cancer treatment

Cancer in the Granite State, Part II: New Treatments

Jul 13, 2016

The second in our two-part series on Cancer in the Granite State.  President Obama announced "a cancer moonshot" in his State of the Union address earlier this year, with increased funding for research and treatment in the hopes of accelerating the search for a cure. We look at advances in cancer treatment recently, including promising methods such as immunotherapy.  We also examine the latest research and developments in the search for a cure.  Plus, we delve into the financial and emotional stresses of dealing with the disease. 


Meet Declan Alexander Rourke, an AT/RT cancer survivor.

Soon he’s visiting Disneyland, and is super pumped about a Star Wars attraction, where he will get to fight Darth Maul.

“I am not sure if Maul is going to have a single bladed light-saber, or a double, because in the Clone Wars, he has a single… Episode One… double,” he effuses, slapping his hand on the table for emphasis.

via wikimedia commons

In 1959 scientists caught their first glimpse of a genetic mutation, ‘the Philadelphia chromosome’ and began unraveling the mysterious role it plays in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and led to the development of Gleevec, a groundbreaking drug that made this once-fatal cancer treatable with a single daily pill. Jessica Wapner is a freelance science writer, and her new book chronicling the back story behind the breakthrough, “The Philadelphia Chromosome: A Mutant Gene and the Quest to Cure Cancer at the Genetic Level” was released this month.

When Lisa Galloway was trying to decide what kind of radiation treatment to undergo after surgery for early breast cancer, she jumped at the chance to get a newer, quicker approach.

Instead of dragging on for weeks, the newer form of radiation, called brachytherapy, only takes five days.

"Five days compared to 33 days, I was like, 'Yay!' " says Galloway, 53, of Silver Spring, Md. "So I wanted it so badly. I got it — I got my wish."