Charitable Giving

NH Teen Institute

Jul 14, 2012

The New Hampshire Teen Institute is a non-profit organization that offers leadership and risk prevention training to teens, helping them understand and grow into their own strengths and potential. Susanna Keilig participated and volunteered in the Teen Institute’s “Leaders in Prevention” program and in the week-long summer program.

Stacy Carey’s daughters were able to attend the Southern District YMCA’s Camp Lincoln on scholarship. As a result, Stacy was able to return to the workforce.

The Second Wind Foundation’s Upper Valley Turning Point Recovery Center supports people in recovery from addiction and addictive behavior.  The center hosts AA meetings and helps match people with sponsors, provides care plans and helps with job searches.  Its Willow Grove facility provides transitional housing.  The organization helped Terry Gianelli get her life back on track.

The Rochester Opera House is a historic theater located in the Rochester city hall. It has been a center of community and community entertainment for more than a century. Now it is leased and operated as a non-profit, bringing a variety of shows and performance opportunities to the community. Shay Willard started acting there as a sixth grader; he is now a graduate student in film production and is directing a play at the opera house.

The Mount Kearsarge Indian Museum is dedicated to sharing Native American history and culture, past and present, with all who come through its doors. In addition to displaying its collection and maintaining a lending library, the museum holds Powwows and runs educational and special programs. Peter Newell is chief of the New Hampshire Intertribal Native American Council.

Robin, the cat.

The Humane Society for Greater Nashua cares for more than 2,500 animals each year. And it provides some often overlooked services to people who need help caring for their pets. Pam Gustafson has adopted cats from the shelter, and volunteers there.

Seacoast Family Promise organizes a network of religious congregations to help homeless families. These congregations open their facilities on a rotating basis to provide overnight shelter and meals; at the organizations’s day center, staff help families with the support they need to get back on their feet. Karen and her son came to Seacoast Family Promise for help in 2009.

Pages