With Martin O'Malley having suspended his campaign earlier in the week, the two remaining rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination met in New Hampshire on Thursday night — on stage together for nearly two hours.

"I happen to respect the secretary very much; I hope it's mutual," said Sanders.

And Clinton reciprocated:

AP Photo/David Goldman

Hillary Clinton says she hopes New Hampshire voters bring both their hearts and heads with them when they vote in the state primary Tuesday.

Clinton said in her closing statement in Thursday's debate that she doesn't want voters to choose between the candidate they support emotionally and the one they back intellectually.

Clinton says she will bring her heart to the presidency, but "we have to get our heads together" to solve problems facing the country.

Bernie Sanders ended the debate with an anti-establishment declaration.

Rubio's Stump Names a New Opponent: Bernie Sanders

Feb 4, 2016

GOP Presidential hopeful Marco Rubio’s pretty much stuck to the same stump speech for months— a focus on America’s God given rights, the threats posed by ISIS, and, a promise to repeal all of President Obama’s executive actions.

He makes the case that he’s the most electable Republican running, referencing Hillary Clinton through the whole speech.

But since Iowa, Rubio’s added one more character to his speech, a guy whose photo made it into the gallery up on the wall here in the large conference room here at St. Anselm: Bernie Sanders.

AP Photo/John Locher

New Hampshire voters will get one last chance to hear from the two Democratic presidential candidates Thursday night before heading to the polls for next week’s primary.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders will square off at a debate at the University of New Hampshire.

Boston Globe political reporter James Pindell joined NHPR's Morning Edition to talk about the Democratic race.

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