Boating

A group of New Hampshire residents and sportsmen’s organizations is suing the Department of Environmental Services over boat access on Lake Sunapee.

The suit comes after Gov. Chris Sununu pulled the plug earlier this year on a decades-long plan for boat access at what’s known as the Wild Goose site on the lake’s southern shore. He did so by choosing to not renew a wetlands permit for the site.

The complaint, filed in Sullivan County Superior Court, argues that DES, not the governor, has the authority to decide on that permit.

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Commission is expressing "serious disagreement" with Governor Chris Sununu's decision to halt long-standing plans for a public boat-access site on Lake Sunapee. 

Plans for the site on the lake’s southwestern shore have been in the works for over two decades. In July, Sununu pulled the plug, saying "Enough is enough," and citing environmental and traffic concerns from nearby residents.

Courtesy of NH Lakes Association

A new law is in effect this year that could affect anyone putting a boat into New Hampshire’s waters this summer.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Commercial fishermen in Northern New England face their fair share of challenges. Along with declining fish stocks and tight catch regulations, the occupation also remains one of the most dangerous in the country.

With that ever-present risk in mind, dozens of fishermen turned out in New Castle, New Hampshire recently for a day-long safety training exercise.

Ocean.
Gail Frederick via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/4n2ahJ

  While air temperatures having been warming across New England, the Coast Guard says water temperatures remain cold and potentially dangerous. 

Karen Kardoza via Flickr CC

With the forecast calling for sunny skies, and millions of out-of-state visitors expected, this Labor Day weekend should be a busy one on New Hampshire's lakes.

Sean Hurley

New Hampshire’s two model sailboat clubs got together in Wolfeboro for a regatta known as the Sasquatch Footy.

Bob Rice sits on a bench overlooking the wind scratched surface of Wolfeboro's Back Bay Harbor.  He watches the remote control sailboats tack back and forth and pivot around the floating white marks.  

Oh I think it's dandy.  You get boats of this size and more people can play with them.

Karen Cardoza via Flickr CC

As summer approaches, boaters who enjoy spending time on Lake Winnipesaukee have their eyes focused on two things: the weather and the lake level.

Most lakes have natural high and low seasonal water points caused by the whims of nature. But the state’s largest lakes are too important to New Hampshire’s tourism economy to be left to chance.