Carol Shea-Porter

U.S. Reps. Annie Kuster and Carol Shea-Porter of New Hampshire have signed a petition that would force a vote to end the federal government shutdown.

The two Democrats agree that it's time for a vote to reopen the government nearly two weeks into what Kuster called a damaging shutdown that is hurting Granite State families and businesses.

The discharge petition is a special congressional procedure that would allow a majority of voters to force a vote on a bill to reopen the government.

Roger Wood

New Hampshire First District Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter says she sympathizes with federal government employees who face furloughs.

Chris Jenson

New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte is the only member of the state’s Congressional delegation who has not pledged support for an assault weapons ban this week.

Michael Brindley, NHPR

While seen as a rising star in her party, Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte says she has no plans to be the nation's first female president.

Cheryl Senter, NHPR

One of New Hampshire’s new installations to the U.S. House of Representatives, Carol Shea-Porter,  has served there before. That means freshmen orientation is a little different for the returning Congresswoman.

Zach Nugent / NHPR

The tightest race in New Hampshire lived up to expectations last night. Carol Shea-Porter eked out a victory over Frank Guinta by four points, or just fewer than 14,000 votes.

While the race was close all the way through, indications that it would be a good night for Shea-Porter rolled in early. It was the wee hours of the morning when Carol Shea-Porter thanked a dwindling crowd of night-owl supporters for handing her back the seat in the US House of Representatives that she lost two-years ago.

NHPR / Sam Evans-Brown

This race is real bellwether for a number of reasons: the district itself demographically perfectly balanced between liberal and conservative voters, both candidates have held the seat before meaning they are more-or-less on equal footing in terms of name recognition, and both are party stalwarts have voted with their partys’ leadership high in 90th the percentile.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

This time around in the first congressional district the names are the same but the roles are flipped; Republican Frank Guinta, once the challenger, is now the incumbent. But that’s not the only way this year’s race is like a mirror image of last election.

When Congressman Frank Guinta goes out knocking on the doors of independents in Manchester – his political backyard – most everybody knows who he is.

Guinta: Good Morning!

Cheryl Senter, NHPR

This week we’re talking about jobs and the economy with the candidates in New Hampshire’s 1st congressional district. Today All Things Considered host Brady Carlson talks with Carol Shea-Porter, who served two terms in Congress and is once again the Democratic nominee in the district.

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

The Guinta campaign has taken issue with another television ad in the race for the first congressional district. This is just the latest salvo of the tit-for-tat that has characterized the contest.

Guinta’s campaign is upset about an ad from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, because it makes the following claim…

Ad: Frank Guinta voted to make you pay over $1,000 dollars a year more in taxes.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

The campaigns of Carol Shea-Porter and Frank Guinta are trading sharp words over a Shea-Porter ad claiming Guinta voted to cut money for veterans’ programs. The ad that Shea-Porter’s campaign released last week stuck to the aggressive tone that the former congresswoman has adopted this election cycle.

Abby Goldstein / NHPR

New Hampshire’s first district candidates for Congress battled Monday in a debate moderated by NHPR’s Laura Knoy. The topics for discussion stayed within the realm of economic policy and job creation and energy policy was among the stickier points.

Much of the debate between Congressman Frank Guinta and former Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter was an argument of who should and should not receive federal tax dollars. This was highlighted when the candidates were asked how they would address the rising cost of energy.

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