Business

Chris Jensen for NHPR

For 15 years the Cold Mountain Café in Bethlehem has been a fixture in the North Country.

But when one of its co-owners died, it looked like the café might close.

That is until the owner’s daughter decided to turn to the community for help.

To a large extent Kate Foley grew up in the café her father co-owned, waiting tables and becoming friends with hundreds of customers.

But when she decided she wanted to buy the half of the business owned by her father’s partner she ran into a big challenge.

Money.

A New Normal?: N.H.'s Post-Recession Economy

Jan 14, 2015
Philip Long / Flickr/CC

Although the state has regained all the jobs it lost in the Great Recession, many are said to be part-time or lower paying.   Still, the U.S. economy seems to be on a roll, and optimism appears to be taking hold. We’re looking at who’s faring well and why in the Granite State, and who’s been left behind.

GUESTS:

The Bad Impressions Show

Dec 31, 2014

We’ve all fumbled a first impression at some point or another. Look no further than Mr. Darcy from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Before it was published in 1814, its working title was First Impressions which probably referred to protagonist Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy’s very first encounter – which as initial impressions go, was pretty abysmal.

But who knew getting off on the wrong foot was so easy?

This show is all about bad impressions. From bungling a business meeting, to what not to wear on a first date.

Plus, a comic tells us what happens when his go-to impression loses its appeal.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.

Six more New Hampshire companies have been awarded grants to train workers in new skills.

Gov. Maggie Hassan on Monday announced that the $66,460 grant, plus matching funds from the companies, will be used to train 327 workers. The Job Training Fund has awarded more than $7 million since 2007.

The latest recipients are Felton Inc. of Londonderry, Amherst Label of Milford, EnviroVantage of Epping, Foss Manufacturing of Hampton, Fujifilm Dimatix of Lebanon and Littleton Coin Company.

thronx via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/CltVB

The New Hampshire-based company GT Advanced Technologies is heading for chapter 11 bankruptcy.

In announcing the filing today, officials said that GT is not planning to go out of business, but instead try to develop a plan to reorganize.

Bob Sanders with the New Hampshire Business Review joined All Things Considered to discuss this development.

Cascadian Farm via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/APWQE

Yes, the Market Basket dispute is over, but not all is rosy in the New Hampshire food world. Take for example, the legal challenge in Walpole between two ice cream shops.

Ella Nilsen / NHPR

The long-running dispute in the Market Basket supermarket chain appears to be growing.

Recently the company ousted CEO Arthur T. Demoulas, who had vocal support from Market Basket employees but had long been at odds with a faction on the board led by his cousin.

Brian Smestad, courtesy of Blue Tree LLC

A Mexican lime shortage had some NH bar owners worried. 

Margaritas, mojitos, gin and tonics... when you think of summer drinks, there's probably a lime in the picture. But up until a few weeks ago, this summer looked pretty grim – at least lime-wise.

“We were paying $50 a case to begin with,” says Jim Derosiers, “and then they jumped up to $150 a case and $175 a case.”

Desrosiers is the bar manager at Poco's Bow Street Cantina in Portsmouth. Every week, Poco's goes through about 15 cases of 250 limes each.

Sheryl Rich-Kern for NHPR

What’s a classic profile of an entrepreneur? Smart, prone to risk and under the age of thirty. 

Steve Young of StreetWize Technologies personifies some of those qualities, except he’s a 56-year old starting a new business aimed at older motorcycle riders.

Young takes his fiery orange Harley Davidson touring bike out for a spin near his shop in Nashua. Soon he’ll install a product in the bike that you can’t see: a hidden third wheel. 

Hola
Angel Raul Revelo Rodriguez / Flickr Creative Commons

The Currency is our ongoing look at economic and business news in New Hampshire. 

Fireworks Industry Thrives In N.H. Amid Loose Regulations

Backyard pyrotechnics are a favorite—and legal—way for Granite Staters to celebrate the Fourth of July.  And the fireworks lobby has been fighting to not only keep them legal, but to deregulate them. 

Amanda Loder / NHPR

The Currency is our ongoing look at economic and business news in New Hampshire. 

Market Basket CEO Ouster Brings Protest

Jun 24, 2014

Market Basket employees from New Hampshire are among those heading to a Massachusetts rally protesting the removal of longtime Market Basket president Arthur T. Demoulas.

Cody White works at a Market Basket in Concord.

White: We probably have like, ten employees going down to the rally right now to go show our support for Artie T., who is the leader of Market Basket. The board members are trying to get him fired, essentially—so we have a lot of support, and there’s even more from all the other stores.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and a group of New Hampshire business representatives are on a trade mission in Turkey.  Jeffrey Rose, commissioner of the state Department of Resources and Economic Development, says Hassan's presence will help open doors to businesses seeking to connect with Turkish businesses. He says Turkey has emerged as an important market and is New Hampshire's 12th largest trading partner. New Hampshire sent $79 million in goods and services to Turkey last year.  The group is in Turkey until Friday.

Rustic Crust Pushes To Restart Production In April

Mar 17, 2014
American Flatbread Pizza
Kelly Garbato / Flickr Creative Commons

  Construction crews are working two shifts a day to open a temporary facility for the Rustic Crust company in Pittsfield.  Earlier this month a fire burned down its production facility.

LendingMemo / Flickr Creative Commons

Just many places across the country, the New Hampshire’s recover from the recession has been slow. Recently, though, many are pointing to signs of an upswing. Housing prices are going up, while foreclosures are going down.  Consumer confidence is better than it has been in a while, and unemployment is now at 5.1% - 11th best in the country. But all is not perfect:  many in the Granite State worry about high energy costs, the Affordable Care Act’s effect on business, and uneven progress in different regions of the state.

BIA Announces Bills Targeted For Opposition

Jan 29, 2014

The Business and Industry Association has come out in opposition to seven bills before the legislature this session.  

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2013/12/04/5-facts-about-the-minimum-wage/ / Pew Research Center

As more states increase their minimum wages beyond the federal level, New Hampshire’s has remained at the same at seven dollars and twenty-five cents an hour. Now, some state lawmakers want to raise it, saying it will help lift workers out of poverty and boost the economy. Opponents though, warn of unintended consequences, including layoffs and slower job growth.

GUESTS:

The Man Who Owns The Moon...Maybe

Jan 6, 2014
Photo by Steve Jurvetson, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Dennis M. Hope claims to own the moon.  He's been taking advantage of an obscure international treaty loophole since 1980, selling off lunar property, and declaring himself owner of the Lunar Embassy, and President of the Galactic Government.  Sound like a joke?  It's not. It's just business.

Nine New Hampshire companies will share more than $100,000 in state Job Training Fund grants awarded this month.  

Via Business NH Magazine

This week, we’re talking about work…what we do…and how our attitudes and expectations concerning work have fared under the long shadow of the 2008 financial crisis. Today, we’re taking advantage of some good timing. New Hampshire-based tech company Dyn is holding its third annual 'Culture-Con' tomorrow in its Manchester headquarters.

We talked with two participants in the gathering to talk how companies create workplace cultures that attract and engage and retain workers in meaningful and lasting ways, Dyn's COO, Gray Chynoweth, and Amanda Osmer of Grappone Automotive Group.

Note of disclosure: Grappone is an NHPR underwriter, and Gray Chynoweth serves on NHPR's Community Advisory Board.

BIA Releases Strategic Economic Plan For N.H.

Nov 18, 2013

  The Business and Industry Association of New Hampshire has released its first economic plan for the state

The plan includes more than 100 policy recommendations covering nine areas believed to be essential to the state’s economy.  The recommendations include some classic BIA issues, like streamlining access to the Research and Development tax credit and increasing STEM education.  But there’s also a recommendation to emphasize arts, culture and history in schools. 

catchesthelight via Flickr Creative Commons

Three years after it was put up for sale, an 11-generation family farm in New Hampshire has been sold. 

Members of the Tuttle family owned the 135-acre farm in Dover since 1632, one of America's oldest continuously operated family farms.  They put the fruit-and-vegetable farm up for sale in the summer of 2010 as they dealt with competition from supermarkets, pick-it-yourself farms and debt. 

The original price was $3.35 million. Foster's Daily Democrat reports it sold last month for a little over $1 million to Matt Kozazcki, who owns a farm in Newbury, Massachusetts.  

New Hampshire's tax receipts are $25 million ahead of estimates so far this fiscal year despite a weak showing in October.

Administrative Services Commissioner Linda Hodgdon said receipts were $2 million below estimates, but October is a relatively small tax month. The state collected $105 million and had forecast receiving $107 million. Hodgdon said business taxes were down over $4 million, but such a small tax collection month makes it difficult to know if that signals a trend.

Since July 1, the state has collected $541 million.

via Knack.it

There’s been a lot of fuss made in recent years over the increasing “gamification” of everyday life – that is, the use of game mechanics in unusual settings like personal fitness, or in schools – where the incentive to get points or awards might have more motivational power than getting good grades, or dropping a dress size. In the workplace, companies like Cold Stone Creamery and the Miller Brewing have starting using video games to train fresh hires – and a recent study by the University of Colorado found that employees trained using video games did their jobs better, and retained information longer than those who were instructed by more conventional methods. One company thinks video games can play a role in businesses even earlier – before an employee has even been hired.

B.C. Angell via Flickr Creative Commons

Leather shoes and accessories manufacturer Cole Haan is moving its headquarters from Maine to New Hampshire.

Officials said on Friday that the headquarters will relocate from Scarborough, Maine to Greenland, N.H., where its customer service and distribution center is located.

Karen Martin, executive director of the Scarborough Economic Development Corp., tells the Portland Press Herald that about 110 people work at headquarters.

The company didn't disclose when it plans to relocate or how many employees would be affected.

Concord Hospital Names New CEO

Oct 2, 2013

Concord Hospital is getting a new CEO.

The hospital Board of Trustees has selected Robert Steigmeyer. He is expected to start the first week of January 2014.

Steigmeyer has been the chief executive officer at Geisinger Community Medical Center in Scranton, Pa., since 2012 and a leader of a community medical center that eventually joined it.

She Shimmers via Flickr Creative Commons

Fall in New Hampshire means fairs, foliage – and getting out to one of the state's 300-odd apple orchards to pick your own. Elaine Starkey is out at Butternut Farm in Farmington, with her sons and grandkids, to do just that.

"They usually have donuts, but we got here a little late."

'Pick Your Own Apples' now means not just picking the fruit, but also hay rides, corn mazes, petting animals, And enjoying other seasonal products, like cider, pies, and yes, donuts. 

Nick McPhee via flickr Creative Commons

The Department of Labor reports that last year’s national wage rate crept up only 2%, confirming what many US workers can already tell you: wages have stagnated. Not so for one high-demand job: babysitters. Over the past 30 years, teenage babysitting rates have risen nine times faster than the rate of inflation – commanding an average of $10 per hour. Depending on location and a sitter’s skill set, parents can shell out as much as $17 an hour for a night out. Megan Woolhouse covers the economy for the Boston Globe’s business section. Her article on babysitters making bank alerted us to this one sector of high wage growth.

Bryan Costin via flickr Creative Commons

How much tip do you typically leave for your server when you dine out? Maybe 20% if the service is good? 18% if you can do the math? The New York Post reported last year that many diners in that city leave a 25% to even 30% gratuity to their bill. Tipping is meant to incentivize and reward exceptional service, but a new movement proposes that the quest for the mighty tip is at the root of some problems in the restaurant industry. Bruce McAdams is a seasoned restauranteur and professor leading the Sustainable Restaurant Project at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada…he gave a Ted-X talk last year on the problems with restaurant tipping.

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