Chris Jensen for NHPR

The holidays are the time when beloved, old Christmas decorations and some memories are dusted off...

And, at a tiny post office in the North Country an old piece of equipment is turned on again for the people who want their Christmas cards marked as coming from the little town of  Bethlehem.

That equipment is an old Pitney-Bowes stamp cancelling machine, says Brian Thompson, the post master.

The state of New Hampshire has approved an expansion to a landfill in the town of Bethlehem.

The Caledonian Record reports the application by North Country Environmental Services was approved with 17 conditions last week by the state Department of Environmental Services.

In this expansion, 8 acres would be added to the current 38-acre landfill and its lifespan would be extended by five to 10 years.

Residents have a 30-day window to appeal the DES approval.

The final demolition is underway for a 133-year-old building in Bethlehem, New Hampshire, that collapsed after heavy rain last fall.

The Main Street building, which has been called the Summit Building or the Cruft Block, housed a post office, jail, library, ballroom, general store, pizza parlor, and newspaper offices, among other businesses, throughout the years. The five-story building has been vacant in recent years.

A 133-year-old building in Bethlehem is headed for demolition after heavy rain collapsed part of it last fall.

Saturday night it was the third annual Christmas in Bethlehem celebration in the North Country.

NHPR’s Chris Jensen sent this postcard:

Saturday was the second birthday of the Art Walk in Bethlehem and up and down Main Street dozens of artists from the region gathered to show, discuss, demonstrate and sell their art.

“The art walk is a celebration of creativity,” said Katherine Ferrier, who worked with Angel Larcom and other volunteers to organize it. “This area is rich with artists.”

At the gazebo local groups took turns providing mini concerts while locals and tourists lounged on the grass.

Voters headed to town meetings Tuesday in the North Country will find some unusual issues including creating a community ski slope, challenging the rights of corporations as people, abolishing a police department and excluding “formula stores and fast-food restaurants.”

* In Bethlehem voters are considering two articles aimed at preventing “formula retail and formula fast food restaurants” from locating in the center of town.

In Grafton District 1 Democrat challenger Linda Massimilla is guaranteed one of the two seats, according to final totals compiled by the Associated Press.

But it's unclear whether the second seat will go to incumbent Republican Lyle Bulis or Republican Ralph Doolan.

Massimilla had 2,263 votes.

Meanwhile Bulis had 1,667 - only two votes more than Doolan. It wasn't clear whether Doolan will seek a recount.

The district includes Littleton and Bethlehem and was redrawn this year.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

With most of the voting day over some North Country election officials are figuring it won’t take long to count votes tonight.

NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

John Miller, the deputy moderator for the town of Bethlehem, says it has been a typical primary election for local candidates.

“The turnout so far has been very, very low.”

By about 4:30 roughly 250 of the 1600 or so registered voters in this Northern Grafton town had voted, Miller said.

He figured there were slightly more Republicans than Democrats voting.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Traffic through the North Country on Labor Day was slowed a bit in one town by huge metal monsters.

NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

The movie monsters and Leonardo Da Vinci’s horse stopped a lot of traffic on Route 302 in Bethlehem over the holiday.

The statues are in front of a shop where Gerry Ramback plans to sell arts and crafts from the region – as well as Asia.

They were created by welding, mixing and matching thousands of auto and motorcycle parts.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Gov. Lynch has signed a bill to establish a fire training site in Bethlehem.

It will allow a long-sought $550,000 training facility.

NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

Sound of fire departments being dispatched for fire in Bethlehem…

For decades North Country fire fighters rushing to fires such this one last month first had to go to Concord for training and practice.

And for years fire chiefs have dreamed of having a training facility above the notches, says Jack Anderson, the fire chief in Bethlehem.

Warm weather over the weekend and climbing a 4,000 footer in the North Country was a bad combination for a Penacook man.

 NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

Early Sunday afternoon hiking companions of a 51-year-old man used a cell phone to call for help.

Lt. James Kneeland of Fish and Game said the problem was apparently heat related.

“Dehydration, heat stroke. Something along those lines to the point where he was losing, in and out of consciousness.”