Brain

Word of Mouth
1:52 pm
Tue December 16, 2014

12.16.14: The Best Of What's New & Hollywood's Pretty Little Secret

Gorilla brand clear repair tape.
Credit Via Popular Science / bestofwhatsnew.popsci.com

For the past 27 years the editors of Popular Science have identified products and technologies designed to change our world. On today’s show we’ll review some of 2014’s groundbreaking technology.

Then, we’ve come to accept retouched images on magazine covers and billboard ads, but now the practice has moved to movies and television. We’ll take a look at the latest advancement in digital-alteration: frame-by-frame beauty work.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Read more
The Exchange
9:00 am
Tue December 16, 2014

Adolescent Brain Development: Why Teens Make Bad Decisions, And How Parents Can Help

Credit Petra / Flickr/CC

It’s often said that adolescents are impulsive partly because their brains aren’t fully developed.  Now a new book adds fuel to the discussion, describing how the period of adolescence is a lot longer these days, from age ten to twenty-five. It also shows that the brain at this time is highly malleable, and much more easily influenced by both positive and negative experiences. 

This program was originally broadcast on November 3, 2014.

Read more
Word of Mouth
2:14 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Beethoven To Beyonce: Can Music Really Make Babies Smarter?

Credit Philippe Put via Flickr CC

For years, the fact that classical music helps little brains grow and develop has been common knowledge. It appears in books about raising kids, comes from other parents, and spurs sales of CDs with names like “Bach For Babies.” But is it actually solid advice? We spoke with Jayson Greene who wrote the article “Mozart Makes You Smarter…And Other Dubious Musical Theories." He says no, it isn’t.

Read more
Word of Mouth
2:07 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

7.21.14: Numeric Personalities, Tipping Tendencies and Botox for Depression

Credit Janet Ramsden via Flickr Creative Commons

Why is six scared of seven? Because seven, eight, nine. Jokes like this are only one example of the ways that we humans like to assign personality traits to the numbers that dictate our world. Today on Word of Mouth we explore this seemingly universal tendency to create emotional associations with numbers.  Then, is tipping culturally determined? Freakonomics investigates the nuances of tipping in the United States with the help of Cornell professor Michael Lynn. Plus, Botox is well known for freezing the faces of many a Hollywood starlet, but how about freezing out negative emotions? We hear from journalist Taffy Brodesser-Akner about how Botox is being used to treat depression.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Read more
The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon April 28, 2014

New Numbers & Research On Autism

Credit Aban Nesta / Flickr/CC

With new numbers from the Centers for Disease Control showing ever-increasing rates, researchers and advocates are considering the causes and ramifications. Meanwhile, a new study strengthens the argument that autism originates in the brain before birth. We’ll talk to a panel of New Hampshire experts on this disorder for the latest.

GUESTS: 

Read more
Word of Mouth
10:16 am
Mon January 28, 2013

The Doodle Revolution

In a world where doodling is often criticized as a means toward distraction, new studies have shown that sketching and doodling improve our comprehension and creative thinking. Sunni Brown argues that there is no such thing as a mindless drawing. Her movement, and forthcoming book, is called ‘The Doodle Revolution'. She joins us to set the record straight.

Read more
Word of Mouth
10:47 am
Mon January 14, 2013

Dystextia: A New Warning Sign

Here’s another sign that personal technology has penetrated nearly every part of our lives – Boston Globe Health Reporter and blogger Deborah Kotz recently wrote about a newly recognized medical phenomenon called “dystextia”


Read more
Word of Mouth
11:44 am
Wed August 29, 2012

The Science of Changing Your Mind

Peter O via Flickr Creative Commons

Ever wonder whether hard facts play a part in changing a person's mind? Turns out, not so much. Boing Boing's Maggie Koerth-Baker wrote about the real influences on choice for The New York Times Magazine.

NH News
10:48 am
Thu May 31, 2012

Shrinking Stomach, Changing Brain

Ethan Hein Flickr Creative Commons

Thanks to growing awareness of a national obesity epidemic, and the lowering of complication rates since its introduction in the 1960s, gastric bypass procedures have become an increasingly popular treatment option for the morbidly obese.  At least 200,000 people signed up last year in the U.S. alone. 

Read more
Word of Mouth
11:07 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Breaking Down the Brain

Scientists at the University of Illinois report that they have mapped the physical architecture of the brain with accuracy never before achieved. Their study, published in Brain: A Journal of Neurology is the largest, most comprehensive analysis so far of the brain structures vital to general intelligence –which depends on a remarkably circumscribed neural system – and to specific cognitive functions, like memory, self-control and recognizing speech. 

Get it?

Read more
Word of Mouth - Segment
8:04 am
Sat November 19, 2011

Word of Mouth for 11.19.2011 Part 4

Throughout the year, we’ve been featuring a series we call 11 for 11… conversations with innovative thinkers who challenge and provoke new ways of thinking about the issues of our time. Dr. Raymond Tallis is a former clinical neuroscientist turned author.

Read more