Catholic Medical Center

Jack Rodolico

Catholic Medical Center in Manchester is your typical general hospital: they deliver babies, set broken bones, perform heart surgery. And it might be as good a place as any to witness how the opioid epidemic is transforming healthcare in New Hampshire.

Catholic Medical Center in Manchester is partnering with Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, a move designed to increase access to specialized services for residents of southern New Hampshire.

The hospitals announced the clinical affiliation Wednesday.

Officials with CMC say the move means its patients will have greater access to services for substance abuse, cardiac care, neuroscience, and stroke care.   

www.mas-concorp.com

 

A small hospital in Wolfeboro is exploring an affiliation with a much larger medical center in Manchester.

The governing boards at Huggins Hospital and Catholic Medical Center have approved a non-binding letter of intent to pursue an affiliation. Huggins Hospital has 25 beds and 400 employees, while CMC has 330 beds with 2,500 employees.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon

Three New Hampshire hospitals will be penalized next year for potentially avoidable mistakes, such as patient infections and injuries.

The federal government claims Dartmouth-Hitchcock in Lebanon and Eliot Hospital and Catholic Medical Center in Manchester should have done more to protect people from a list of "hospital-acquired conditions" in 2013. Those conditions include falls, bed sores, and infections from catheters.

As a result, in the fiscal year starting next October, the feds will penalize those three hospitals one percent of their Medicare payments.