Books

Fake Science 101

Aug 30, 2012
Horia Varlan via Flickr Creative Commons

Science is one of those topics it seems you either get or you don’t. If you fall in the latter category, you might have wished at some point – maybe during a high school physics test – that you could just make up the answers and get credit for being clever.   Well, our next guest makes his living doing exactly that. Phil Edwards is the author behind the Fake Science blog, and a new sort of textbook called Fake Science 101.

Groove Interrupted

Aug 30, 2012
New Orleans Lady via Flickr Creative Commons

As Hurricane Isaac continues to creep over the Gulf Coast and cause massive flooding, we can’t help but think of Katrina, and the devastation that storm left in her wake. Images this week of weary Louisiana residents make it difficult to remember the hopeful, yet not always easy rebirth of New Orleans after that storm.

Chris Matthews is best known for his opinionated and combative style on his MSNBC program, "Hardball with Chris Matthews."

What's lesser known is that he's a former print journalist, was a long-time aide to Tip O'Neill, and that he grew up in an Irish Catholic family...of Republicans. All this played no small part in sewing the seeds of his admiration for a man he'd later write two books about, John F. Kennedy.

Anders V/ Flickrs Creative Commons

We talk with Pulitzer Prize winning author Edward Humes about his new book, Garbology: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash. Americans are at the top of the heap for producing waste: over 100 tons per person in a lifetime.

Humes explores why we make so much garbage, the environmental and economic impact of trash…and why he believes this is a problem ordinary people can fix.

The Science of Sleep

Aug 16, 2012

It take up more time in our lives than almost any other activity, yet science still knows very little about sleep or how it affects us.

chrisinplymouth via Flickr Creative Commons

Part 1:

The Blackout Boom

David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

Chris Cleave is a columnist for the UK's Guardian newspaper and author of Incendiary and Little Bee.

Photo Credit Mr.T in DC, Via Flickr Creative Commons

Have you ever picked a paperback from a used bookstore or library shelf, and seen the words “uncorrected proof: not for sale” on the cover?  If so, chances are you were looking at an advanced readers copy, or “arc” – an early draft of a book that publishers sent out to reviewers, bloggers, and yes, radio stations in hopes of attracting media coverage.  The thing is, arcs don’t disappear after review, and not every author appreciates unedited version of works floating about in literary circles…we wanted to pull back the curtain on this one small part of the publishing industry – so we called

Next week the band Level3 will perform at the Lane Memorial Library in Hampton - despite the fact that Level3 is a fictional band.

Confused yet? Not to worry – it’s all part of a new young adult novel called Reunited, in which three young women drive from New England to Texas to see the one-night-only reunion concert of their once-favorite band, Level 3.

"Miss Fuller"

Jul 19, 2012
Photo Credit sdixclifford, via Flickr Creative Commons

Produced with Emma Ruddock

The Best Books Hot off Indie Presses

Jul 17, 2012
Photo by Henry via Flickr Creative Commons

Back-to-school season isn’t for another month-and-a-half, so there’s still plenty of time to knock another novel or two off your summer reading list.  For true bookworms with stored-vacation time and quiet spot to spend it, we’ve got a few belated small-press summer suggestions that might have slipped your radar. 

With us is Michele Filgate—freelance writer, critic, and independent bookseller at community bookstore in Brooklyn.  Here are her picks:

GLACIERS by Alexis M Smith

David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

Produced with Emma Ruddock

Joan Didion, one of America’s most admired writers, recorded live at the music hall in Portsmouth. 

Slouching Towards Bethlehem, her 1968 collection of non-fiction established Didion as a brilliant observer and a powerful voice in the genre that would become  “new journalism.” 

Yesterday, in a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court decided to uphold most of President Obama's signature health care law.  The decision came with mixed reactions in New Hampshire. Some applauded the ruling while others plotted political revenge. Both Democrats and Republicans have called it a political 'leg up' for their hopes in November, but only time will tell who is right?  Today we'll look at this decision, how it will affect Granite Staters and how it may play out politically both nationally and here in New Hampshire.

Guests

Brady Carlson, NHPR

It’s summer camp season – these days kids can spend a week on almost any activity they like, from sports and the outdoors to computers and robotics. Since the late 1960’s, kids who love music have been heading to Bennington, Vermont, which is home to a piano camp known as Summer Sonatina.

Summer Books 2012!

Jun 22, 2012

Heavy hitters from Richard Ford to Dave Eggers to John Irving have new offerings. There are books on Bruce Springsteen, James Joyce and the Obamas and as the weather warms, you may want to read the steamy pages of Fifty shades of Gray. We’ll look at the books you’ll want to take with you to the beach the mountains or just as your lounging in your backyard for the summer of 2012 .

Guests

Reverse Innovation

Jun 21, 2012

A new book by a Dartmouth professor explores the changing world of advances in technology, medicine, and marketing and the greater role that developing nations are playing.  More and more, innovations are occurring in poorer countries, then exported to wealthy nations, turning traditional patterns on their head.  We’ll hear some examples, and why our guest says this could benefit everyone.  

Guest

(Photo by Lester Public Library via Flickr Creative Commons)

Summer time is book season, with seemingly every media outlet weighing in with lists of recommended beach reads. Audiobooks don’t get nearly as much play, though they are a staple for many, whether as the soundtrack to a road trips, a daily commute, or even an alternative to listening to the radio at home.

Fifty Shades of NHPR

Jun 18, 2012
(Photo by Rebecca Lavoie)

While we were prepping for today's segment on audio books, we couldn’t help but wonder about whether we could pass as audio book producers…perhaps even elevating a book of dubious quality by getting just the right people to read it. So, we took dramatic  stab at an excerpt from the hottest book around, Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L.

Part 1: Is "Liking" Free Speech?/The Legacy of Limmer

Twilight of the Elites

Jun 12, 2012

A new book by liberal commentator Chris Hayes examines the widespread institutional failures over the last ten years…from government to Wall Street to the Catholic Church to major league baseball.  Hayes says this “lost decade” has led the public to distrust anyone in authority…and he points blame at a fundamental cherished  American ideal:  the meritocracy.

 

J.D. Salinger famously refused to sell the film rights to The Catcher in the Rye, saying it was "unactable." It's true the subtleties of such great novels can get lost in translation. But I thought I'd take a look at three of my favorite novels that have never made it to the multiplex in wide release. Each of these will transport you to another time and another place.

Lizzie Skurnick writes the "That Should Be a Word" column for the New York Times Magazine.

England has always reveled in its drawing-room dramas, from Jane Austen's social minefields to E.M. Forster's Howards End to Upstairs, Downstairs — and yes, the blockbuster Downton Abbey.

(Photo by Corey Garland, Garland Photography)

If If fiction writers can learn from police reports, true crime writers have the tricky task of transforming those reports into prose. Word of Mouth Senior Producer Rebecca Lavoie is also a true crime author. She and her husband Kevin Flynn have written and published two books, in the genre.

David J. Murray, www.cleareyephoto.com

International bestselling author Dan Brown talks about science, religion, and life after the Da Vinci Code at a benefit performance for Writers on a New England Stage, live from the Music Hall in Portsmouth. Brown’s novels, and the films based on them, have been banned by the Catholic church, inspired college courses, and have renewed dialogue about the interplay between science and religion. Brown, the son of a mathemeticiaa and a church organist, talks about his lifelong inquiry into life’s mysteries. 

Recently CNET reported that the FBI had been lobbying congress for a law that would require social networking companies and other web-based communication systems to make sure their systems are surveillance-compatible. FBI director Robert Mueller seemed to confirm that in an appearance last week before the senate judiciary committee.

For centuries, that transition between teen-hood and adulthood has been accompanied with a newfound independence, where young men and women leave the roost, go to college, buy a house and raise a family.  But according to author Katherine Newman, high unemployment rates, the rise of short-term employment, longer life expectancies and the high cost of living have forced many a young adult back home to live with mom and dad.  They are called 'Accordion Families' and depending on the culture, they're met with a variety of acceptance.  Today we look closer into this new phenomenon called Accord

Mike Doughty’s 2005 album Haughty Melodic was a breakthrough for the singer-songwriter…before going solo, Doughty had founded and fronted the 90’s band Soul Coughing…which he disbanded in 2000, much to the chagrin of die-hard fans. But  there was a reason beyond the typical story of egos and bad record deals for that band’s demise…one that Doughty hints at in haughty melodic’s biggest hit, "Looking at the World from the Bottom of a Well.”

Akash Kapur is the son of an Indian father and an American mother. In 2003, after working professionally in New York City for more than a decade, he decided to return to India. As he writes in his book, India Becoming: A Portrait of Life in Modern India, he arrived in a place he hardly recognized.

It's almost that time of year again, when a new crop of 20-something college graduates prepares to take those first steps into the working world.

In her new book, The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter — And How to Make the Most of Them Now, University of Virginia clinical psychologist Meg Jay argues that those first years of adulthood are the most important time in a young person's life.

Jay recently joined NPR's Rachel Martin to discuss why the 20s are such a crucial age for both college grads and non-college grads.

How much would you pay for a very rare book?

The British Library in London has just paid about $14 million to purchase Europe's oldest intact book, known as the St. Cuthbert Gospel. It's a copy of the Gospel of St. John, thought to have been produced in northeastern England sometime during the seventh century.

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