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Residents in the town of Troy are trying to figure out what to do with an unexpected windfall.

When former resident Betty Giorgianni died at the age of 90 earlier in April, she left the town a gift of $821,500.

For a large city, that might be a drop in the bucket, but for this community of about 2,000 people in the southwest corner of New Hampshire, it’s a big deal.

The gift amounts to roughly half of the town’s overall annual budget.

Tom Matson is chairman of the Troy Board of Selectmen. He joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the gift.


The New Hampshire attorney general's office is reminding consumers that nonprofit charitable groups have to register with the state, after getting complaints about a group selling raffle tickets.

The Charitable Trust Unit says people bought tickets from a nonprofit called Smile God Loves U Foundation, which said it was helping people get treatment for heroin addiction. It wasn't registered.

It sold tickets to benefit a substance abuse treatment center. A $50 ticket offered a chance to win two snowmobiles with a trailer or $12,500.

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In the holiday season, many Granite Staters think about donations to the charities and nonprofits in New Hampshire and elsewhere that work on a wide array of causes. Deciding where to give can be difficult, though -- with questions about which groups use the money most effectively, and how to judge their performance.

This program was originally broadcast on 12/14/15.


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Last month China ended its controversial one-child policy – but is the change as radical as it’s been made out to be by officials and news outlets? Today, a reporter on China's new "two-child policy"... and why the country really needs to focus on sex-ed. Plus, Millennials are sometimes derided as a generation slacktivists, and don't have the spending power of their elders – but non-profits are betting on them for the future. From socially conscious spending, to gimmicky donation challenges, we explore how Millennials are changing the face of charitable giving.

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When it comes to stump speeches, presidential contenders want their words to resonate with as many voters as possible – which may explain why Donald Trump speaks to the public at a 4th grade reading level. Today, the strategy of simplicity. Then, they say charity begins at home - but can altruism go too far? We take a look at the complicated motivations behind the actions of extreme "do-gooders", and the strangely hostile reactions they sometimes face from the world around them.


They say charity begins at home - but can altruism go too far? Today on Word of Mouth, a look at the complicated motivations behind the actions of extreme "do-gooders", and the strangely hostile reactions they sometimes face from the world around them. Plus, a historical look at presidential debates: Brady Carlson talks about how and when they became influential parts of the process, and remembers some noteworthy zingers and gaffes from decades past. 

Listen to the full show

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Lots of organizations use 5ks and "fun runs" to raise money for charity – few involve sitting on a couch for hours at a time.  Today, how a super-fast, bizarre style of video-game playing has become a fundraising cash cow. Plus, we’ll celebrate the 30th anniversary of the video game industry’s most lucrative character of all time: Mario! Then, as the Daily Show’s “Senior Muslim or Foreign Looking Correspondent,” Aasif Mandvi helped Americans laugh at their own prejudice. We’ll hear why he almost refused the job. 

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Once relegated to fanzines and the occasional bookstore, “fan fiction” is quickly becoming more accessible, more mainstream, and in some cases, more of a headache for authors who inspired the fans in the first place. On today’s show, why some authors are bucking against the trend.

Then, the days of the charity 5k may be over. Despite an improving economy, many of the biggest charity races are reporting drops in participation and funds raised. We’ll find out why adventure races like Tough Mudder may be to blame.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments. 

Evaluating Charities: What Donors Need To Know

Dec 23, 2014
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We’re taking a look at charitable giving in New Hampshire – from what factors donors should consider, to why Granite Staters give so little.


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Nearly a week has passed since Typhoon Haiyan ripped through the Philippines.  Aid organizations are reporting more than 10,000 dead, though Filipino President Aquino says that number is far overblown. Whatever the number, many more will likely succumb to disease or dehydration as relief slowly pours in to the hardest hit areas. Security is a major concern among officials in areas now teetering towards anarchy. Yesterday, Reuters reported that nearly 30,000 bags of rice were stolen from a government warehouse and rampant looting has turned deadly.   

Americans spring into action after such disasters, emptying their cupboards of old canned goods, medicines and clothing. Jessica Alexander urges you not to. She’s the  author of Chasing Chaos: My Decade In And Out Of Humanitarian Aid. We read her article “Please Don’t Send Your Old Shoes To The Philippines” on and reached her this morning at the UN.

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In the four weeks since the Boston Marathon bombings, the One Fund set up to collect donations for victims has raised more than twenty-eight million dollars. The decision on how that money gets distributed goes to Kenneth Feinberg, the so-called “great decider”. 

At public hearings held last week at the Boston Public Library, Feinberg stated that there is not enough money in the One Fund to satisfy everyone. Here to discuss how dollars get assigned to tragedies is Juliette Kayyem, national security and foreign policy columnist for the Boston Globe. She’s former assistant secretary for intergovernmental affairs at the department of homeland security.

Jonathan Lynch / NHPR

Former Massachusetts senator Scott Brown spoke at a charity event in Nashua.

Brown appeared as the keynote speaker at a gala held by the Child Advocacy Center of Hillsborough County.

The organization provides support for sexually abused children in New Hampshire.

Kristie Palestino is the Executive Director of the Granite State Children's Alliance and says the ball is a critical source of income for the group:

Rick Ganley

In Essex, Vermont there’s a scale replica of a famous baseball park. In fact, there are two. In 2000, Pat O’ Connor had the crazy idea to build a version of Boston’s famed Fenway Park in his backyard. The following year he began to hold Wiffle ball tournaments to raise money for various charities. Later, he built another field next door- Little Wrigley.  Fast forward to 2013, and those two fields host dozens of charity tournaments each year, and have helped to raise more than 2 million dollars.  And there’s talk of yet another field.

The 65th annual fall foliage festival took place in Warner, New Hampshire this weekend. Attendees could purchase crafts by local artisans, go on rides, or share a country breakfast the United Church of Warner.

Photo Credit Vissago, Via Flickr Creative Commons

On Sunday, the Grammy award winning Muir String Quartet will perform at a benefit for Classical Music by the Sea in North Hampton. Proceeds will benefit The Classics for Kids Foundation, which helps to provide school music programs throughout the United States with quality stringed instruments. The benefit begins with an afternoon reception followed by the concert at 6.