Boston Marathon

Updated at 3:42 p.m.

After listening to testimony from 63 witnesses and deliberating since Wednesday, a jury of seven women and five men in Boston gave convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev the death penalty.

There was no visible reaction from either Tsarnaev or his legal team.

The jury sentenced Tsarnaev to die on counts 4, 5, 9, 10, 14 and 15. Here is more detail about those counts:

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Update: Despite Monday's wet, dreary weather Randy Pierce hit his goal of breaking four hours, crossing the finish in 3 hours and 50 minutes. 

When 30,000 runners line up this morning in Boston, many will be running for some cause or some loved one, and that’s the case for Nashua runner Randy Pierce, but he's doing it with an extra challenge -- he's blind.

And with the record-breaking snowfall, subzero temperatures and icy conditions, training this winter without being able to see was no easy task.

Jane Flavell Collins/AP

A jury found admitted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty on all counts yesterday, including 17 making him eligible for the death penalty.

The bombings left three people dead and wounded more than 260 others.

Karen Brassard of Nashua was injured in the first blast near the finish line, along with her husband and daughter.

She was in the courtroom when the verdict was read and joins Morning Edition to share her reaction.

A jury in Boston has found 21-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty on all counts related to the 2013 bombings of the Boston Marathon. The twin bombings, carried out with his older brother, Tamerlan, killed three people and left 264 others wounded.

Brian Snyder/Reuters/Landov

The first four days of the trial of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokar Tsarnaev have been filled with emotional testimony from family members of those killed and survivors who suffered devastating injuries.

Nashua resident Karen Brassard is among those who have been watching in the courtroom.

She suffered serious injuries to her legs while watching the Marathon near the finish line. Her husband and daughter were also injured.

She’s been traveling to Boston as often as she can to be there for the trial.

Updated at 5:18 p.m. ET

Jurors in Boston heard more harrowing testimony today in the trial of Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the accused Boston Marathon bomber. Survivors, as well as police and first responders, recounted often-disturbing accounts of their suffering.

NPR's Tovia Smith, who was at the trial, called the testimony "excruciatingly graphic and grueling." Here's part of her reporting on today's All Things Considered:

NHPR / Keith Shields

Executive Producer of The Exchange Keith Checks in with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley about the scene at this morning's 118th running of the Boston Marathon.

"There are definitely more police here. I'm sure there's a lot more undercover police that I'm unaware of," Shields said. "We chartered a bus from my area of Boston. We got here. We have bags on our bus and there's no problems so far. We really haven't had anybody check our bus, nobody come on. It sort of feels kind of normal here today."

Amanda Burgess of Nashua is blogging for NPR about her experience of returning to the Boston Marathon this year.

She was stopped less than a mile from the finish line last year.

That's where her two children and several family members were standing. 

Thankfully, they were not injured, but it was two hours before she was able to get in touch with them.

Rick Ganley: You’ve been writing about your experience over the past several months for NPR. How did you get involved in that blog?

wallyg / Flickr Creative Commons

One year after the tragedy at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, we remember the many stories of heartbreak and of courage that abound at the time and have transpired since.

Police say a man taken into custody near the Boston Marathon finish line had a rice cooker in his backpack and is being charged with possession of a hoax device.

Police Superintendent Randall Halstead says the man was stopped Tuesday by an officer who saw him acting suspiciously. He says the man dropped the backpack.

Halstead says the man also faces charges of disturbing the peace and disorderly conduct.

Crowds are gathering in Boston today to mark the one year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings. Today on Word of Mouth, we remember the victims, the injured, the first responders, and all of those who offered help.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

New Hampshire police officers who pitched in after the Boston Marathon Bombings last year met in Manchester Tuesday with Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

Boston Marathon Bombings: Granite Staters Reflect

Apr 14, 2014
Carlos Silva / Flickr/CC

On April fifteenth, two bombs exploded close to the finish line, of one of the world’s most prestigious races. Many from New Hampshire were running, cheering, or working at the event.  We’re talking with a roundtable of Granite Staters about their memories and thoughts over the past year, and what’s changed.


Boston Magazine, Times Books, Hot Dog Emoji Coalition

Today on Word of Mouth, the Boston Marathon bombings happened a year ago this month, but questions about Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s possible involvement in a triple homicide remain. Investigative reporter Susan Zalkind discusses the complicated case, and whether police missed their chance to apprehend Tsarnaev long before the marathon bombs. Plus, between online hacking, stored search histories, social media settings, and malware,protecting one’s privacy has become more important, and more complicated than ever. So, how much is our anonymity worth? We'll ask  And finally, there are over 700 different Emojis out there, and plenty of interest groups asking for more. Why, for example, is there no hot dog Emoji? Turns out, the answer is surprisingly complicated.

vpickering via flickr Creative Commons

From the Newtown shootings to the Boston marathon bombings, the last year has seen no shortage of tragic acts of violence that have dominated news coverage. But one story appeared as no more than a blip on the national news radar: that of a neighborhood mother’s day parade in New Orleans, where shots were fired and 19 people were wounded. Two suspects were arrested late last week, but for days, the incident stood as the largest mass shooting in the United States with perpetrators still at large – so why weren’t we bombarded with media coverage? Our guest is David Dennis Jr., a journalist and New Orleans native who wrote about the issue for the UK Guardian.

Photo via Flickr Creative Commons

In the four weeks since the Boston Marathon bombings, the One Fund set up to collect donations for victims has raised more than twenty-eight million dollars. The decision on how that money gets distributed goes to Kenneth Feinberg, the so-called “great decider”. 

At public hearings held last week at the Boston Public Library, Feinberg stated that there is not enough money in the One Fund to satisfy everyone. Here to discuss how dollars get assigned to tragedies is Juliette Kayyem, national security and foreign policy columnist for the Boston Globe. She’s former assistant secretary for intergovernmental affairs at the department of homeland security.

jspad via flickr Creative Commons

With Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in custody, the relief many Bostonians felt at his capture turns to anger.  While prosecutors have only begun to build their case against the 19-year old marathon bombing suspect, the public has strong expectations of how Tsarnaev’s trial should proceed and how he should be punished.

Leon Neyfakh writes for the ideas section of the Boston Globe, he spoke to criminologists, legal scholars and academics who warn that the trial will likely fall short of the public’s wish for emotional closure, and justice.


The shock and horror of the Boston marathon explosions one week ago today gave way to an almost incomprehensible sequence of events leading to a dramatic day-long dragnet that shut a major American city and several surrounding neighborhoods down. Now, with one suspect dead and his younger brother in critical condition at a Boston hospital, citizens and media alike are grappling to fill in motivations and create narratives that we can understand.  Among the most combed-over questions is whether 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev somehow radicalized his popular, athletic, seemingly well-adjusted 19-year-old brother Dzhokhar.

New Hampshire residents have already started to react to the capture of one of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.

Fireworks could be heard in parts of Manchester on news of the capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the second suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing.

Tsarnaev was apprehended alive after a standoff with police Friday night in Watertown.

Reactions in the Queen City ranged from happiness over his capture to relief.

One Manchester man was elated the suspect didn’t escape justice:

hahatango via Flickr Creative Commons

From anticipated weather events to shocking acts of terrorism, many people now turn first to social media to react and interact during moments of crisis – this past Monday was no different.  Shortly after two explosions rocked Copley Square near the Boston Marathon’s finish line, the internet was flooded with graphic photos, video uploads from witnesses, and tools to help loved ones connect with runners and spectators at the race.  With the online element of disaster response now an essential part of how we view these events, we wanted to break down what worked and what didn’t.  Joining us is Brady Carlson, NHPR’s host of All Things Considered, and our in-house expert on all things internet.

wallyg / Flickr Creative Commons

Three hundred seventy-seven New Hampshire residents were competing in Boston today when two explosions erupted in the crowds near the finish line of the race. An untold number more were in Boston as spectators or volunteers.

Ronald and Karen Brassard of Epsom and their daughter were injured in the blast, but are going to be fine, according to a relative.

Yesterday, celebration turned to fear, concern and anguish for many Granite Staters who were running in the Boston Marathon, watching it, working it or just cheering on loved ones from afar. Several deadly explosions occurred  near the race's finish line creating pandemonium As of now 3 are dead, and about 140 are injured. Many frantically tried to search for loved ones to make sure they were safe.

There was hardly a single person who thought that Henri Charles Renaud would win the 13th running of the Boston Marathon in 1909.  He was just 19 years old, a son of French Canadian immigrants who worked in the Nashua mills. And is his great grandson, Brett Misenor says he had only started running seven months earlier.

His father urged him to run only about 2 weeks before the race. Henri had begun running the September before and won the first race he ever ran and he entered the Boston Marathon and ended up out running some of the world’s best Olympic runners.