Business and Economy

NHPR Staff

An economist says New Hampshire state revenues are showing signs of leveling off.

Greg Bird of the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies says there's been a marked slowdown in the growth rates of four state taxes: business profits, business enterprise, meals and rentals and real estate transfers.

He says the other 15 revenue streams that feed the state's General and Education funds have remained static for the past 2 1/2 years.

Allegra Boverman, NHPR

The medical and biotechnology industries have grown in New Hampshire the past few years as companies continue to move and expand throughout the state.

Liisa Rajala is an associate editor for the New Hampshire Business Review.

She spoke with Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley about the future of bio and medical technology in the state, and how these industries have already made an impact on cities like Manchester.

Let's get a brief recap of what this growth of the Manchester area is looking like. It's been going on for years now.

Jim Cole / Associated Press

Ten years after a paper mill shut down in the village of Groveton, New Hampshire, a Vermont manufacturer has taken root and has 92 people at work.

Last year, NSA Industries of St. Johnsbury, a metal fabrication company, signed a long-term lease to rent 73,000 square feet (6781 sq. meters) of space on the site of the former Wausau Paper Mill in Groveton.

NSA Industries bought $3 million in equipment, and plans to double that. It also plans to hire about a dozen more people.

Michael Kooiman/wikimedia

Wages in New Hampshire fell in the fourth quarter of 2016, mirroring a trend seen across the country.

The average weekly paycheck in New Hampshire was $1,092, according to a report released Tuesday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That is down 4.1% from the previous year, the fourth largest decline in the country, and the largest dip in New England.

Cori Princell / NHPR

A company in Quebec announced Friday it’s opening up new operations in Berlin. Deflex produces fiberglass parts for Volvo buses and waterslides. The family-owned company says they’ve been looking for a way to make their products in America for American clients, and that they’ve been talking with New Hampshire officials about the move for over a year. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire’s economic output grew by 3 percent in 2016, the fourth highest rate in the country.

A new report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis shows the state’s finance and insurance sector helped fuel that performance, along with gains in retail and durable goods manufacturing.

In the fourth quarter of 2016, New Hampshire’s GDP kicked up at an annualized rate of 2.4 percent, a slowdown from the 4.6 percent growth seen in the third quarter of 2016.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A group of New Hampshire investors are launching the largest seed stage venture capital fund in state history.

Jaksmata/Wikimedia Commons

Earlier this week, the Trump Administration announced it will raise tariffs on lumber imported from Canada. The move comes in response to claims that the Canadian Government is providing unfair subsidies, which help undercut American producers. For home builders and saw mills in New Hampshire, the announcement is prompting very different reactions.

NH DRED

The Governor’s Conference on Travel and Tourism is hoping out-of-state experts can help in-state businesses attract more visitors.

Matthew Roth/Wikimedia Commons

New Hampshire continues to add high-paying tech jobs to the state’s economy--just not fast enough to meet the sector’s growing demand.

Carsey School of Public Policy

New research from the Carsey School of Public Policy at UNH shows the number of part-time employees who want to be working full-time has still not returned to pre-recession levels.

While the overall unemployment number is back to pre-recession levels, the percentage of workers who are part time but would like to be full-time remains higher than before the great recession.

Rebecca Glauber, author of the study, says the findings are an important asterisk to the overall unemployment rate.

Kandy Jaxx / Flickr

New Hampshire’s unemployment rate held steady at 2.7 percent for January, with modest job gains across a number of sectors.

Current Population Survey, © 2016 by Barry T. Hirsch and David A. Macpherson

New Hampshire lawmakers are again debating Right-to-Work laws, with bills currently moving through both the House and Senate. With Republican majorities in both chambers, and a newly-elected governor who favors Right-to-Work, the policy stands its best chance of passing in more than a decade.

But Right-to-Work isn’t exactly a kitchen-table kind of issue. If you aren’t in a union, or a large business owner, you may not know much about its history, what Right-to-Work does, or why it matters.

Sheryl Rich-Kern

By all accounts, commercial and residential construction is on the rebound in New Hampshire. But many general contractors say an aging workforce limits how much the market can grow.

Todd Bookman for NHPR

The term “apprentice” may conjure up thoughts of reality television and a certain President-elect, but actual apprenticeships--where workers learn skills on the job--are on the rise nationally. And in New Hampshire's health care industry, apprentices are being used as a way to fill a gap in the workforce.

Kandy Jaxx / Flickr

The state’s unemployment rate remains the lowest in the nation, dipping to 2.7% in November.

New data from the New Hampshire Department of Employment Security show the state lost 380 jobs last month, but that was offset by a shrinking labor force.

Fairpoint Communications To Be Sold

Dec 5, 2016
Ibew Fairpoint via Flickr CC

Fairpoint Communications, the largest telephone provider in Northern New England, is being sold. Illinois-based Consolidated Communications says it is buying Fairpoint for 1.5 billion dollars, marking a new chapter in the Fairpoint story, which has been marked by consumer complaints, union unrest and bankruptcy.

Last year, Fairpoint workers ended a year-long strike with a new contract that included worker concessions on health care and retirement benefits.

New unemployment figures came out Tuesday and at 2.8%, New Hampshire's rate remains the lowest in the nation. On paper, that may sound like a very good thing: nearly everyone who wants a job has one. But if you are an employer trying to fill a vacancy or a company trying to expand, these can be frustrating times.

New Hampshire’s job market continues to show signs of strength.

The state added 620 jobs last month, pushing the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate down a tenth of a point to 2.9 percent. Since the start of the year, gains have been made across most sectors of the economy, from leisure and hospitality to education and manufacturing.

The Manchester internet company Dyn has a new CEO. Colin Doherty is succeeding Dyn co-founder Jeremy Hitchcock. 

Dyn is an internet performance management company based in Manchester, with clients including Visa, Netflix and Twitter.

Sean Hurley

It hasn't been a great year for skiers or ski areas across the Granite State.  But it's not just the mountains that suffered from the lack of snow.

Jack Rodolico

Behind the counter at Fox Country Smokehouse stands the original smoker from 1969. It’s a wood closet – maybe six by four feet – with metal racks and a light bulb. The walls in there are deep brown, almost black. But they shine. You’d think they were shellacked, but the gloss comes from something else.

"It’s actually the creosote from the smoke," says Bill Annis, smokehouse manager. "This is the original door from day one. It just gets a little heavier every year from the smoke."

Via Glassdoor

The state attorney general says about 21,000 New Hampshire residents who are T-Mobile wireless customers may have had personal data exposed in the recent breach at the Experian credit reporting agency.

According to the attorney general's office, data was used by T-Mobile in credit checks of applicants for its services from Sept. 1, 2013 through Sept. 16, 2015.

It included names, addresses, birth dates, Social Security numbers and other identification.

NHPR Staff

With re-authorization of the Export-Import Bank stalled in Congress, several New Hampshire companies say they are feeling the impact.  New Hampshire’s two US Senators Kelly Ayotte and Jeanne Shaheen as well as 2nd District Congresswoman Ann McLane Kuster support re-authorization, while 1st District Congressman Frank Guinta has yet to take a position.

File photo

The Hannaford supermarket chain is settling a dispute with the federal Department of Labor with a promise to institute new worker protection standards at two distribution centers.

The labor department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Hannaford for failing to keep distribution centers in Schodack Landing, New York, and South Portland, Maine, free from hazards that can cause disorders of the muscular and skeletal systems. The citation came after inspections in 2013 and 2014.

Paul Goddin via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/rZZE1N

The city of Portsmouth has legalized the ride-sharing service Uber.

The Portsmouth Herald reports that the ordinance was passed along with an amendment to delay its implementation by 45 days.

Sheryl Rich-Kern for NHPR

In Nashua, construction workers are completing the nearly two-mile Broad Street Parkway, which connects the F.E. Everett Turnpike at exit 6 to Nashua’s Millyard district.

City officials are touting its potential to develop riverfront property, and breathe new life to Nashua’s downtown. All of this comes at a time when vacant storefronts dot Nashua’s Main Street and a coveted anchor store announced it was leaving by next year.


The New Hampshire chapter of the AFL-CIO is about to get a new president, the first since 1989.

Glenn Brackett, business agent of the IBEW Local 2320, takes over July 1, succeeding Mark MacKenzie after an election challenge was resolved.

In May, MacKenzie was re-elected at a state convention after ballots representing nearly 700 votes were ruled "spoiled;" they were marked with check marks instead of X's, as required by election rules.

Daniel Nguyen

The Anheuser-Busch plant in New Hampshire is planning for an addition to produce canned beer.

The Telegraph of Nashua reports the Merrimack Planning Board has approved construction of a 5,300-square-foot brewing facility and 50,000 square feet in warehouse and packaging buildings.

Canned beer is making a comeback, as new technologies such as polymer linings have allowed beer to be stored longer in cans without acquiring a metallic taste.

Flickr CC

The New Hampshire Attorney General's office has reached an agreement with a rug store owner who has been advertising a going out of business sale since last fall.

Attorney General Joseph Foster said the state entered into an agreement with Menashe Cohen, doing business as Epic Oriental Rugs of Hampton, to resolve allegations that he violated the state's Consumer Protection Act. Cohen published ads until April.

The act prohibits advertising such a sale that lasts for more than 60 days.

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