Books

The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed November 30, 2011

One Nation Under AARP

What began a half century ago as an organization for insurance purposes has grown into much more.  The AARP has become an influential lobbying group with forty million members.   We’ll talk with the author of a new book which examines this and the AARP’s role in current debates over Medicare and Social Security.  

  • Frederick Lynch - An Associate Professor of  Government at Claremont McKenna College, and author of Invisible Victims and the Diversity Machine

 

Read more
Word of Mouth - Segment
12:43 pm
Tue November 29, 2011

He's a Fighter, Not Just a Writer

(Photo courtesy Matt Polly)

Who doesn’t love an underdog? A Rocky in the ring? With the audience for boxing eroding, the new ring is an octagonal cage. In popularity and profits, mixed martial arts, or MMA, has knocked out boxing in the past decade.  The Ultimate Fighting Championship, MMA’s flagship event, was sold for two million dollars in 2001. Today, it’s worth an estimated one billion. Our guest today is a definitive UFC underdog.  He’s a writer who dove George Plimpton-style into the grueling world of MMA and landed in the octagon. 

Read more
Word of Mouth
11:46 am
Mon November 28, 2011

Writers on a New England Stage: Stephen King

Author Stephen King has written more than 50 worldwide best-sellers. More than 80 feature and television film adaptations have extended King’s reach far beyond the bestsellers list, earning him the title of “Master of Horror,” and establishing him as one of the most influential writers of our age.

Read more
Word of Mouth - Segment
3:59 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Homies and Hermanos

Photo by Piet den Blanken, courtesy of Oxford University Press

Why would a gun-wielding, tattoo-bearing "homie" trade in la vida loca for a Bible and the buttoned-down lifestyle of an evangelical hermano (brother in Christ)? To answer this question, Robert Brenneman interviewed sixty-three former gang members from the "Northern Triangle" of Central America--Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras--most of whom left their gang for evangelicalism.

Read more
Word of Mouth - Segment
3:47 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Our Oddest Clauses

It's America, yo
(Photo by Steven Roerman via Flickr Creative Commons)

Jay Wexler's new book and blog focus on the odd Constitutional clauses we should, maybe, focus on a little less...and those we should, perhaps, turn into awesome t-shirts.

Read more
The Exchange
8:47 am
Fri November 11, 2011

Through Veteran's Eyes (rebroadcast)

Erik Eisele NHPR

As of early 2010, more than 2 million US troops have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Larry Minear, a researcher on international and internal armed conflicts, has spent a lot of time talking to more than 175 of these veterans, many of whom came from New Hampshire and Vermont. He talked to them about what motivated them to go to war, what they did once they went over, and how they rejoined society upon their return.

Read more
13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:03 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Is Time An Illusion? From The Buddha To Brian Greene

Can time be stopped, captured or even known? Does it exist, or is it all just an illusion?
Karim Sahib AFP/Getty Images

Is time real, or is change just a kind of optical illusion resting on a deeper unchanging reality?

As finite creatures, with death hovering just out of our sight, the true nature of time haunts all our endeavors. Tomorrow, physicist Brian Greene tackles time's illusion in his Fabric of Reality PBS series. Science, however, is just one way we ask about the reality of time.

Read more
Word of Mouth
2:37 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

As The Publishing World Turns...

Zimpenfish Flickr Creative Commons

Amazon is back in the business of getting books on print - only now, they're hopping the middle man. Jason Boog, Editor of the publishing website Galley Cat, explains.

Links:

Word of Mouth
2:17 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Genetic Genocide: GMO Mosquitoes

Karl-Ludwig Poggeman Flickr Creative Commons

Editor for Scientific American Michael Moyer explains how genetically-modified mosquitoes could stop the spread of Dengue Fever; unless uncomfortable corporate practices don't cause a GMO backlash first.

Links:

Word of Mouth
2:05 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Deaf Jam Poetry - the signs of spoken word

Kaveh Khodjasteh Flickr Creative Commons

Deaf Israeli slam-poet Aneta Brodski collaborates with Palestinian interpreter Veronica Staehle, uniting culture and language through art.

Links:

The Exchange
12:00 am
Tue November 1, 2011

Republic, Lost

"Why have fundamentally good people, with good intentions, allowed our democracy to be co-opted by outside interests?", asks Harvard professor, Lawrence Lessig. His new book "Republic, Lost" explores how he says money has corrupted American politics.  Lessig blames special interests and campaign finance rules to the fact that U.S citizens trust government less than ever. He also  suggests  a widespread mobilization and new Constitution Convention to regain control over what he says is a 'corrupted but redeemable representational system. 

Guest

Read more
NH News
8:46 am
Fri October 28, 2011

Crime Fiction the Granite State Way

Rick Broussard, Editor of Volume 2 in the New Hampshire Pulp Fiction Series, explains why New Hampshire is such a good background for a mystery anthology.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Jobs' Biography: Thoughts On Life, Death And Apple

Walter Isaacson's biography of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was published Monday, less than three weeks after Job's death on Oct. 5.

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 3:35 pm

When Steve Jobs was 6 years old, his young next door neighbor found out he was adopted. "That means your parents abandoned you and didn't want you," she told him.

Jobs ran into his home, where his adoptive parents reassured him that he was theirs and that they wanted him.

Read more
11 for '11
12:00 am
Tue October 4, 2011

11 for '11: Stephen Pinker

This month’s installment of our 11 for '11 series of big picture conversations on the issues of our times. Today, we talk with Harvard experimental psychologist Stephen Pinker about his new book, Better Angels of Our Nature, about the history of violence, and why it's declined

Links:

Word of Mouth
11:01 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Outcasts United

In 2009, we spoke with new York Times reporter Warren St. John about his book Outcasts United– which tells the story of the Fugees soccer team and the growth of community around them.  The book is currently being featured in the Concord Reads program at the Concord Public Library.  Concord is a city that has experienced its own influx of refugees from war torn countries in recent years.  Here is what Warren had to say about the Fugees' inspiring story.

Links:

Pages