Books

fiell.com / Fiell Publishing

With over twenty years of experience on the editorial side of design publishing, Charlotte and Peter Fiell are pioneers in bringing great design to the masses with big, beautiful glossy books. Their first book together, “ Modern Design Classics Since 1945 ”, was published twenty-two years ago and introduced mid-century modern furniture to a new generation of design lovers and novices. They are also the former editors-in-chief for the best-selling design imprint Taschen . Three years ago the design power couple established their own line of art and design books— Goodman Fiell —which publishes titles written by the couple in addition to books written by experts across a wide range of disciplines; from art and architecture to natural history and popular culture .

By looking at corporate and financial structures from an historical perspective, Smith contends that over four decades our middle class has been dismantled and that we have become two Americas. GUEST: Hedrick Smith - author, prize-winning investigative reporter and documentary producer. Among the books that Smith has written are The Power Game: How Washington Works and Rethinking America . *Hedrick Smith will be appearing at Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord on Tuesday, October 22nd at 7.

According to this map posted on BusinessInsider.com, John Irving's Hotel New Hampshire is the most famous book set in New Hampshire. But what about Peyton Place ? A Separate Peace? Or Irving's other classic, A Prayer For Owen Meany? We'd love to know what you think should hold the title... leave us a note on Facebook with your pick.

In this new approach to the Civil War, Wineapple provides the reader with a sense of the passions and tragedies of the era, including character studies of the vibrant and flawed personalities behind the scenes. GUEST: Brenda Wineapple teaches literature at both New Yorks New School University and Columbia University. Wineapple is also professor of modern literary and historical studies at Union College. Her previous book is White Heat: the Friendship of Emily Dickinson and Thomas Wentworth...

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We turn now to that exemplary literary magazine, Playboy. Hugh Hefner’s magazine has always been about the centerfold and male fantasy and an air-brushed version of female sexuality…but it's also a great read. Really. In 2005, writer Amy Grace Loyd was hired to revive Playboy’s traditions of stories from the likes of Hunter S. Thompson and short fiction from Margaret Atwood, or that scandalous interview with Presidential candidate Jimmy Carter. Amy was Playboy’s Fiction and Literary Editor for seven years, and she recently wrote in Salon about some of the ribbing she took for a job she loved. She also recently published her first novel, called “The Affairs of Others."

Revulsion kept early humans from eating spoiled meat, or snuggling up to people covered with oozing sores. Today, some cultures prize cheeses writhing with maggots, or drink liquor made from fermented saliva. This is not a trick to get you to eeewww but a way to evoke the visceral nature of disgust, which as Rachel Herz found, is powerful enough to convict suspects, incite genocide, and make us writhe and wretch within seconds. Rachel is an instructor at Brown University and expert on the psychology of smell and emotion and the author of Thats Disgusting: Unraveling the Mysteries of Repulsion .

via The Poetry Foundation

The Biblical story of Abraham and Isaac is horrifying, unforgettable and open to interpretation. Faithful Jews, Christians and Muslims regard Gods demand that Abraham sacrifice his beloved son as a lesson about the demands of faith, the rewards for obedience, or for some, evidence of Gods cruelty. Others see the essence of the story not in the command not to sacrifice, but the command to stop. The parable is alluded to throughout The Exchange by Sophie Cabot Black , one of the poems about the exchange of love and money and sex and time which anchors her third collection of poems. Black is among the many writers who will be sharing her work with audiences at the Brattleboro Literary Festival this weekend.

In his book, My Heart is an Idiot , Davy Rothbart chronicles his shocking and sometimes disturbing real life stories about traveling around America, looking for love, and meeting strangers who take strange to a whole new level. Hes also the creator of Found Magazine and a regular contributor to This American Life . We spoke to Davy Rothbart last year, when My Heart is an Idiot was first published. Davy will be making a swing through New England this fall , and will visit Portsmouth, New...

Image courtesy Smith College

This year marks the 50th anniversary of poet Sylvia Plath’s death by suicide, the singular lens through which many readers and academics have viewed her life, writing, and marriage. Now, a new generation is re-discovering Plath from a fresh perspective, one not colored by her sad and macabre death. Liesl Schillinger is a New York based arts writer – she recently wrote about the 21 st Century resurrection and rebranding of Sylvia Plath, and speaks with us about how writers like Lena Dunham are...

howardmansfield.com

Mansfield has spent his literary life writing stories that connect people to the land where they live. In his latest book, he explores the idea of ones dwelling from mansions to condos to sheds and how, as he says, they succeed or fail to shelter usbody and soul. GUEST: Howard Mansfield: Noted New Hampshire author, whose latest book is Dwelling In Possibility. *Howard will be speaking and reading from his book this Saturday at the Toadstool Bookshop in Peterborough at 11:00 AM. Other times...

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When was the last time you read a book? Not for work, not a kid’s bedtime story, but a real honest to goodness book , just for the pleasure of reading? If you sheepishly answered, "more than a year ago," you’re not alone. A recent survey puts the number of Americans who have failed to crack a spine in more than a year at one in four. While new technological distractions have certainly cut into our reading time, our next guest would also like to blame the Sisyphean task of merely trying to choose a book that’s worthy of reading. His solution? Authors should take a break from writing to give readers a chance to catch up. Colin Robinson is a co-founder of the New York based independent publisher OR .

There’s not a ton to look at in Los Alamos, New Mexico these days, but one of the most terrifying and iconic series of pictures in the history of the human race were once taken there, a little over 65 years ago, when a group of pioneer scientists photographed the world’s first atomic bomb test. They captured a speck of light, that turned into a snow-globe burning hotter than the surface of the sun, that turned into a mushroom cloud, now a universal symbol of epic destruction. Jonathan Fetter-Vorm is co-founder of T wo Fine Chaps , a graphic imprint dedicated to adapting and illustrating classic works of literature and natural science… he’s also the author and illustrator of Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb.

This month All Things Considered has been talking with authors who write in or about New Hampshire. We conclude the series with D.M. Cataneo . His new novel Eggplant Alley tells the story of Nicky Martini, a 13 year old growing up in a run-down New York City neighborhood during the turbulent year of 1970. D.M. Cataneo talks about the book with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson.

Courtesy JoyceMaynard.com

Say the name "Joyce Maynard" and you’re likely to get some pretty visceral reactions…from those who’ve admired her career since her time as a reporter for the New York Times and her later syndicated column “Domestic Affairs,” and from her detractors…those who are critical of her relentless self-examination and her revelations about her relationship with J.D. Salinger. Salinger was living as a recluse in Cornish, New Hampshire when he began exchanging letters with Maynard after reading an article she wrote as a freshman at Yale. She dropped out of college and moved in with Salinger. She was eighteen…Salinger was 53.

John Irving

Aug 20, 2013
Kevin Flynn for NHPR

From the youth spent at Philips Exeter Academy that pervades his body of work, through his studies with Kurt Vonnegut at the prestigious Iowa Writers Workshop – known for producing authors the like of Pulitzer winners John Cheever and Philip Roth - John Winslow Irving has emerged as a true literary heavyweight, distinctly American of voice, and one of the most influential cultural exports to come out of New Hampshire. A master of the multivalent, many-layered “story-within-a-story,” Irving...

This month All Things Considered has been been talking with authors who write in or about New Hampshire. Today’s guest writes in the Granite State, but her book is definitely not set here. It’s a dark fantasy novel set in an alternate version of 14 th century England, with sorcery, battles, and plenty of blood. It’s called Elisha Barber , and the author is E.C. Ambrose , who joins host Brady Carlson in the studio to talk about the book.

Building A Family, One Mountain Climb At A Time

Aug 12, 2013

In 2011, author Dan Szczesny and his wife unexpectedly became caretakers to two nine-year-olds. One of them, a girl named Janelle, joins Dan on a quest to hike the New Hampshire mountains known as the “52 with a view.” That quest is the basis for Dan’s book The Adventures of Buffalo and Tough Cookie . As part of our August series of conversations with authors who write in or about New Hampshire, Dan and Janelle talk with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about what they learned about...

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Tom Holbrook is the co-owner and manager of the independent RiverRun Bookstore in Portsmouth and one of our partners for the writers on a New England Stage series. Tom recently sent out an email saying “why I’m not going to complain about Amazon anymore” to the more than 2500 members of RiverRun’s e-mail list. Word of Mouth Senior Producer Rebecca Lavoie tracked Tom down to find out what was behind it. We have a copy of Tom's email posted on our Facebook page, Word of Mouth Radio.

via ofdiceandmen.com

Recounting his relationship with Dungeons and Dragons , David Ewalt writes, “I don’t know if I played D&D because other kids my age thought I was a nerd, or if they thought I was a nerd because I played D&D.” The progenitor of many of today’s role-playing games has gained a reputation for attracting social outcasts and misfits and as a gateway for teenage boys to consider Satan and suicide. Like millions of kids who played twenty-side die in basements and game rooms across the country, Ewalt grew up…and had less time for a game that could suck up the idle hours of youth. He’s among those picking up the old dice bag for a D&D revival. David Ewalt is now an editor for Forbes , and author of the new book Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons and Dragons and the People Who Play It . It hits stores August 20 th .

This month on All Things Considered we’re looking at authors who write in or around New Hampshire. We start with a series of detective novels set in New Hampshire against a backdrop of a coming apocalypse. In the Edgar Award-winning first book, The Last Policeman , author Ben H Winters introduced us to a young detective in Concord, Hank Palace, trying to solve a murder while the world braces for collision with a massive asteroid . The second book in the series has just been released. It’s...

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Children’s books are delightful, colorful, and whimsical ways to introduce children to reading. Although parents may find it a wee bit annoying to repeat the same stories night after night, reading to kids is crucial to healthy childhood development and helps form their vision of a world outside of their own. A study released last year found that children’s books are woefully under-representative of cultural diversity . Jason Boog is editor of the publishing website GalleyCat – he’s working on a book about reading to kids, and has been keeping an eye on content for kids.

Harper Collins

Nearly three years have passed since Long Island police uncovered the bodies of four dead girls along their local ocean parkway. Following the discovery, authorities uncovered commonalities among the deceased that included internet prostitution and a poor, working class socio-economic background. These revelations, coupled with a fifth girl who disappeared nearby under similar circumstances, resulted in the pursuit of a faceless serial killer who left behind very few leads.

Harper Collins Publishers

We spoke with author Robert Kolker about the unsolved case, dubbed the Long Island Serial Killer by the press and public. Here's an abbreviated version of the timeline in Lost Girls of the events surrounding the ongoing investigation. The full story and timeline is discussed in Lost Girls: An Unsolved American Mystery. April 20, 1996: Two female legs, wrapped in a plastic bag, are discovered on Fire Island west of Davis Park Beach.

100% Taylor Quimby

The success of The Hunger Games and the Divergent series opened the floodgates for young adult novels set in a dystopian future. Readers are gobbling up dark stories set in bleak landscapes where the authorities can’t be trusted and young protagonists rebel against a world built to subdue them. And of course, there is room for romance to rise from the ashes. Margaret Bristol is an editor at Bookish where she wrote the article, “What I Learned About Getting Married From Dystopian YA.” A dedicated fan of the genre, she’s here to discuss the sometimes valuable, sometimes hyperbolic messages people can glean from the dark world of dystopian fiction.

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Last week, author J.K. Rowling of H arry Potter fame was uncovered as true author behind The Cuckoo’s Calling, a mystery novel written under the pen-name Robert Galbraith. Signed first editions of the book are now selling for over six thousand dollars, a testament to the value of a name. The reporters at the Sunday Times who broke the Rowling story consulted several academics whose methods of determining authorship relied heavily on software they had developed for that very purpose. Ben...

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Our favorite content of the week, wrapped up in one audio-licious program. This week, author Chuck Klosterman defines villainy, the Cronut craze catches a Harvard researcher's eye, head transplants are given an examination, robots roll into vinyards, and a pair of hard-partying vegetarians share their take on potato salad (spoiler alert: it's got Doritos in it!)

“Parties don’t throw themselves….” That’s the opening sentiment of Lust for Leaf, a new cookbook and party guide that turns vegetarian fare on its pony-tailed head. The book is the brainchild of the pair of LA-based food bloggers behind Hot Knives, Alex Brown and Evan George . These guys know how to cook, how to throw a great party, how to pair food with music , and how to make even the most stalwart meat-lover embrace their veggie-lovin' lifestyle. Of course, it could have something to do...

via indiebound.org

It’s easy to tell who's the villain in an old western: The good guy wears a white hat, the bad guy wears black. Real life villains don’t follow that code. Nor are they likely to conspicuously twirl their moustaches like Snidely Whiplash awaiting the oncoming train. Sure Hitler was evil…but what is the nature of villainy? Bill Clinton? Joe Frazier? And the Sharon Stone character in Basic Instinct attract haters…but does that make them wicked? What is the nature of villainy? Why does Taylor Swift inspire cultish adoration, while Wilt Chamberlin is loathed? And why is our culture so absorbed with anti-heroes, anyway. Chuck Klosterman writes about sports and popular culture and is The New York Times ethicist. He explores the nature of badness --- in the bad way -- in a new collection of essays called I Wear The Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined) .

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Our sunniest content of the week, all in one smart and snazzy hour. This week, misogyny online, the return of legal internet poker, an app that proves you're on a public beach, surprising summer reads, and a photographer's documentation of vanishing highway rest stops.

Joe Nye And The Relevance Of The Presidency

Jul 10, 2013

In his new book, Harvard University President Joseph Nye analyzes the role of presidential leadership during the rise of American global influence from Theodore Roosevelt - the first president to assert this country’s power on the world stage - to Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, who presided over the end of the Cold War during a time when American power reached its zenith. Guest Joseph S. Nye, Jr. - University Distinguished Service Professor and former Dean of the Kennedy School of...

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